Choose a Topic ....
Photograph Galleries
ABCDEFGHIKLMNOPQRSTUWY
Settlement - Chapels
 
Althorpe, Methodist Chapel
Althorpe, Methodist Chapel
Althorpe, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Althorpe, opened in 1864, is built in contrasting red and pale cream brick.

September 2010


Althorpe, Wesleyan chapel
Ashby by Partney, Methodist Chapel
Ashby by Partney, Methodist Chapel
Ashby by Partney, Methodist Chapel

A Methodist society was first established in this village in 1787. This chapel, the second for the Wesleyans here, was opened in August 1885

September 2015

Ashby by Partney, Wesleyan chapel
Bardney Dairies, Methodist Church
Bardney Dairies, Methodist Church
Bardney Dairies, Methodist Church

This tiny chapel in a remote spot was built for the Wesleyans in 1857. A porch was added in 1957 to mark the centenary of the chapel.

August 2015

See other images of this church



Bardney, Dairies Methodist Church
Bardney, Methodist Church
Bardney, Methodist Church
Bardney, Methodist Church

The current Methodist Church in Church Lane was built in 1903 as the lecture hall and Sunday School for the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel.

The original chapel, which stood behind the current building, was demolished in 1973.

May 2010

Bardney, Wesleyan chapel
Bardney, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Bardney, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Bardney, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The former Primitive Methodist Chapel in Wragby Road was built in 1858, as indicated by the date plaque over the door. It ceased to be used as a chapel in the 1950s.

Pearl Wheatley, 2010

Bardney, Primitive Methodist chapel
Bardney, St Francis RC Church
Bardney, St Francis RC Church
Bardney, St Francis RC Church

In 1945, an agricultural hut in Bardney was converted for temporary use as a church.

This building was never replaced, and is still the village’s Roman Catholic Church.

At one time, St Francis’s served many Irish seasonal workers employed at the nearby sugar beet factory.

April 2011

Bardney, St Francis Roman Catholic Church
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel in Queen Street was the third to be built in Barton. Joseph Wright of Hull was the architect and it opened in March 1868.

Following closure as a Methodist chapel in 1961, it was used by the Salvation Army. Today it is owned by the Queen Street School Preservation Trust and has been refurbished as a community hall. It is known as the Joseph Wright Hall.

September 2017

Barton Upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Joseph Wright Hall
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The interior layout of this chapel, with steeply pitched gallery, prominent pulpit and centrally positioned organ, is typical of large Methodist chapels of the Victorian period.

The recent refurbishment has inserted a new floor at first floor level and developed the upper, gallery area as a space for concerts and performances.

The building is Grade II listed

undated photograph

Barton Upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church
Barton upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church
Barton upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church

This chapel was built for the Wesleyan Methodists in 1861 on the site of an early 19th century chapel.

It was originally named the Wesley Chapel.

March 2016

See other images of this church

Barton Upon Humber, Methodist Church, Wesleyan chapel
Bassingham, Methodist Chapel
Bassingham, Methodist Chapel
Bassingham, Methodist Chapel

The chapel at Bassingham was built for the Wesleyan Methodists in 1839.

It is unexpectedly large (500 'sittings') for a village with a population below 1000.

August 2016

Bassingham, Methodist Chapel, Wesleyan
Bishop Norton, Methodist Chapel
Bishop Norton, Methodist Chapel
Bishop Norton, Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel, Main Street, Bishop Norton, built in 1875, became disused in the 1980s¹ .

It is believed there was an earlier chapel on the same site, probably from the early to mid 19th century.

The iron-work railings have survived along with the foundation stones and date stone.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

 
1. Kingsley, L W, Bishop Norton Methodist Chapel Centenary, 1875-1975, 1975

Bishop Norton, methodist, chapel, primitive,
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church

Centenary Methodist Church in Red Lion Street, Boston, was built by the Wesleyan Methodists in 1839-40 and had an attractive facade with twin towers and a colonnade between them.

The church shown here burnt down on 29 June 1909 but was rebuilt and re-opened in 1911. It is still in use.

Postcard, c1908
Boston, wesleyan, methodist,
Boston, Congregational Church
Boston, Congregational Church
Boston, Congregational Church

The Congregational Church stood in Red Lion Street.

From The Boston Album of Views, c.1900

Boston, Congregational Church
Boston, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Boston, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Boston, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel was in West Street.

Photograph from 'The Boston Album of Views', c.1900

Boston, Primitive methodist chapel
Branston Booths, Methodist Chapel
Branston Booths, Methodist Chapel
Branston Booths, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Chapel and Sunday school in Moor Lane, Branston Booths were built in 1911 to replace an earlier chapel built in 1847. They were converted into a house in 2005.

Pearl Wheatley, 2102

Branston, Booths, Methodist Chapel Wesleyan
Branston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Branston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Branston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Chapel Lane, Branston was built in 1883 at a cost of £1100 next to the previous chapel which became the Sunday school. The lancet windows on the ground floor are as original.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Branston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Brigg, St John Evangelist and Methodist Church
Brigg, St John Evangelist and Methodist Church
Brigg, St John Evangelist and Methodist Church

This view looking east along Bigby Street shows the parish church of St John Evangelist with the post-war church hall in front.

Nearer the camera is the imposing facade of the Methodist Church of 1865. It was built for the Wesleyan Reform Union*, closed for worship in 1962 and demilished in 1966.

* The Wesleyan Reform Union, one of several splinter groups in Methodism, was formed in 1859. Churches were independent and self-governing; they did not join in unions of other branches of the Methodist Church. However, the Brigg WRU chapel became a member of the United Methodist connexion at some date in the second half of the 19th century.

