Choose a Topic ....
Photograph Galleries
ABCDEFGHIKLMNOPQRSTUWY
Lincoln Buildings
 
Lincoln, Arboretum, Bandstand
Lincoln, Arboretum, Bandstand
Lincoln, Arboretum, Bandstand

The nationally celebrated designer Edward Milner was employed at Lincoln to create the Arboretum on Monks Road in 1872.

The bandstand was soon a popular and well used feature of the public park.

It was restored in the 1990s as part of a £2m project undertaken by the City Council.

May 2013

Buildings, Lincoln arboretum, bandstand, Edward Milner
Lincoln, Arboretum, Fountain
Lincoln, Arboretum, Fountain
Lincoln, Arboretum, Fountain

The fountain is center image and jets of water should be rising from top of the structure - unfortunately not working.

Local signage states :-

"The Lake is a key feature of The Arboretum.

The designer Edward Milner intended it to be both an ornamental and practical feature as it was designed to collect water from the many springs on the site.

The Fountain was erected in 1911, 39 years after ,the opening of The Arboretum, to celebrate the inauguration of Lincoln's new water supply from Elksley Water Works.

The introduction of the new water supply was greeted with great celebration and the fountain is composed of cores taken from the bore hole at Elksley" 

DB 1 August 2019

Lincoln, Arboretum, Fountain
Lincoln, Arboretum, Statue of Lion
Lincoln, Arboretum, Statue of Lion
Lincoln, Arboretum, Statue of Lion

"Statue of lion. 1872. By Austin & Seeley. Presented by FJ Clarke"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1388691

Francis Jonathan Clarke (1841-1888) was a successful Lincoln High Street chemist, and Mayor of Lincoln 3 times, 1878-9, 1883-4, 1884-5.

Famous for Clarke's Blood Mixture.

http://www.itsaboutlincoln.co.uk/the-arboretum.html

All Saints Church, Monks Road just visible in the background, in the gap between the trees.

DB 1 August 2019

Lincoln, Arboretum, Statue of Lion, Francis Jonathan Clarke
Lincoln, Bishop's Palace
Lincoln, Bishop's Palace
Lincoln, Bishop's Palace

This ruined building has elements from the thirteenth and fifteenth centuries; it was begun by St Hugh.

The building is owned by English Heritage.

Peter Grey Archive, 1969

Buildings, Bishops' Palace
Lincoln, Blyton Cottage
Lincoln, Blyton Cottage
Lincoln, Blyton Cottage

This small cottage in lower High Street was demolished and replaced by a new public house, Golden Cross Inn, in 1958.

Buildings, Blyton Cottage, Golden Cross Inn
Lincoln, Boultham Hall Lodge, Hall Drive
Lincoln, Boultham Hall Lodge, Hall Drive
Lincoln, Boultham Hall Lodge, Hall Drive

Boultham Hall, owned by Colonel Richard Ellison, was rebuilt and enlarged during 1874 and the lodge is presumably contemporary with that rebuilding.

Boultham Hall itself was demolished in 1959.

http://www.boulthampark.co.uk/history/ 

DB 31 July 2019

Lincoln, Boultham Hall Lodge, Hall Drive
Lincoln, Boultham Park, Bandstand
Lincoln, Boultham Park, Bandstand
Lincoln, Boultham Park, Bandstand

"Sunday 25th March 2018 was an emotional day for many in the community as the park’s bandstand was played in for the first time since its extensive restoration"

http://www.boulthampark.co.uk/the-1920s-come-roaring-into-the-park/ 

"The new roof will be made of durable zinc and the concrete surround will be resurfaced along with brickwork base improvements"

http://www.boulthampark.co.uk/bandstand-80th-year-refresh/ 

DB 23 April 2018 

Lincoln, Boultham Park, Bandstand
Lincoln, Boultham Park, Bandstand
Lincoln, Boultham Park, Bandstand
Lincoln, Boultham Park, Bandstand

Original plate recording opening of the bandstand on 22nd August 1936.

Opened by the Mayor Councillor J.J. Leamey.

