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Settlement - Schools and Colleges
 
Alford, Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School
Alford, Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School
Alford, Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School

The original school building on West Street,

 Undated postcard

Alford, Grammar School
Bishop Norton, School
Bishop Norton, School
Bishop Norton, School

The Old School, Main Street, Bishop Norton, was built in 1872¹.

It has an unusual patterned slate roof and tile decoration over one window.

Like many schools at this time the builders paid much attention to details. The bellcote remains intact.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

 

1. Stopp, P, Lincolnshire: A Parish History: Bishop Norton, 1986

Bishop Norton, school,
Branston, Old Infants School
Branston, Old Infants School
Branston, Old Infants School

The building occupying Nos 9 and 11 Hall Lane was originally an Infants School built by Hon A S Leslie Melville of Branston Hall.

It opened in 1837 for 70 children and, like other schools of the period, was supported by voluntary contributions.

June 2013

Branston, infants school, A S Leslie Melville
Brothertoft, Old School
Brothertoft, Old School
Brothertoft, Old School

The first school at Brothertoft was built by Thomas Gee of Brothertoft Hall in 1856 and Elizabeth Arlam was the first school mistress.

This school, known as Hedgehog Bridge School, opened in 1881 and closed in December 1969. It is now in use as the Village Hall.

OR, are we mistaken, and is this actually Barley Sheaf School, which opened 1882 and closed 1969?

July 2017

Brothertoft,
Bucknall, Primary School
Bucknall, Primary School
Bucknall, Primary School

The school was opened as a Free School in 1854 and was supported by Christ’s Hospital. It has been a County School since the late 1940s.

In 1999 it was re-named Bucknall Rural Villages School to reflect its wide catchment area, but it has recently reverted to the simpler name of Bucknall Primary School.

July 2017

Bucknall, Primary school
Burton Pedwardine, Old School
Burton Pedwardine, Old School
Burton Pedwardine, Old School

This was built in 1860 as a National School by Henry Edwardes Handley (1835-92) of the Culverthorpe family.

It closed in October 1969 with children transferring to the primary school in Helpringham.

September 2013

Burton Pedwardine, Henry Edwardes Handley, Culverthorpe
Caistor, C of E School
Caistor, C of E School
Caistor, C of E School

The National School (1824) in Church Street was replaced in 1859 by new buildings on South Dale.

The Church of England School of 1859 became part of a joint Methodist/CE Controlled primary school in 1967, when a much larger school building was provided close by. It is now a private dwelling.  

(Does the decorative use of brick on this chimney in the form of the Star of David have any significance?)

The 1859 memorial stone is a tribute to James Green Dixon, a corn, coal and seed merchant in the town and member of the well-to-do landowning Dixon family of Holton le Moor.

Ken Redmore, 2010

Caistor, school, england, methodist,
Caistor, C of E School
Caistor, C of E School
Caistor, C of E School

The 1859 memorial stone is a tribute to James Green Dixon, a corn, coal and seed merchant in the town and member of the well-to-do landowning Dixon family of Holton le Moor.

Ken Redmore, 2010

Caistor, school, dixon, merchant,
Carlton Scroop, Old School
Carlton Scroop, Old School
Carlton Scroop, Old School

A National School, also serving Normanton, built in 1841 at a cost of £500, of which Earl Brownlow contributed £200.

The school building was enlarged in 1896.

August 2012

Carlton Scroop, Earl Brownlow
Cleethorpes, Barcroft Street School
Cleethorpes, Barcroft Street School
Cleethorpes, Barcroft Street School

This was built as a junior school for 360 boys by Croft and Bentley of Grimsby in 1896. Girls and Infants accommodation were added to the north on Elliston Street.

June 2017


Cleethorpes, Barcroft Street, Lovett Street school
Cleethorpes, Bursar Street School
Cleethorpes, Bursar Street School
Cleethorpes, Bursar Street School

This large town school was built 1902 for 360 boys and 360 girls.

June 2017

Cleethorpes, Bursar Street School
Cleethorpes, Elliston Road School
Cleethorpes, Elliston Road School
Cleethorpes, Elliston Road School

This school was opened in 1907 and enlarged in 1910 to give room for 430 boys, 430 girls and 170 infants.

June 2017

Cleethorpes, Elliston Road
Cleethorpes, National Boys' School
Cleethorpes, National Boys' School
Cleethorpes, National Boys' School

The National Boys’ School was built in 1856 to replace an earlier National School of 1815.

It was demolished and St Peter’s Church Hall now stands on the site.

A plaque on its south wall was originally part of the National School.

undated postcard

Cleethorpes, National Boys School, St Peter's Church Hall
Cleethorpes, St Peter Church School
Cleethorpes, St Peter Church School
Cleethorpes, St Peter Church School

The first National School here opened in 1856 for 300 pupils; it was later enlarged for 900.