Frith postcard, undated

Brigg, St John Evangelist, Wesleyan Reform Union
Caistor, Independent Chapel
Caistor, Independent Chapel
Caistor, Independent Chapel

This building, now the library of Caistor Grammar School, was originally a Congregational Church erected in 1842.

Distinctive features include yellow brick, Doric pilasters and tapered window and door surrounds.

The town's non-conformist graveyard lies behind.

Ken Redmore, 2010

See other images of this church
Caistor, Independent Congregational Chapel, Caistor Grammar School
Caistor, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Caistor, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Caistor, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This Primitive Methodist chapel was opened in 1868 and a Sunday School added two years later.

The last service was held in 1966 and it was then acquired by the County Council and used as a youth club.

As Caistor Heritage Centre it now houses the town’s library and a popular café.

Drawing by Rex Russell (1916-2104)


Caistor, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Caistor, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Caistor, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Caistor, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The large Wesleyan Methodist Church in Caistor dates from 1842.

Alongside to the left is the former Methodist Primary School (1867-1967).

Ken Redmore, 2010

See other images of this church 

Caistor, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Cherry Willingham, Wesleyan Chapel
Cherry Willingham, Wesleyan Chapel
Cherry Willingham, Wesleyan Chapel

Cherry Willingham Wesleyan Methodist Chapel was built in 1836. The builders paid attention to detail and made this little one-cell chapel decorative.

It is in red brick but has yellow brick trimmings and round headed windows.

The plaque above the door, now gone, was very large for the size of the chapel – what did it say?

The building is well cared for now with its use as the Parish Council Office.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Cherry Willingham, methodist, wesleyan,
Cleethorpes, Beaconthorpe Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, Beaconthorpe Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, Beaconthorpe Methodist Church

This chapel on the corner of Grimsby Road and Tennyson Road was opened by the Primitive Methodists in 1914.

It is a Grade II listed building.

June 2017

Cleethorpes, Beaconthorpe Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, Corpus Christi Catholic Church
Cleethorpes, Corpus Christi Catholic Church
Cleethorpes, Corpus Christi Catholic Church

Corpus Christi church was built in 1995 to replace the original 1930s church which had to be demolished owing to the poor foundation on which it had been built.

June 2017

Cleethorpes, Corpus Christi Roman Catholic Church
Cleethorpes, King's Baptist Church
Cleethorpes, King's Baptist Church
Cleethorpes, King's Baptist Church

This is the site of one of the most devastating Zeppelin raids of World War I. On 1 April 1916 a bomb landed on roof of the Baptist Church Hall where men of the 3rd (Special Reserve) Battalion of the Manchester Regiment were billeted.

Of the men in the building, 27 died instantly and 4 were fatally injured, dying soon after from their wounds.

The current church was founded in February 1988, though the plain brick building dates from an earlier period.

June 2017

Cleethorpes, King's Baptist church, Zeppelin raid
Cleethorpes, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Cleethorpes, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Cleethorpes, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel stood in Mill Road. It was built in 1877 and was demolished in 1979.

The new St Andrew’s Methodist Church is on the same site.

undated postcard

Cleethorpes, Primitive Methodist church
Cleethorpes, St Andrew Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, St Andrew Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, St Andrew Methodist Church

St Andrew’s Methodist chapel on the corner of St Peter’s Avenue and Mill Road was opened in 1979.

It replaced a former Primitive Methodist Chapel on the same site, built in 1877, which developed structural problems and was demolished in 1978.

The current church has buttresses on the north elevation (seen here); perhaps it will suffer the same fate as its predecessor?

June 2017

Cleethorpes, St Andrew Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, Wesleyan Methodist Church

This, the second Wesleyan Methodist chapel on the site in St Peter's Avenue, was opened in 1885. It was known as Trinity.

The church closed in 1968 and was demolished in 1973.

undated postcard

Cleethorpes, Wesleyan Methodist Church, Trinity
Coleby, Methodist Church
Coleby, Methodist Church
Coleby, Methodist Church

The former Wesleyan Methodist chapel in Blind Lane was built in 1903 on the site of previous chapel, built in 1835, which burnt down.

The last service was held here in 1997 and it has since been converted into a dwelling.

April 2017

Coleby, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Coningsby, Baptist Church
Coningsby, Baptist Church
Coningsby, Baptist Church

There is record of a congregation of General Baptists in Coningsby and Tattershall as early as the mid-1600s.

The current building, dating from 1862, is still in active use.

August 2017

Coningsby, baptist church
Coningsby, Moorside, Methodist Chapel
Coningsby, Moorside, Methodist Chapel
Coningsby, Moorside, Methodist Chapel
Coningsby, Moorside Wesleyan Methodist Church chapel
Cowbit, Methodist Chapel
Cowbit, Methodist Chapel
Cowbit, Methodist Chapel

The foundation stone for this Methodist chapel, which over the years served more than one branch of the denomination, was laid in July 1912.

It closed in 1983 and has since been converted into a house.

September 2017

Cowbit, Methodist chapel
Crowle, Baptist Chapel
Crowle, Baptist Chapel
Crowle, Baptist Chapel

The Baptist church in Crowle dates from 1879.

Built of rendered brick with quoins and arched windows, the building is described by Pevsner as ‘remarkable conservative’.  Possibly it incorporates the earlier building of 1820.

Following closure in 2010, the church, together with its adjacent graveyard, has been for sale.

Ken Redmore, 2011

Crowle, Baptist Church Chapel
Eagle, Methodist Church
Eagle, Methodist Church
Eagle, Methodist Church

The red-brick chapel in High Street was built for the Wesleyan Methodists in 1903. It closed in 1981 and has been converted to residential use.

October 2016

Eagle, Methodist Chapel Wesleyan
Eastville, St Jude
Eastville, St Jude
Eastville, St Jude

St Jude’s Mission Room, with war memorial and Women’s Institute, Eastville.