DB 23 April 2018 

Lincoln, Boultham Park, Bandstand, Mayor, J.J. Leamey
Lincoln, Boultham Park, Joseph Ruston Gates (Off Boultham Park Road)
Lincoln, Boultham Park, Joseph Ruston Gates (Off Boultham Park Road)
Lincoln, Boultham Park, Joseph Ruston Gates (Off Boultham Park Road)

An accompanying plaque states :-

"The Joseph Ruston Gates

These gates were originally made for Joseph Ruston's Monks Manor estate, around 2.5 miles northeast of here, to the east of Lincoln Cathedral. 

Joseph Ruston (1835 - 1897) was a mechanical engineer and, amongst many achievements, head of Ruston, Proctor & Company, a major agricultural engineering company which was situated near here.

He was a great benefactor to Lincoln and at different times held the positions of Mayor of Lincoln, High Sheriff of Lincolnshire and MP for Lincoln. 

The Monks Manor estate was demolished in 1932, and soon after the gates were installed here at the main entrance to Boultham Park, which had become a public park in 1929. 

The piers were designed by William Watkins in 1872, when he was remodelling and enlarging Boultham Hall for Colonel Richard Ellison. 

The gates were restored in 2018 as part of the Boultham Park Restoration Project"

DB 31 July 2019

Lincoln, Boultham Park, Joseph Ruston Gates
Lincoln, Bracebridge Hall, Newark Road
Lincoln, Bracebridge Hall, Newark Road
Lincoln, Bracebridge Hall, Newark Road

"Country house, now an old people's home. 1883. By Albert Vicars for F Clarke, manufacturer of patent medicines"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1388710 

The once spacious grounds and parkland have been reduced to almost nothing.

Now known as Grosvenor Hall private nursing home.

DB 19 February 2019 

Bracebridge Hall, Grosvenor Hall, Francis Clarke
Lincoln, Burghersh Chantry
Lincoln, Burghersh Chantry
Lincoln, Burghersh Chantry

This photograph was taken in 1965, shortly after a disastrous fire.

The chantry was founded in 1345 for five priests; the building shown here in mostly mid-eighteenth century.

Buildings, Burghersh Chantry
Lincoln, Castle
Lincoln, Castle
Lincoln, Castle

The Norman Castle at Lincoln was built by William the Conqueror in the late-eleventh century on the site of a Roman structure.

It is owned by Lincolnshire County Council and is used for outdoor concerts and the annual Christmas Market.

Undated postcard

Lincoln Castle, Norman, William the Conqueror,
Lincoln, Castle
Lincoln, Castle
Lincoln, Castle

Lincoln Castle viewed from the west front of the Cathedral.

"The castle was the focus of attention during the First Battle of Lincoln on 2 February 1141, during the struggle between King Stephen and Empress Matilda over who should be monarch in England. It was held but damaged, and a new tower, called the Lucy Tower, was built.

Lincoln Castle was again besieged before the Second Battle of Lincoln, on 20 May 1217, during the reign of Henry III of England during the course of the First Barons' War. This was the period of political struggle that followed the sealing of Magna Carta on 15 June 1215"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Castle 

DB 13 May 2019

Lincoln Castle
Lincoln, Castle, Assize Courts
Lincoln, Castle, Assize Courts
Lincoln, Castle, Assize Courts

"Assize courts. 1823. By Sir Robert Smirke. South entrance porch early C20"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1388488 

Still used today as Lincoln's Crown Courts. 

DB 29 July 2019

Lincoln Castle, Assize court
Lincoln, Castle, East Gate
Lincoln, Castle, East Gate
Lincoln, Castle, East Gate

This view looks east from within the castle grounds towards the East Gate.

1930s photograph

Buildings, Lincoln Castle, East Gate
Lincoln, Castle, East Gate
Lincoln, Castle, East Gate
Lincoln, Castle, East Gate

An almost identical view of the East Gate of the Castle, also dating from the 1930s.

Francis Frith postcard, 1939

Buildings, Lincoln Castle
Lincoln, Castle, East Gate, Oriel Window
Lincoln, Castle, East Gate, Oriel Window
Lincoln, Castle, East Gate, Oriel Window

"On the north wall inside the gateway, a reset canted C15 oriel window with three ogee headed lancets and crocketed pinnacles, from a house in the High Street opposite St Mary's Guildhall"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1388491 

"Oriel window in gatehouse, moved from John of Gaunt’s Palace, Lincoln, in 1849"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Castle 

DB 29 July 2019

Lincoln, Castle, Gatehouse, Oriel Window
Lincoln, Central Mosque & Cultural Centre
Lincoln, Central Mosque & Cultural Centre
Lincoln, Central Mosque & Cultural Centre

Lincoln's first purpose built mosque opened on 13 April 2018.