June 2017

Cleethorpes, St Peter national School
Croft, Old School
Croft, Old School
Croft, Old School

This National School built in 1844 by subscription replaced an earlier building of 1822. It closed in 1963.

July 2016

Croft, National School
Crowland, Old School
Crowland, Old School
Crowland, Old School

National School on St James’s Drove erected 1857 for £1800 for 200. It is built in red brick with Bath Stone dressings.

September 2017

Crowland, primary school
Dunholme, Old School
Dunholme, Old School
Dunholme, Old School

Dunholme National School was built in 1862. It later became a Church of England Controlled Primary School and occupied new buildings elsewhere in the village.

May 2016

Dunholme, primary school
Dunsby, Old School
Dunsby, Old School
Dunsby, Old School

The school and adjoining schoolhouse were built in 1855. The school closed c.1950.

October 2017

Dunsby, old school
East Ravendale, Primary School
East Ravendale, Primary School
East Ravendale, Primary School

This was built in 1867 as a National School also serving the neighbouring villages of Ashby cum Fenby, Brigsley, Hawerby and West Ravendale.

The architect was James Fowler of Louth, his first joint school and church project when he was 29.

June 2014

East Ravendale, primary school, James Fowler
Epworth, Old School
Epworth, Old School
Epworth, Old School

The National School on Battle Green was built 1876 and enlarged in 1912 to hold 300 pupils.

It is now a pub/restaurant ‘The Old School Inn’.

September 2010

Epworth, National School
Folkingham, Old School
Folkingham, Old School
Folkingham, Old School

The National School was built in 1875 for 130 pupils.

A free school was founded in the village in 1713 with endowments at Pidley (Hunts) and Pointon.

September 2013

Folkingham, National School
Friskney, School
Friskney, School
Friskney, School

The building on the left is Friskney School (then one of three in the village – others being on the Friskney Eaudyke and the other in the former East Fen).

It catered for pupils between the ages of 5 and 15 until the late 1950s and then became a primary school.

The stile at the eastern end of the churchyard is on the right of the photograph.

Postcard: date stamp 1941 (George VI)

Friskney, School
Grantham, Grammar School
Grantham, Grammar School
Grantham, Grammar School

The Grammar School is located in Church Street. The old school was built by the 1520s under the terms of the wills of Henry Curteys and his son Richard.

The school was refounded under the will of Bishop Fox in 1528 and was endowed by Edward VI. Famous pupils include Lord Burghley, Sir Isaac Newton, Arthur Storer and playwright Colley Cibber.

Adjacent to the old school is a stone-fronted Georgian townhouse from c1730.  The school is not normally open to the public.

postcard by Whipple of Grantham, 1903

Grantham, grammar school, Isaac Newton, Arthur Storer, Colley Cibber, Bishop Fox, Henry Curteys
Grantham, King's School
Grantham, King's School
Grantham, King's School

A modern view of the same building from the west,

April 2011

Grantham, King's School
Grantham, National CE Junior School
Grantham, National CE Junior School
Grantham, National CE Junior School

This school has always been for boys and girls aged 7 to 11.

The buildings date from 1859 and are by the architect Edward Browning of Stamford (1816-1882).

March 2017

Grantham, National CE Junior School, Edward Browning
Grantham, Spittlegate Primary School
Grantham, Spittlegate Primary School
Grantham, Spittlegate Primary School

A large primary school was built in 1883 opposite St John’s Church and among the housing for the workers at Hornsby’s engineering works.

It was originally Spittlegate St John the Evangelist National School and later became Spittlegate CE Controlled Primary School.

August 2014
Grantham, Spittlegate primary school
Great Hale, Old School
Great Hale, Old School
Great Hale, Old School

A National School built in 1828 by subscription on ground presented by the Marquess of Bristol. In the nineteenth century it had annual endowments of 19gns.

By the turn of the twentieth century it was known as Hale Magna CE School. It closed in summer 1987.

June 2017

Great Hale, primary school
Grimsby, Holme Hill School
Grimsby, Holme Hill School
Grimsby, Holme Hill School

Built in 1876-8 in Gothic style, with a three story clock tower over the main entrance, Holme Hill School is by the architect Charles Bell, who won a nationwide competition for its design.

Frank Robinson, December 2014

Grimsby, Holme Hill School, Charles Bell
Grimsby, Sixhills Street School
Grimsby, Sixhills Street School
Grimsby, Sixhills Street School

Former primary school, now the Grimsby Central Children’s Centre.

June 2017

Grimsby, Sixhills Street School
Grimsby, Strand Street School
Grimsby, Strand Street School
Grimsby, Strand Street School

Built as junior school 1892.