Postcard, 1930s

Eastville, St Jude mission room, Women's Institute
Epworth, Kilham Memorial Methodist Chapel
Epworth, Kilham Memorial Methodist Chapel
Epworth, Kilham Memorial Methodist Chapel

Alexander Kilham (1762-1798) was born in Epworth, son of a linen weaver, and achieved fame as founder of the Methodist New Connexion.

This branch of the church joined others to form the United Methodist Church in 1907 which in turn became part of the one Methodist Church in 1932.

This chapel in High Street, opposite the Wesley Memorial Methodist Church, was built as a memorial to Kilham in 1860. It was converted for use as Epworth's Youth Centre in 1944.

The building is Grade II listed.

October 2016

 

Epworth, Kilham Methodist Chapel, Alexander Kilham, Epworth Youth Centre
Epworth, Wesley Memorial Methodist Church
Epworth, Wesley Memorial Methodist Church
Epworth, Wesley Memorial Methodist Church

This impressive building was built in 1889 by Charles Bell* on a spacious site along with school rooms, a manse and a caretaker's house.

This is the north front and main entrance to the church.

October 2016

* Charles Bell ARIBA (1846-1899) was born and educated in Grantham. His architectural practice was in London and he built more than 60 Methodist chapels.

Epworth, Wesley Methodist Memorial Church
Ewerby, Methodist Chapel
Ewerby, Methodist Chapel
Ewerby, Methodist Chapel

This Primitive Methodist chapel, built of distinctive local bricks, was opened in 1879 and closed in 1981.

It is now a dwelling known as ‘Chapel House’.

June 2017
Ewerby, Methodist chapel Primitive
Faldingworth, Methodist Church
Faldingworth, Methodist Church
Faldingworth, Methodist Church

The Methodist Chapel in Main Street, Faldingworth was built in 1897 on the site of the earlier chapel of 1828.

It was designed by Frederick Whittaker Dixon of Oldham, Lancashire (1854-1935). It closed and was sold in 2016.

June 2016

See other images of this church

Faldingworth, Methodist Church, Frederick Whittaker Dixon
Fillingham, Methodist Chapel
Fillingham, Methodist Chapel
Fillingham, Methodist Chapel

The former chapel (now a house named ‘Pateley’) in Chapel Road was built in 1859 or 1864.

The last service was held in October 1967.

May 2011

Fillingham, Methodist Chapel
Firsby, Methodist Chapel
Firsby, Methodist Chapel
Firsby, Methodist Chapel

Firsby’s Wesleyan Methodist chapel in Fendyke Road opened in 1903.

July 2016

Firsby, Methodist Chapel Wesleyan
Fiskerton, Methodist Chapel
Fiskerton, Methodist Chapel
Fiskerton, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Chapel Road was built in 1839 in gault brick and converted into a house with new windows in 1967.

The defaced plaque is still there on the gable end to the left (not visible in this photograph).

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Fiskerton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, gault brick
Friskney, Methodist Chapel
Friskney, Methodist Chapel
Friskney, Methodist Chapel

The main Wesleyan Chapel in Chapel Lane (off the Friskney Eaudyke). A plaque above the doorway is inscribed "Wesleyan Centenary Chapel 1839".

A single storey Sunday School Building was added to the right of the Chapel (as viewed in the photograph) in 1951. It ceased to be used as a chapel in 2006.

Postcard c1940?

Friskney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Frithville, Methodist Chapel
Frithville, Methodist Chapel
Frithville, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan chapel in Frithville, opened in 1899, is now disused and marooned in the huge yard of the local agricultural engineer (R H Crawford).

August 2017

Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gainsborough, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Gainsborough, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Gainsborough, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel was built in Beaumont Street in 1877. It is described by Pevsner as 'debased Frenchy-Italian'.

From the Album of Gainsboro’ Views published by Amcoats & Co, Booksellers, Stationers & Printers, Lord Street, Gainsborough, c.1900?

 

Gainsborough, Primitive Methodist chapel
Garthorpe, Wesleyan Chapel
Garthorpe, Wesleyan Chapel
Garthorpe, Wesleyan Chapel

The Methodist chapel in Garthorpe was enlarged in 1883 and an adjoining Sunday School (on the left) was built in 1888.

The chapel closed in 2010 and has recently been for sale.

2011


Garthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gedney Hill, Baptist Church
Gedney Hill, Baptist Church
Gedney Hill, Baptist Church

The chapel on Hillgate was opened for worship by the General Baptists in 1883. It was sold in 2010 and has since been converted for domestic use.

September 2017

Gedney Hill, Baptist chapel church
Glentham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Glentham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Glentham, Primitive Methodist Chapel

There is very little of the original structure of the former Primitive Methodist Chapel on the High Street surviving. It was built in 1876.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Glentham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Glentham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Glentham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Glentham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Caenby Road also served, at a later date, as the Caenby Institute. It was built in 1911.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Glentham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gosberton, Methodist Chapel
Gosberton, Methodist Chapel
Gosberton, Methodist Chapel

Gosberton, Methodist Chapel
Grantham, Finkin Street Methodist Church
Grantham, Finkin Street Methodist Church
Grantham, Finkin Street Methodist Church

This church, now known as Christ Church, was built for the Wesleyan Methodists in 1840.

The Methodists were joined in the building in 2011 by the local United Reformed Church and the new name was adopted at that date.

April 2011

See other images of this church

 

Grantham, Finkin Street Methodist Church, Christ Church
Great Steeping, Monksthorpe Baptist Church
Great Steeping, Monksthorpe Baptist Church
Great Steeping, Monksthorpe Baptist Church

This simple brick chapel was erected in 1701.  Originally thatched, the roof was tiled in 1847.

Regular worship ceased in the 1970s but occasional services are held.