Situated off Boultham Park Road.

http://www.lincolncentralmosque.org.uk/  

DB 4 February 2019

Lincoln Central Mosque & Cultural Centre
Lincoln, Central Mosque & Cultural Centre
Lincoln, Central Mosque & Cultural Centre
Lincoln, Central Mosque & Cultural Centre

A second view of the mosque which cost around £2 million to build.

http://www.lincolncentralmosque.org.uk/ 

Built on site of the former Boultham Dairy.

DB 4 February 2019

Lincoln, Central Mosque & Cultural Centre
Lincoln, Chancery, Minster Yard
Lincoln, Chancery, Minster Yard
Lincoln, Chancery, Minster Yard

"Chancery, and adjoining outbuildings, now a house. C13, C14, late C15, C16, late C17.

Altered early C18 and late C19.

Rear range has substantial remains of buildings erected in the time of Chancellor Antony Bek, 1321-1329.

Street range and parlour wing probably built by Chancellor Geoffrey Simeon, 1485-1506, incorporating the arms of Bishop John Russell, 1480-94"

"This building is important as a surviving example of early C14 and late C15 domestic building, and because of its early use of a brick front.

In addition to being the official residence of high ranking clergy, it was leased c1381-1397 by Katharine Swinford"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1380559 

Currently being used as the Deanery. 

DB 27 September 2018

Lincoln, Chancery, Minster Yard, Katharine Swinford
Lincoln, Cottesford Place
Lincoln, Cottesford Place
Lincoln, Cottesford Place

The stable and coach house at Cottesford Place on East Bight were repaired and adapted as a house in 1960.

The original house, owned by the Dean and Chapter and occupied by a canon of the cathedral, was destroyed by Royalist troops in 1648.

The later eighteenth century house was demolished in c.1957.

Buildings, Cottesford Place, East Bight, Royalist Troops
Lincoln, Exchequergate
Lincoln, Exchequergate
Lincoln, Exchequergate

Exchequergate Arch gives access from Castle Square into the Cathedral Close.  This view is from high up on the west front of the Cathedral.

February 2012

Buildings, Exchequeragte Arch
Lincoln, Exchequergate
Lincoln, Exchequergate
Lincoln, Exchequergate

The oldest of the gates which were built along with walls to fortify the Cathedral precincts, Exchequer Gate dates from the fourteenth century.

Inside the arches there is vaulting with diagonal and ridge-ribs.

SLHA occupied the northern section of this building, (as an office) for a period of time during the 1980s.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, Exchequergate, Cathedral,
Lincoln, Exchequergate
Lincoln, Exchequergate
Lincoln, Exchequergate
Peter Grey Archive, 1965
Buildings, Exchequergate Arch
Lincoln, Hartsholme Hall
Lincoln, Hartsholme Hall
Lincoln, Hartsholme Hall

This fine house was designed by F H Goddard in 1862.

undated postcard

Buildings, Hartsholme Hall, F H Goddard
Lincoln, Hartsholme Hall
Lincoln, Hartsholme Hall
Lincoln, Hartsholme Hall

Francis Henry Goddard built Hartsholme Hall on the south-western edge of Lincoln for Joseph Shuttleworth, the industrialist, in 1862.

Lord Liverpool bought the house, estate and additional land in 1908 before moving to nearby, smaller Canwick Hall in 1939.

In 1951 Lincoln City Council bought the property and demolished the house.

Buildings, Hartsholme Hall, Joseph Shuttleworth, Lord Liverpool
Lincoln, HM Prison, Greetwell Road
Lincoln, HM Prison, Greetwell Road
Lincoln, HM Prison, Greetwell Road

"Lincoln opened as a local prison in 1872 to hold remand and convicted prisoners and replacing the prison at Lincoln Castle.

The original 1869–72 structures designed by Frederick Peck are now listed buildings and are notable examples of High Victorian gothic design.