June 2017

Grimsby, Strand Steet School
Grimsby, Welholme Primary School
Grimsby, Welholme Primary School
Grimsby, Welholme Primary School

Infants were first admitted here in 1892

June 2017

Grimsby, Welholme primary school
Hainton, Old School
Hainton, Old School
Hainton, Old School

Built by G F Heneage Esq in 1846 and enlarged in 1886. It was known as Hainton Heneage’s Estate CE School in 1900.

The school was owned by Lord Heneage until 1929, when it was transferred to Lindsey County Council. It closed in July 1970.

PW, August 2010

Hainton, old primary school, heneage
Hainton, Old School
Hainton, Old School
Hainton, Old School
Built by G F Heneage Esq in 1846 and enlarged in 1886. It was known as Hainton Heneage’s Estate CE School in 1900.
The school was owned by Lord Heneage until 1929, when it was transferred to Lindsey County Council. It closed in July 1970.
Hainton, Old primary school, Heneage
Hainton, School
Hainton, School
Hainton, School

Hainton Village School was built in 1846 by George Fieschi Heneage in 1846 to serve the Hainton estate.

It has been redundant for 40 years and is to be converted into two dwellings. The playground is still intact and the stone toilet block and wooden cycle shed  are still there.

The School House is next door and is in use as a dwelling.

Pearl Wheatley, 2013

 

Hainton, Heneage, George Fieschi, school
Hatton, Old School
Hatton, Old School
Hatton, Old School

The primary school in Hatton opened as a National School in 1864 and closed in 1951, with children transferring to schools in Baumber and Wragby.

August 2013

Hatton, primary school
Heighington, Chapel of Ease
Heighington, Chapel of Ease
Heighington, Chapel of Ease

This is Heighington's Chapel of Ease before 1863 when it still served as the Boys’ School for local villages.

The Rector feared that it might be mistaken for a Methodist Chapel, at a time when these brick chapels were appearing widely in Lincolnshire, so he had it faced in stone.

He also fitted the building with pews and enhanced it with an east window of stained glass.

Two school rooms for the boys were built on the north side with a connecting door into the Chapel so that the right to the Charity Fund for the boys to be taught in the Chapel of Ease was retained.

The building existed in 1500 and probably long before and was originally thatched. It is still used as Heighington’s Church.

Heighington, Chapel of Ease, boys' school
Heighington, Chapel of Ease
Heighington, Chapel of Ease
Heighington, Chapel of Ease

The Chapel of Ease at Heighington, with the chimney from the boiler room sticking up at the back.

Initially the Chapel and each school room had open fires, but later central heating radiators were served from a boiler room.

The playground, now the carpark, is north of the right hand side stone wall.

Heighington, Chapel of Ease, schoolroom
Heighington, Garratt's Boys School
Heighington, Garratt's Boys School
Heighington, Garratt's Boys School

Pupils of Garratt's Boys School in the 1920s.

The Master is Mr Simmons.

The chalkboard appears to carry the lettering "Heighington Endowed School 1922".

Heighington, Garratt's Boys School, Simmons
Heighington, Heighington House
Heighington, Heighington House
Heighington, Heighington House

Heighington House in the early twentieth century was run as a Girls' Finishing School where daughters of wealthy farmers 'learnt enough French for a menu, deportment and conversazioné', according to one ex-pupil.

It was originally a farmhouse and bears on a front quoin a sundial with the words 'William Arden fecit'. Arden was a farmer from Bassingham who retired here and built the stone front on the old brick house.

Heighington, finishing school, heighington house, William Arden
Holton le Moor, Old School
Holton le Moor, Old School
Holton le Moor, Old School

A National School was first provided by the Dixon family in 1858. It was replaced by this building, which was designed by H G Gamble, in 1913.

The decorated gable of what was latterly St Luke's CE Aided Primary School carries the patriotic message 'Live for God & King & Country'.

The school closed in 2006.

May 2016

Holton le Moor, primary school, H G Gamble, Dixon
Horncastle, British School
Horncastle, British School
Horncastle, British School

British School on South Street, Horncastle, dates from 1814.

It was later used as a drill hall and is now one of the many antiques centres in the town.

Children of non-conformist families attended the school which used the Lancaster system of teaching.

Pearl Wheatley, 2010

Horncastle, British School, South Street, Lancaster,
Horncastle, Grammar School
Horncastle, Grammar School
Horncastle, Grammar School

Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School, West Street, Horncastle.

In 1908 the school moved to West Street a short while after the first admission of girls.

As shown here, the facade of the original building alongside the main drive and facing West Street remains unchanged.

February 2010

Horncastle, Grammar School
Horncastle, National School
Horncastle, National School
Horncastle, National School

The National School in Manor House Street, Horncastle, was founded in 1814 and is now the Community Centre for the town.