It is owned by the National Trust.

Frank Robinson, 2010

Great Steeping, baptist chapel, national trust
Grimsby, Central Hall
Grimsby, Central Hall
Grimsby, Central Hall

Grimsby Central Hall on Duncombe Street was opened in 1936 by the Methodist Church as a place of worship and community centre.

It has always been a concert venue too and still hosts a wide range of recitals and productions.

June 2017

Grimsby, Central Hall
Grimsby, Salvation Army Citadel
Grimsby, Salvation Army Citadel
Grimsby, Salvation Army Citadel

The Salvation Army Citadel is on Duncombe Street.

June 2017

Grimsby, Salvation Army citadel
Grimsby, St Mary at Sea, Roman Catholic Church
Grimsby, St Mary at Sea, Roman Catholic Church
Grimsby, St Mary at Sea, Roman Catholic Church

This is the Roman Catholic Parish Church of Grimsby; it is situated on the corner of Heneage Road and Wellington Street.

The church was designed by Matthew Hadfield and opened in 1883

June 2017

Grimsby, St Mary at Sea R C church, Matthew Hadfield
Grimsby, Synagogue
Grimsby, Synagogue
Grimsby, Synagogue

Many Eastern European immigrants passed through Grimsby in the late 19th century. Some, however, stayed, and the Jewish population of the town increased.

The Sir Moses Montefiore Synagogue was consecrated in 1888 and was built ‘in a Byzantine style’ on land given by Edward Heneage MP.

Frank Robinson, December 2014

Grimsby, synagogue, Sir Moses Montefiore, Edward Heneage
Grimsby, Welholme Galleries
Grimsby, Welholme Galleries
Grimsby, Welholme Galleries

Built in 1907 by architects Bell, Withers and Meredith as a Congregational Church, it later became the Welholme Galleries.

Since 2004 it has been in use as a store by Grimsby Borough Council.

June 2017


Grimsby, Welholme Galleries, Congregational, Bell, Withers Meredith
Hackthorn, Methodist Chapel
Hackthorn, Methodist Chapel
Hackthorn, Methodist Chapel

The chapel in Hackthorn opened in September 1869; the Sunday School was added in 1881.

The last service was in the 1980s and it is now used as an office by Hackthorn Estate.

December 2015

Hackthorn, Methodist Chapel
Hainton, Roman Catholic Chapel
Hainton, Roman Catholic Chapel
Hainton, Roman Catholic Chapel

The Roman Catholic Chapel of St Francis de Sales at Hainton was built of yellow brick in 1836 to a design by E. J. Willson for Frances, wife of George Fieschi Heneage.

Willson's tomb is in the graveyard at the parish church of St Mary nearby.

Mark Acton, 2015

Hainton, Roman Catholic chapel. St FRancis de Sales, George Fieschi Heneage, E J Willson
Haxey, Methodist Chapel
Haxey, Methodist Chapel
Haxey, Methodist Chapel

The foundation stone for this chapel was laid in 1909.  A new organ was installed in 1949.

September 2010

Haxey, Methodist Chapel
Helpringham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Helpringham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Helpringham, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This was the second chapel built for the Primitive Methodists on this site on the Green. It cost £350 and was dedicated in 1883.

June 2017

Helpringham, Primitive Methodist chapel
Holbeach Drove, Methodist Church
Holbeach Drove, Methodist Church
Holbeach Drove, Methodist Church

This small chapel was opened by the Wesleyan Methodists in February 1833 and remains in use.

September 2017

Holbeach Drove, Methodist chapel Wesleyan
Horncastle, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Horncastle, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Horncastle, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The former Primitive Methodist chapel at the end of Prospect Street close to West Street was opened in 1854 and closed in 1961.

It was the third Primitive Methodist chapel to be built in the town.

April 2014

Horncastle, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Immingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Immingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Immingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This chapel in Pelham Road was opened by the Primitive Methodists in 1911, replacing an earlier one on the same site built in 1856.

Two other Methodist societies in the village joined the local congregation to form a new society here in 1965.

Undated postcard

Immingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Free Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Free Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Free Methodist Chapel

The former Free United Methodist Chapel was built in 1854 and remained in use until the 1950s. It is now a house with changed fenestration.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Ingham, Frewe Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel on The Green is now Chapel House. It was built 1838 and converted to a house in the 1960s.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011


Ingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This is possibly the Sunday School of the former Wesleyan Chapel, built 1836. It is now a community hall.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011


Ingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keadby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keadby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keadby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This chapel was opened for the Wesleyan Methodists in 1861 and the Sunday School was added in 1885.

The chapel closed for worship in 1960.

September 2010

Keadby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keelby, Methodist Chapel
Keelby, Methodist Chapel
Keelby, Methodist Chapel

This chapel in Yarborough Road was the third to be built by the Wesleyans in Keelby.

It was designed by Pearson Bellamy of Lincoln and was opened in 1867. It was enlarged in 1897.

July 2014

Keelby, Methodist Chapel, Pearson Bellamy, Wesleyan
Kirton Holme, Methodist Chapel
Kirton Holme, Methodist Chapel
Kirton Holme, Methodist Chapel

Kirton Holme is a secondary settlement in the extreme northwest corner of the parish, approximately 3 miles from the village centre.

The Methodist Church is a short distance from the A52.

September 2011

Kirton in Holland, Methodist Chapel
Kirton in Holland, Chapel
Kirton in Holland, Chapel
Kirton in Holland, Chapel

Kirton's Methodist Chapel is on the west side of the main street in the centre of the village.

Pale rock-faced stone has been used on the facade facing the street; the rest of the building is constructed in less fashionable local red  brick.

