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Lincoln Transport
 
Lincoln, Avoiding Line
Lincoln, Avoiding Line
Lincoln, Avoiding Line

This bridge, carrying the Lincoln Avoiding Line over the River Witham in the foreground and the drain beyond, behind the garages, was the City’s longest railway bridge. It was 96 metres, (315 feet), long.

The Firth Road premises of what is now Siemens can be seen through and beyond the bridge.

The Avoiding Line opened in 1882 as a railway bypass around the City, part of the route of the Great Eastern and Great Northern Joint Railway carrying trains between East Anglia, to south Yorkshire and beyond.

This part of that route was closed in 1983 and dismantled the following year, at which time this bridge was demolished.

Peter Grey Archive, 1984

IA and Bridges, avoiding line
Lincoln, Avoiding LIne
Lincoln, Avoiding LIne
Lincoln, Avoiding LIne

The Lincoln Avoiding Line opened in 1882 as a railway bypass around the City centre to carry, principally, goods trains.

Using this through trains did not require the closure of the level crossings and trains from most directions could also access the Lincoln Holmes Yard, again avoiding level crossings.

It was closed in 1983 and the route dismantled the following year. Much of the track bed has disappeared under housing and commercial redevelopments.

Peter Grey Archive, 1984

IA and Bridges, avoiding line
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, Greetwell Junction
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, Greetwell Junction
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, Greetwell Junction

The Lincoln Avoiding Line opened in 1882 as a railway bypass around Lincoln City centre.

At its eastern end was Greetwell Junction, the place where the new route connected with the line to Sleaford, also opened in 1882, together with a new line eastwards to link with the line to Boston, opened in 1848.

The Avoiding Line closed in 1983 and in this view the demolition train can be seen in the left background.

Peter Grey Archive, 1984

IA and Bridges, Lincoln avoiding line, Greetwell Junction
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, High Street
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, High Street
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, High Street

For 102 years, 1882 to 1984, the lower end of Lincoln High Street was crossed by this bridge.

It carried the Lincoln Avoiding Line at a high level around the south of the City, providing a route for trains not needing to disrupt traffic by passing over the level crossings in the City centre.

his bridge will be well remembered for the inspired advertising slogan it carried in its later years, shown in this view.

Peter Grey Archive, 1984

IA and Bridges, avoiding line, Lincoln High Street
Lincoln, Central Railway Station,
Lincoln, Central Railway Station,
Lincoln, Central Railway Station,

View from Platform 4 with the St Mary le Wigford Church visible in the background to the left.

DB Cargo 66 051 "Maritime Intermodal Four" passing through the station.

DB 30 July 2019

Lincoln, Central Railway Station,
Lincoln, Central Railway Station, High Street Signal Box
Lincoln, Central Railway Station, High Street Signal Box
Lincoln, Central Railway Station, High Street Signal Box

"High Street Signal Box was built by the Great Northern Railway in 1874.

It is an early surviving example of a GNR box, the oldest being Barnby Moor & Sutton of 1872.

GNR signal boxes were the least standardised of any of the major railway companies because they were often contracted out to local builders.

While the design was broadly set in 1871 - including gabled roofs with elaborate bargeboards and finials - there were many variations in detail and almost every box built in the 1870s was slightly different.

High Street combines the typical gabled roof and finials with unusual fleur-de-lys ridge cresting.

As well as controlling railway signalling, the box controls the level crossing barriers and traffic signals.

In 1925, when the crossing gates were electrified, an extension was built to the west to meet these operational need"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1392292 

No longer in use. 

DB 30 July 2019

Lincoln, Central Station, High Street Signal Box
Lincoln, Central Railway Station, War Memorial
Lincoln, Central Railway Station, War Memorial
Lincoln, Central Railway Station, War Memorial

Now on display at Lincoln Central Railway Station however a plaque beneath explains :-

"The above plaque was originally located at Lincoln St Marks Station and was removed when that Station closed.

A rededication ceremony was performed by the Right Reverend the Bishop of Lincoln on Sunday 5 May 1985"

DB 30 July 2019

Lincoln Central railway station
Lincoln, High Level Crossing
Lincoln, High Level Crossing
Lincoln, High Level Crossing

Level crossings in Lincoln have been the subject of controversy in the City since 1848 when the City Council received a petition expressing concern from a number of townspeople.

Since that time they have been a controversial issue and remain so today.