The prison accommodation has been altered and extended at various times in the 20th century"

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HM_Prison_Lincoln

DB 26 February 2019

Lincoln, Prison, Greetwell Road, HMP, Frederick Peck
Lincoln, HM Prison, Greetwell Road
Lincoln, HM Prison, Greetwell Road
Lincoln, HM Prison, Greetwell Road

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states :-

"His Majesty's Prison, on the Greetwell road, three quarters of a mile from the Cathedral, is a building of red brick, faced with Ancaster stone, and was opened in June, 1872, at a cost of about £39,000; the principal entrance is by a gateway flanked by embattled towers; on either side of the entrance are the governor's and chief warder's houses, and there is also a chapel, with a good organ; the building will now hold about 400 prisoners.

Female prisoners are now sent to Nottingham.

The total staff of officers is 26"

DB 26 February 2019

Lincoln, Prison, Greetwell Road, HMP
Lincoln, Jew's House
Lincoln, Jew's House
Lincoln, Jew's House

The Jew's House at the foot of Steep Hill is a two-storeyed stone house of the twelfth century.

It is one of the oldest domestic buildings in the country and is generally considered to have been the rabbi's house.

The hall was on the upper floor with an ornate entrance from the street.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, Jew's House, Steep Hill,
Lincoln, Jew's House
Lincoln, Jew's House
Lincoln, Jew's House

The Jew's House at the foot of Steep Hill is a two-storeyed stone house of the twelfth century.

It is one of the oldest domestic buildings in the country and is generally considered to have been the rabbi's house.

The hall was on the upper floor with an ornate entrance from the street.

Undated postcard, probably c1930

Lincoln, Jew's House, rabbi,
Lincoln, Jews' Court
Lincoln, Jews' Court
Lincoln, Jews' Court

Jews' Court, home of SLHA, was rescued from proposed demolition by the City Council in the 1930s.

Much of its construction is medieval and it is possibly the site of an earlier synagogue.

Buildings, Lincoln, Jews' Court
Lincoln, Jews' Court and Jew's House
Lincoln, Jews' Court and Jew's House
Lincoln, Jews' Court and Jew's House

Jews' Court (on the right), home of SLHA, is immediately adjacent to the Jew's House.

Much of its construction is medieval and it is possibly the site of an earlier synagogue.

Lincoln, Jews' Court, Jew's House,
Lincoln, Lincolnshire County Offices
Lincoln, Lincolnshire County Offices
Lincoln, Lincolnshire County Offices

The County Offices on Newland, built in 1932, incorporate an earlier eighteenth century house.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Buildings, Lincolnshire County Council Officeds
Lincoln, Magistrates' Court, High Street
Lincoln, Magistrates' Court, High Street
Lincoln, Magistrates' Court, High Street

Opened by the Prince of Wales on 20th November 1990.

Superseded the magistrates courts at Lincoln Castle and the old Sessions House which latter is now part of Lincoln College.

https://www.lincolnshirelife.co.uk/posts/view/lincoln-courthouse-and-gaol 

DB 4 February 2019

Lincoln Magistrates' Court, High Street
Lincoln, Magistrates' Court, High Street
Lincoln, Magistrates' Court, High Street
Lincoln, Magistrates' Court, High Street

Royal coat of arms above the entrance.

DB 4 February 2019

Lincoln Magistrates' Court
Lincoln, Michaelgate
Lincoln, Michaelgate
Lincoln, Michaelgate

A favourite view in uphill Lincoln, looking from the upper end of Michaelgate towards Steep Hill.

The timber framed building on the right is owned by the City Council.

2014

Buildings, Lincoln, Michaelgate
Lincoln, New Theatre Royal
Lincoln, New Theatre Royal
Lincoln, New Theatre Royal

"The present theatre, initially called the New Theatre Royal, was built in 1893 to the designs of Bertie Crewe and W.G.R. Sprague.

After an explosion and fire in 1892 had destroyed the previous Theatre Royal on the site, built in 1806.

The 1806 theatre was, in turn, a rebuild of an earlier theatre of 1764 on Butchery Street, now called Clasketgate.

The structure of the building remained the same until 1907, when the present frontage, foyer, and lounge were added, spinning the orientation of the entrance to face Clasketgate.