September 2011

Kirton in Holland, chapel
Kirton in Lindsey, Methodist Church
Kirton in Lindsey, Methodist Church
Kirton in Lindsey, Methodist Church

The Wesleyan Methodist Church in West Street opened in 1840 and was enlarged in 1875.

June 2013

See other images of this church

Kirton Lindsey, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Langworth, Methodist Chapel
Langworth, Methodist Chapel
Langworth, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel on Scothern Road was built in 1819, probably as a partial rebuild on the site of an earlier chapel.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Langworth, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Legsby, Bleasby Moor, Methodist Chapel
Legsby, Bleasby Moor, Methodist Chapel
Legsby, Bleasby Moor, Methodist Chapel

Former Free United Methodist Chapel on Bleasby Moor (in the parish of Legsby) was built in 1870 and converted into a house about 1970.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Legsby, Bleasby Moor, Free United Methodist Chapel
Lincoln, Baptist Chapel, Mint Street
Lincoln, Baptist Chapel, Mint Street
Lincoln, Baptist Chapel, Mint Street

The Italianate former Baptist Church at the southern end of Mint Street was built in 1870 by architects Drury and Mortimer.

It is currently in use an estate agents' office. There is a small enclosed graveyard to the rear.

Pearl Wheatley, 2016

Chapels, Mint Street Baptist Chapel, Drury and Mortimer
Lincoln, Central Methodist Church
Lincoln, Central Methodist Church
Lincoln, Central Methodist Church

This church, with its adjoining Sunday school, theatre and meeting rooms, was built in 1905 by Howdill & Sons of Leeds in Baroque Revival style.

It is constructed in red brick with ashlar dressings, and slate roofs.

2012

See other images of this church
Chapels, Lincoln, Central Methodist Church, Howdill & Sons.
Lincoln, Gresham Street, Congregational Chapel
Lincoln, Gresham Street, Congregational Chapel
Lincoln, Gresham Street, Congregational Chapel

The former Congregational Church on Gresham Street was built in 1867 with the Sunday School added by 1905.

Later uses included a factory but by 2010 it housed a surgery, a dwelling and offices.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Chapels, Gresham Street, Congregational Church Chapel
Lincoln, Indpendent Chapel, Newland
Lincoln, Indpendent Chapel, Newland
Lincoln, Indpendent Chapel, Newland

The former Independent Chapel on Newland of 1840 is by James Fenton.

It was used as a British School in the 1870s and in 1876 Bellamy and Hardy built a Congregational chapel on the adjacent site.

Pearl Wheatley, 2016

Chapels, Lincoln Independent Chapel, James Fenton, Bellamy & Hardy
Lincoln, St Catherine Methodist Church
Lincoln, St Catherine Methodist Church
Lincoln, St Catherine Methodist Church

This chapel was opened in 1888. (The schoolroom behind had opened two years earlier.) The tower was added in 1908/09.

The last service at St Catherine’s was in August 1977. It is now a heritage and cultural centre.

September 2014

See other images of this church 

Chapels, Lincoln, St Catherine Methodist Church
Lincoln, Unitarian Chapel
Lincoln, Unitarian Chapel
Lincoln, Unitarian Chapel

The Unitarian chapel was built on Lincoln's High Street in the early eighteenth century, altered in 1819, with late-nineteenth century additions.

It is built of brick, rendered, with stone dressings and hipped slate roof with a single stack.

The west front on High Street has a central stone porch with pediment and ball finials.

See other images of this church
Chapels, Lincoln, Unitarian Chapwl
Lincoln, Wesley Chapel, Clasketgate
Lincoln, Wesley Chapel, Clasketgate
Lincoln, Wesley Chapel, Clasketgate

The Wesleyan Chapel on Clasketgate was built in 1836 to cater for the growing popularity of Methodism in the City.

Designed by W A Nicholson in neo-classical style, and with a grand entrance portico, the chapel could seat 1400 people.

Affectionately known as ‘Big Wesley’, it was for many years the largest Wesleyan church in Lincoln.  It was closed in 1961 and demolished two years later.

Photograph from the book to mark the chapel's centenary, 1936.

Chapels, Lincoln, Big Wesley, Clasketgate
Lincoln, West Parade, Methodist Chapel
Lincoln, West Parade, Methodist Chapel
Lincoln, West Parade, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Chapel at the corner of Gresham Street and West Parade was built about 1907. It was converted to dwellings in 2015.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Chapels, West Parade, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Linwood, Methodist Chapel
Linwood, Methodist Chapel
Linwood, Methodist Chapel

This 'tin' chapel (corrugated iron on a structural timber frame) was erected for the Primitive Methodists in 1923.

The last service was held in 1959 and it was sold in 1965 but now appears to be totally disused.

April 2017

Linwood, Methodist chapel
Lissington, Methodist Chapel
Lissington, Methodist Chapel
Lissington, Methodist Chapel

The Free Methodist Chapel in Lissington was built in 1863. It is believed to be the site of an earlier chapel.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Lissington, Free Methodist Chapel
Louth, Independent Chapel
Louth, Independent Chapel
Louth, Independent Chapel

The Independent Chapel in Cannon Street was built 1828, superseding the former Countess of Huntingdon Chapel bought in 1800.

It was taken out of use 1928, first becoming a cinema, then offices.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Louth, Independent Chapel, Cannon Street, Countess of Huntingdon
Luddington, Roman Catholic Chapel
Luddington, Roman Catholic Chapel
Luddington, Roman Catholic Chapel

The church was built in 1877 to serve the population of poor and mainly Irish agricultural workers who arrived in the Isle of Axholme in the wake of the potato famine in the 1840s.

It was dedicated to St Joseph and St Dymphna by the Norbertines, who had established themselves at nearby Crowle in 1872.