Details can be found in The Railway History of Lincoln, by Ruddock and Pearson, 1974.

Over the years their number has been reduced but that over the High Street remains.

Here, in 1982, the traditional crossing gates were being replaced with lifting barriers, an improvement to reduce street closure times.

Peter Grey Archive, 1969

IA and Bridges, Lincoln High Street level crossing
Lincoln, Railway Warehouse
Lincoln, Railway Warehouse
Lincoln, Railway Warehouse

The Great Central Railway opened their new warehouse on Holmes Yard on 8 July 1907 but it became surplus to requirements after the Railway Grouping in 1923.

At that time, along with the Great Eastern and the Great Northern Railways in the City they all became part of the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER).

The LNER decided to concentrate their sack hire service to farmers at four locations, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, York and Lincoln and this became the Lincoln sack depot.

It closed in 1963, becoming for some years a builders' merchant, in which guise it is seen here.

It survives today but now as the Library of the University of Lincoln which occupies the site of the former Holmes goods yard.

Peter Grey Archive, c.1980

IA and Bridges, G C R Railway Warehouse, sack depot
Lincoln, Railway Warehouse
Lincoln, Railway Warehouse
Lincoln, Railway Warehouse
An earlier undated photograph of the warehouse on the upper Witham (close to Brayford) when it was still in operation for the railway company.
IA and Bridges, Great Central warehouse
Lincoln, St Mark's Station
Lincoln, St Mark's Station
Lincoln, St Mark's Station

Lincolnshire’s first main railway station, originally called simply Lincoln it was renamed Lincoln St Marks in 1950.

Opened in 1846 and built by the Midland Railway the attractive architecture of the lines buildings was particularly impressive.

It became the City’s main station in 1965 when trains to London were diverted here from the City’s other station.

With major alterations to the railway layout in Lincoln in 1985 it was closed but this building has been successfully converted as part of the shopping centre here and this view is little changed.

Peter Grey Archive, 1981

IA and Bridges, St Mark's Station, Midland railway
Lincoln, St Mark's Station
Lincoln, St Mark's Station
Lincoln, St Mark's Station

IA and Bridges, St Marks station, Lincoln
Lincoln, St Mark's Station
Lincoln, St Mark's Station
Lincoln, St Mark's Station

IA and Bridges, Lincoln St Marks Station
Lincoln, St Mark's Station, Wheelhouse
Lincoln, St Mark's Station, Wheelhouse
Lincoln, St Mark's Station, Wheelhouse

Former Wheelhouse controlling the level crossing gates across High Street.

Central Methodist Church, further down the High Street, just visible at the right hand edge of this image.

Building now occupied by Mr. Chippy. 

DB 30 July 2019 

Lincoln, Saint Mark, Railway, Level Crossing, Wheelhouse
Lincoln, St Mark's Station, Wheelhouse
Lincoln, St Mark's Station, Wheelhouse
Lincoln, St Mark's Station, Wheelhouse

"RAILWAY WHEELHOUSE 

BUILT IN THE 1880's AS ACCOMMODATION FOR THE LEVEL CROSSING KEEPER FOR THE MANCHESTER, SHEFFIELD AND LINCOLNSHIRE RAILWAY.

FROM 1926 IT HOUSED THE MACHINERY AND OPERATOR FOR THE MECHANICALLY OPERATED CROSSING GATES ON THE APPROACH TO THE FORMER LINCOLN ST MARK'S STATION.

THIS USE CEASED IN 1985 WHEN THE RAILWAY CLOSED"

DB 29 July 2019  

Lincoln, Saint Mark, Railway, Level Crossing, Wheelhouse
Lincoln, Tram
Lincoln, Tram
Lincoln, Tram

This undated photograph shows the workers' car of a Lincoln tram passing over the level crossing on High Street by St Mary le Wigford Church, Lincoln.

Streets, tram
Lincoln, Tramway Depot, Newark Road
Lincoln, Tramway Depot, Newark Road
Lincoln, Tramway Depot, Newark Road

Former Tramway Depot on the corner of Newark Road and Ellison Street. 

"The electric tramway system belongs to the Corporation and is being converted (1920) to the overhead trolley system"

"ELECTRIC TRAMWAY Between Lincoln and Bracebridge every few minutes"

"Tramway Depot Stanley Clegg manager"

Directory of the City of Lincoln published by JW Ruddock & Sons in 1919. 

DB 28 January 2019

Lincoln, Tramway Depot