A 2010 refurbishment of public non-auditorium space restructured and modernised the foyer and bar areas.

The building is Grade II listed"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Theatre_Royal_Lincoln 

DB 20 October 2018

Lincoln, New Theatre Royal, Bertie Crewe, W.G.R. Sprague
Lincoln, New Theatre Royal, Playbill
Lincoln, New Theatre Royal, Playbill
Lincoln, New Theatre Royal, Playbill

Playbill on display in the New Theatre Royal for a 1933 production by the Denville Players.

Dempsey Stuart as the featured actor. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Denville 

Lincoln, New Theatre Royal, Playbill, Denville Players, Dempsey Stuart, actor
Lincoln, New Theatre Royal, Wartime
Lincoln, New Theatre Royal, Wartime
Lincoln, New Theatre Royal, Wartime

Wartime theatre information displayed in the New Theatre Royal.

Programmes as advertised in the "Lincolnshire Echo" and the "Lincolnshire Chronicle".

"NEAREST AIR RAID SHELTER—ST. PETER-AT-ARCHES-140 yds."

Lincoln, New Theatre Royal, war
Lincoln, Odd Fellows Hall & Rustons Club, Unity Square
Lincoln, Odd Fellows Hall & Rustons Club, Unity Square
Lincoln, Odd Fellows Hall & Rustons Club, Unity Square

Odd Fellows Hall and Rustons Club 1878.

DB 19 May 2011

Lincoln, Odd Fellows Hall, Rustons Club, Unity Square, Lincoln
Lincoln, Old Bishop's Palace, Garden
Lincoln, Old Bishop's Palace, Garden
Lincoln, Old Bishop's Palace, Garden

This view of the Cathedral from the south is partly interrupted by a substantial surviving element of the Old Bishops' Palace: the chapel range and entrance tower, built by Bishop William Alnwick, who modernised the palace in the 1430s.

For a number of years the Walled Garden in the foreground has boasted one of the most northerly working vineyards in Europe.

Postcard, c1910

Lincoln, Old Bishop's Palace, Cathedral, garden, Bishop William Alnwick, vineyard,
Lincoln, Pottergate Arch
Lincoln, Pottergate Arch
Lincoln, Pottergate Arch

This impressive medieval archway was extensively restored in 1884.

It is the south-east gateway to the Cathedral Close, though now passed on either side by the modern road.

It is constructed of local dressed stone and ashlar with rubble core and a lead roof.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, Pottergate Arch,
Lincoln, Pottergate Arch
Lincoln, Pottergate Arch
Lincoln, Pottergate Arch

This impressive medieval archway was extensively restored in 1884.

It is the south-east gateway to the Cathedral Close, though now passed on either side by the modern road.

It is constructed of local dressed stone and ashlar with rubble core and a lead roof.

1930s photograph
Lincoln Buildings, Pottergate Arch
Lincoln, Scorer, Sam - garage
Lincoln, Scorer, Sam - garage
Lincoln, Scorer, Sam - garage

Buildings, Sam Scorer garage
Lincoln, Sibthorp House
Lincoln, Sibthorp House
Lincoln, Sibthorp House

This was the town house of the Sibthorp family (of Canwick) which stood on the east side of High Street between Portland Street and Tentercroft Street.

Much of the building dated from the sixteenth century but the High Street façade (shown here) was replaced in the early seventeenth century.

Buildings, Sibthorp House
Lincoln, Stonebow
Lincoln, Stonebow
Lincoln, Stonebow

The Guildhall and Stonebow date from the 15th century, though much restored.

The Guildhall itself, still the City's Council Chamber, is on the first floor immediately above the arch.

1930s photograph

Lincoln Buildings, Stonebow
Lincoln, The Priory
Lincoln, The Priory
Lincoln, The Priory

More accurately 2 Minster Yard. Mostly dating from 1664-70 though the porch and windows are Victorian. There are 13th and 14th century parts of a great hall remaining.

Undated postcard.