Luddington, Roman Catholic, St Joseph, St Dymphna, Irish
Mareham le Fen, Methodist Chapel
Mareham le Fen, Methodist Chapel
Mareham le Fen, Methodist Chapel

This Wesleyan Methodist chapel on the corner of Main Road and Chapel Lane was opened in 1891.

The building became unsafe and had to be demolished in 1994, after which time the congregation met in the schoolroom at the rear of the site.

undated postcard

Mareham le Fen, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Market Rasen, Methodist Church
Market Rasen, Methodist Church
Market Rasen, Methodist Church

The Methodist Church at Market Rasen was built in 1863.

The interior is largely unchanged, and still retains its original numbered box pews, a double-decker pulpit and a beautiful oval gallery.

Frank Robinson, 2010

See other images of this church
Market Rasen, Methodist Church Chapel
Metheringham, Methodist Chapel
Metheringham, Methodist Chapel
Metheringham, Methodist Chapel

This chapel opened in May 1908 and is still in use. It was the fourth Wesleyan Methodist chapel to be built in the village.

March 2016

Metheringham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Middle Rasen, Gainsborough Road
Middle Rasen, Gainsborough Road
Middle Rasen, Gainsborough Road

The former Wesleyan Chapel occupies a prominent positon on the corner of Gainsborough Road and Mill Lane.

It was opened in 1911 on the site of a public house, ‘The Brown Cow’.

undated postcard c.1950

Middle Rasen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Brown Cow
Minting, Methodist Chapel
Minting, Methodist Chapel
Minting, Methodist Chapel

This former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Mill Lane was built in 1892. It is now used as a tyre store.

Pearl Wheatley, 2013

Minting, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Moulton Chapel, Methodist Chapel
Moulton Chapel, Methodist Chapel
Moulton Chapel, Methodist Chapel

A chapel was erected here in Fen Gate in 1812 and was later used as a Sunday School for the new chapel built in front of it in 1902.

September 2017

Moulton Chapel, Methodist Chapel
Navenby, Methodist Church
Navenby, Methodist Church
Navenby, Methodist Church

The Methodist Church in Navenby is well-positioned towards the north end of the village on the A607 Lincoln - Grantham road.

June 2015

See other images of this church


Navenby, Methodist Church
Nettleton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The former Primitive Methodist Chapel in Church Street, Nettleton was built about 1860 and was still in use in the 1950s.

Originally there were four bays. The porch is still there behind the chapel.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Nettleton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Church Street, Nettleton was built 1848 with a Sunday School at the rear built in 1912.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Nettleton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This fine building, at the junction of Dogdyke Road and Langrick Road, was opened as a Wesleyan Methodist chapel in September 1872.

It replaced an earlier building of 1848 which had become unsafe.

July 2017

New York, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Newton on Trent, Methodist Chapel
Newton on Trent, Methodist Chapel
Newton on Trent, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Newton opened in November 1895.

Following closure it was converted into a dwelling and sold in 2015

September 2017

Newton on Trent, Methodist Wesleyan Chapel
Normanby by Spital, Free Methodist Chapel
Normanby by Spital, Free Methodist Chapel
Normanby by Spital, Free Methodist Chapel

This large chapel at the corner of Chapel Lane was built for the Free Methodists in 1864 and later used by United Methodists.

It is Grade II listed and has been converted into a dwelling.

June 2017

Normanby By Spital, Free Methodist Chapel
Normanby by Spital, Methodist Chapel
Normanby by Spital, Methodist Chapel
Normanby by Spital, Methodist Chapel

The former Non-Conformist Chapel in Front Street was built in 1813 and enlarged in 1825 and 1845. By 1856 it belonged to the Free Methodists; it closed in 1862.

Other chapels were built in the village but date stones on this one notes 1861 and 1867. There lies the mystery.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Normanby By Spital, Free Methodist Chapel
North Kelsey, Methodist Chapel
North Kelsey, Methodist Chapel
North Kelsey, Methodist Chapel

The first Wesleyan Methodist chapel in North Kelsey was built in 1796, the second in 1848.

This in turn was replaced by the present building in Chapel Street in 1897.

May 2016

North Kelsey, Methodist chapel
North Owersby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This former Methodist Chapel (presumably for the Primitives) was rebuilt in 1856 in place of one 1837. It had originally had three bays; later it was used as the village post office.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

North Owersby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, United Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, United Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, United Methodist Chapel

The former United Methodist Chapel in North Owersby was built 1881 and fell from use 1936.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

North Owersby, United Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Thornton Road was built in 1908 superseding one of 1856.It is now a domestic property.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

North Owersby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
North Scarle, Methodist Church
North Scarle, Methodist Church
North Scarle, Methodist Church

A chapel opened by the Wesleyan Methodists in 1900 in High Street, now used as the parish hall.

October 2016

North Scarle, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
North Somercotes, Methodist Chapel
North Somercotes, Methodist Chapel
North Somercotes, Methodist Chapel
The Methodist chapel in North Somercotes, originally opened by the Wesleyans.
North Somercotes, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Owmby by Spital, Methodist Chapel
Owmby by Spital, Methodist Chapel
Owmby by Spital, Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel on Normanby Road, Owmby by Spital, was built in 1903 and in use as a doctor’s surgery when this photograph was taken.

Pearl Wheatley, 2010

Owmby by Spital, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Potterhanworth, Methodist Church
Potterhanworth, Methodist Church
Potterhanworth, Methodist Church

The foundation stone for this chapel in Barff Road was laid in 1888. A hall for the Sunday School and community use was opened in 1962.

July 2011


Potterhanworth, Methodist Church
Raithby by Spilsby, Methodist Chapel
Raithby by Spilsby, Methodist Chapel
Raithby by Spilsby, Methodist Chapel

This is one of the most important chapels in Methodism and the oldest in Lincolnshire.

John Wesley himself opened the chapel above the stables of Raithby Hall in 1779.

It is a Grade I listed building.

July 2012

See other images of this church

Raithby By Spilsby, Methodist Chapel, John Wesley, Stables
Reepham, Methodist Chapel
Reepham, Methodist Chapel
Reepham, Methodist Chapel

This Wesleyan Methodist chapel, on High Street at the corner of Chapel Lane, was opened in 1894.

July 2016

Reepham, Methodist Chapel
Scothern, Methodist Chapel
Scothern, Methodist Chapel
Scothern, Methodist Chapel

The first Methodist Chapel in the village was built by the Wesleyans in 1823.

It was replaced by the current building on Main Street in 1858.

September 2016

See another image of this church 

Scothern, Methodist chapel, wesleyans
Scotter, West Street
Scotter, West Street
Scotter, West Street

This chapel on the right was opened by the Primitive Methodists in 1819 and then sold to the Methodist New Connexion in c.1849.

This society later became United Methodist and, after a schoolroom was added, the chapel was re-faced in 1901.

The last service was held in 1948 and it was sold for use as a warehouse. The building was demolished in 1971.

early 20th century postcard

Scotter, Primitive Methodist chapel, United methodist, New Connexion
Scredington, Methodist Chapel
Scredington, Methodist Chapel
Scredington, Methodist Chapel

The chapel in Main Street was opened by the Wesleyan Methodists in 1875, replacing a chapel of 1840 on the same site.

It closed for worship in 1982 and has since been converted into a house.

June 2017

Scredington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Scunthorpe, Primitive Methodist Church
Scunthorpe, Primitive Methodist Church
Scunthorpe, Primitive Methodist Church

Ther Primitive Methodist Chapel on Frodingham Road, Scunthorpe.

postcard published by Bartle Brothers of Scunthorpe, c.1910

Scunthorpe, Primitive Methodist Church
Scunthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Scunthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Scunthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Church

The Wesleyan Methodist chapel and Sunday schools were built on High Street in 1900 at a cost of £7400.

postcard published by Bartle Brothers of Scunthorpe, undated

Scunthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Bartle brothers
Skegness, Methodist Church
Skegness, Methodist Church
Skegness, Methodist Church

The site of the Methodist Chapel in Algitha Road was given by the Earl of Scarbrough and the chapel was built for £1800 in 1882.

Seating in the chapel was for 600 (at a time when the population of the town was only 1358).

The front and east walls of the chapel (seen here) were seriously damaged in an air raid on Skegness on 16 February 1941. Full repairs, costing £3250, were delayed until the late 1940s.

December 2012

Skegness, Methodist Church, Algitha Road, Earl of Scarbrough, air raid
Sleaford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Sleaford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Sleaford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Chapel in Northgate opened in 1848. It was replaced by a new building on the same site in 1972.

Postcard posted in 1908

Sleaford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Snitterby, Methodist Chapel
Snitterby, Methodist Chapel
Snitterby, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Chapel in Chapel Lane was built in 1840 and is now converted into a dwelling.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Snitterby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
South Kelsey, Methodist Church
South Kelsey, Methodist Church
South Kelsey, Methodist Church

This neat building on the east side of Brigg Road was opened in 1877.

May 2016

South Kelsey, Methodist Church chapel
South Witham, Chapel
South Witham, Chapel
South Witham, Chapel

The inscription in the gable end reads 'Home Missionary Chapel erected 1853' and below on the string course is 'and British School'.

September 2010

South Witham, chapel
Southrey, Methodist Chapel
Southrey, Methodist Chapel
Southrey, Methodist Chapel

Southrey’s Wesleyan Methodist Chapel was built in 1838.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Southrey, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Spilsby, Methodist Church
Spilsby, Methodist Church
Spilsby, Methodist Church

The Methodist Chapel in Spilsby (originally the Wesleyan Chapel) has a prominent location at the east end of the Market Place.

It was built in 1878 by Charles Bell* of stock brick with Geometrical tracery, a typical town chapel of its period.

July 2014

See other images of this church

* Charles Bell ARIBA (1846-1899) was born and educated in Grantham. His architectural practice was in London and he built more than 60 Methodist chapels.

Spilsby, Methodist Church, Charles Bell
Spridlington, Methodist Chapel
Spridlington, Methodist Chapel
Spridlington, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel at Spridlington dates from the late 19th century, probably replacing one built in 1838.

Pearl Wheatley, 2010

Spridlington, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Stainton le Vale, Methodist Chapel
Stainton le Vale, Methodist Chapel
Stainton le Vale, Methodist Chapel

The building, now used as the village hall, was originally a Primitive Methodist Chapel.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Stainton le Vale, Primitive Methodist Chapel, village hall
Stamford, Methodist Church
Stamford, Methodist Church
Stamford, Methodist Church

This church, built of local stone, opened in 1886 on the site of No.11 Barn Hill, immediately in front of the older church (which was retained for the Sunday School). The cost was approximately £3000.

September 2014

Stamford, Methodist Church, Barn Hill
Sutton St Edmund, Methodist Chapel
Sutton St Edmund, Methodist Chapel
Sutton St Edmund, Methodist Chapel

Erected in 1870 and closed in 1970, the chapel is now in use as a dwelling on Broadgate.

September 2017

Sutton St Edmund, Methodist chapel
Sutton St James, Baptist Church
Sutton St James, Baptist Church
Sutton St James, Baptist Church

The General Baptist Chapel is in Chapel Gate and remains in active use.

September 2017

Sutton St James, Baptist church chapel
Swinderby, Methodist Chapel
Swinderby, Methodist Chapel
Swinderby, Methodist Chapel

This former Wesleyan Methodist chapel was built in 1869 at a cost of about £600.

It is currently used for worship by the Newark Christian Fellowship under the name 'Light and Life Missions'.