Buildings, Priory
Lincoln, The Lawn
Lincoln, The Lawn
Lincoln, The Lawn

East elevation of the former asylum.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Buildings, Lincoln The Lawn
Lincoln, The Lawn
Lincoln, The Lawn
Lincoln, The Lawn

North elevation of the former asylum.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Buildings, The Lawn
Lincoln, The Lawn
Lincoln, The Lawn
Lincoln, The Lawn

South elevation of the asylum built in 1820.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Buildings, The Lawn
Lincoln, The Lawn
Lincoln, The Lawn
Lincoln, The Lawn

West elevation of the former asylum.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Buildings, The Lawn
Lincoln, Tithe Barn
Lincoln, Tithe Barn
Lincoln, Tithe Barn

The Tithe Barn dating from c1440 stands to the south of Vicars Court in Lincoln, below the cathedral.

It initially served as a warehouse but was probably put to use at some time as an infirmary or refectory.

2005

Lincoln, Tithe Barn, Vicars Court,
Lincoln, Vicar's Court
Lincoln, Vicar's Court
Lincoln, Vicar's Court

This grouping of four two-storeyed buildings lies to the south-east of the Cathedral. This was the college of the Cathedral Vicars Choral.

Most of the buildings date from the fourteenth century though they were badly damaged in the Civil War and were subsequently repaired.

Frith photograph, 1939

Buildings, Lincoln Vicars' Court
Lincoln, Vicars' Court
Lincoln, Vicars' Court
Lincoln, Vicars' Court

This is the south range of Vicars' Court, seen from the gardens (1983).

This was established in the late thirteenth century by Bishop Sutton for a college of Vicars Choral attached to the Cathedral.

Buildings, Vicars' Court
Lincoln, West Hill House
Lincoln, West Hill House
Lincoln, West Hill House

A house on Motherby Hill dating from the mid-eighteenth century.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Buildings, West Hill House
Lincoln, Whitefriars
Lincoln, Whitefriars
Lincoln, Whitefriars

The fifteenth century timber framed building, known as Whitefriars, in Akrill's passage, alongside 333 High Street, was restored by the Lincoln Co-operative Society in 1961.

William Akrill lived in the house and worked there as a baker in the second quarter of the nineteenth century.

Buildings, Akrill's Passage, Lincoln Co-operative Society, William Akrill
Lincoln, Whitefriars
Lincoln, Whitefriars
Lincoln, Whitefriars

It was possible to fully appreciate the south elevation this fine early sixteenth century building when the adjoining property was demolished in 1966.

On the front elevation are to be seen moulded pilasters with bell-bases, moulded fascia, solid window sills with triple roll and cavetto intact.

Buildings, Whitefriars
Lincoln, Wilson's Cottages, Newport
Lincoln, Wilson's Cottages, Newport
Lincoln, Wilson's Cottages, Newport

The stone cottages on Newport, Lincoln, known as Wilson's Cottages, were restored by Lincoln Civic Trust in 1993.

They were opened by H R H The Duke of Gloucester.

Pencil drawing by David Vale, 1993

Lincoln, Newport, Wilson's Cottages, Lincoln Civic Trust, Duke of Gloucester,
Lincoln, YMCA
Lincoln, YMCA
Lincoln, YMCA

Lincoln YMCA pictured in 1978 before Croft Street was extended past the front of the building. Roy Weaver was General Secretary at this date.

The YMCA website states :-

"Lincoln YMCA was founded in 1869 and was based in rooms above Mawer & Collingham’s department store, now Binns.

In 1881 it moved to Guildhall Street, Lincoln in the building now occupied by the Orgasmic Bar.

We moved to new purpose-built accommodation at our present site on St Rumbold’s Street in 1969.

Lincoln YMCA became Lincolnshire YMCA in 2005 when Stamford YMCA joined with us"

http://www.lincsymca.co.uk/about-us/history/ 

DB 1978

Buildings, Lincoln YMCA, Roy Weaver, Saint Rumbold Street, Lincolnshire YMCA, Mawer & Collingham
Scorer, Sam - architect
Scorer, Sam - architect
Scorer, Sam - architect

The garage designed by Sam Scorer on Brayford Wharf, Lincoln, was built in 1959-61 for the Lincolnshire Motor Company as a car showroom

In 1974 it was acquired by Lincolnshire County Council and used as the library headquarters.

Following extensive internal refurbishment, It is now a Prezzo Restaurant.

Buildings, Sam Scorer garage