August 2016

See other images of this church


Swinderby, Methodist Chapel
Tealby, Methodist Chapel
Tealby, Methodist Chapel
Tealby, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist chapel in Front Street opened in 1819 and closed in 1993.

It is listed Grade II.

July 2017

Tealby, Methodist chapel
Tetney Lock, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Tetney Lock, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Tetney Lock, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The former Primitive Methodist chapel opened in 1864 and closed in 1954. It is now a dwelling, ‘The Old Chapel House’.

June 2012

Tetney, Lock, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Thorpe on the Hill, Methodist Chapel
Thorpe on the Hill, Methodist Chapel
Thorpe on the Hill, Methodist Chapel

The John Hunt Memorial Chapel was built by the Wesleyan Methodists in 1909, providing space for a congregation of 120. It cost £850 to build.

The building, now converted for residential occupation, occupies a prominent position in the centre of the village. Its bright red brick with cream brick and painted stone details makes a striking front facade.

August 2016

See other images of this church

Thorpe on the Hill, Methodist Chapel, John Hunt
Thurlby, Methodist Chapel
Thurlby, Methodist Chapel
Thurlby, Methodist Chapel

This, the former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, was built in 1912 at a cost of £800 with seating for 350.

September 2014

Thurlby by Bourne, Methodist Chapel
Toynton All Saints, Methodist Chapel
Toynton All Saints, Methodist Chapel
Toynton All Saints, Methodist Chapel

This former Wesleyan Methodist chapel, built in 1860, has been converted into a dwelling.

The adjoining Sunday School, also part of today’s house, was opened in 1939.

July 2014

Toynton All Saints, Methodist Chapel Wesleyan
Toynton All Saints, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Toynton All Saints, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Toynton All Saints, Primitive Methodist Chapel

Toynton Fen Side Primitive Methodist Chapel, in the parish of Toynton All Saints, was built in 1867 and closed in 1960.

Mark Acton, 2017

Toynton All Saints, Primitive Methodist Chapel , Fen Side
Ulceby with Fordington, Methodist Chapel
Ulceby with Fordington, Methodist Chapel
Ulceby with Fordington, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Chapel at Ulceby is on the A1028 in the centre of the village.

September 2015

Ulceby with Fordington, Methodist Chapel
Waddingham, Methodist Chapel
Waddingham, Methodist Chapel
Waddingham, Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel in Silver Street, Waddingham, was built in 1839 and was extended later.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Waddingham, Primitive Methodist chapel
Wainfleet All Saints, Mewthodist Chapel
Wainfleet All Saints, Mewthodist Chapel
Wainfleet All Saints, Mewthodist Chapel

The chapel on St Johns Street is the third built for the Wesleyan Methodists on this site.

The first was erected in 1804, the second in 1820 and the third, the present one, opened in 1902.

postcard, dated 1915

Wainfleet All Saints, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Washingborough, Free Methodist Chapel
Washingborough, Free Methodist Chapel
Washingborough, Free Methodist Chapel

This is the earlier of two chapels standing side by side on Main Road; it was built in 1857 and was retained for use as the Sunday school.

January 2017

Washingborough, Free Methodist Chapel
Washingborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Washingborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Washingborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This chapel, also built for the Free Methodists (later the United Methodists), was erected in 1882.

Additional rooms and ‘modern facilities’ have been added over the years.

January 2017

Washingborough, Methodist Chapel Wesleyan
Welton Hill, Methodist Chapel
Welton Hill, Methodist Chapel
Welton Hill, Methodist Chapel

The former Free Methodist chapel was built alongside the A46 two miles north-east of Welton in 1866.

It is an attractive small building in red and pale yellow brick with dog-tooth decoration on the front elevation.

August 2011

Welton Hill, Methodist Church Chapel, Free Methodist
Welton, Methodist Church
Welton, Methodist Church
Welton, Methodist Church

The chapel in Welton opened in 1815 and a Sunday School room was in 1898.

August 2011

Welton, Methodist Chapel
Welton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Welton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Welton, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel, at Ryland in Welton, was built in 1839 and is currently used as a garage.

Pearl Wheatley, 2010

Welton, Ryland, Primitive methodist chapel
West Torrington, Methodist Chapel
West Torrington, Methodist Chapel
West Torrington, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist chapel here was built in 1859.

August 2015

See other images of this church

West Torrington, Methodist Chapel
Wickenby, Free Methodist Chapel
Wickenby, Free Methodist Chapel
Wickenby, Free Methodist Chapel

This chapel for the Free Methodists (later United Methodists) was opened in May 1878 and the last service held in December 1967.

It was sold for youth drama work in 1970 and is now the Broadbent Theatre, home of the Lindsey Rural Players.

April 2017

Wickenby, Free methodist Chapel, Broadbent Theatre
Willoughton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Willoughton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Willoughton, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Hollowgate Hill Methodist Chapel was built in 1867 to serve in the Scotter Primitive Methodist Circuit, and replaced an earlier chapel of 1837.

The chapel closed in 1979 and has now been converted into apartments.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Willoughton, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Hollowgate Hill
Wood Enderby, Methodist Chapel
Wood Enderby, Methodist Chapel
Wood Enderby, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Methodist chapel in Wood Enderby was built at the crossroads in the centre of the village in 1876, with a Sunday school added in 1898.

The last service was held in 1973.

August 2017

Wood Enderby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Woodhall Spa, Methodist Church
Woodhall Spa, Methodist Church
Woodhall Spa, Methodist Church

The striking red-brick chapel on Broadway opened in 1907, costing about £4000.

In the 1990s the chapel was sold for business use and the ancillary buildings to the rear on Iddesleigh Road were adapted for worship and other church and community activities.

August 2013

Woodhall Spa, Methodist Church