This was a Church of England establishment, close to the parish church and with the head teacher's house attached.

The original building was enlarged and a separate classroom built for boys.

Pearl Wheatley, 2010

Horncastle, National School, Community Centre, Manor House Street,
Horncastle, Old Grammar School
Horncastle, Old Grammar School
Horncastle, Old Grammar School

Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School, Horncastle, is known to have existed in the 14th century when, no doubt, it would be in the church of St. Mary.

At its refounding in 1571 a new school was built south of the church.

In 1778 this was replaced close by with a new building which still survives.

Ken Redmore, 2010

Horncastle, Old Grammar School,
Horncastle, Old Wesleyan School
Horncastle, Old Wesleyan School
Horncastle, Old Wesleyan School

Wesleyan Methodist School, 1859, Foundry Street, Horncastle. It is now a garage.

Methodists supported the British School until they decided to educate their own children.

The premises were formerly a foundry and they were adapted for a general classroom, an infants' room and a playground.

Pearl Wheatley, 2010

Horncastle, Old Wesleyan School, Foundry Street,
Horncastle, Watson's Infants School
Horncastle, Watson's Infants School
Horncastle, Watson's Infants School

Watson's Free Infant School was founded by Richard Watson, son of a wealthy tanner, in 1786.

The school is in West Street (formerly Tanner Street), Horncastle.

It is now the headquarters of the Horncastle Photographic Society.

February 2010

Horncastle, Watons Infant School, West Street, Photographic Society,
Horncastle, Wesleyan Methodist School
Horncastle, Wesleyan Methodist School
Horncastle, Wesleyan Methodist School

Wesleyan Methodist School, Cagthorpe, was built in 1905 after the Foundry Street premises were condemned.

It became the secondary modern school for the town after the second world war until it was replaced in the 1960s by the Banovallum School on Boston Road.

(It now houses the town youth club.)

Pearl Wheatley, 2010

Horncastle, Wesleyan Methodist School, Cagthorpe,
Ingham, Primary School
Ingham, Primary School
Ingham, Primary School

The village primary school on the Green was opened in 1878.

Extensions in the 1980s provided a hall for both school and community use.

drawing by Tom Brooker, 1969

Ingham, primary school
Kirkby la Thorpe
Kirkby la Thorpe
Kirkby la Thorpe

Built as a National School with two classrooms in 1860 it later became a CE controlled primary school.

Extensions were added in 2004 and 2011.

October 2011

Kirkby la Thorpe, primary school
Legsby, old school
Legsby, old school
Legsby, old school

Legsby Old School was built in 1849 at the expense of Sir John Nelthorpe.

Though replaced by a new Council school in 1911 the building continued to be used as an overflow classroom until the late 1960s.

Locals are now trying to convert it into a community centre.

Mark Acton, 2014

Legsby, old school, sir John Nelthorpe
Lincoln, Bishop Grosseteste University College
Lincoln, Bishop Grosseteste University College
Lincoln, Bishop Grosseteste University College

Constance Stewart Hall is the largest residential block at Bishop Grosseteste University College.

It has over 100 bedrooms and is also a good self-contained base for small conferences.

It was built in the 1930s and has several strong Art Deco features.

It is named after a former principal of the college.

Ken Redmore, 2012

 

Lincoln, Bishop Grosseteste, University College, Constance Stewart, Art Deco,
Lincoln, Bishop Grossteste University College
Lincoln, Bishop Grossteste University College
Lincoln, Bishop Grossteste University College

Part of an illuminated banner which depicts the original building of c1862.

The college was established as a teacher training school by the Church of England.

The original chapel, shown here in the foreground, remains in use today.

Ken Redmore 2012

Lincoln Bishop Grosseteste, University College, teacher training,
Lincoln, Lincoln School, WW1 Hospital
Lincoln, Lincoln School, WW1 Hospital
Lincoln, Lincoln School, WW1 Hospital

The 4th Northern General Hospital was set up in Lincoln School on Wragby Road at the beginning of World War I in August 1914.

By early October, the hospital cared for over 200 wounded Belgian soldiers. Many of the wards were in wooden buildings which had been quickly erected on the school playing field.

The school itself was housed in temporary classrooms at the junction of St Anne's Road and Sewell Road.

Undated postcard

Lincoln School, Wragby Road, World War I, Northern General Hospital,
Nettleham, Old School
Nettleham, Old School
Nettleham, Old School

The Old School at Nettleham, founded in 1856 as a National School, is now used for community purposes.

It comprised one hall which could be divided for classrooms, and one smaller classroom (now a kitchen).


Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Nettleham, Old School,
Normanby by Spital, School
Normanby by Spital, School
Normanby by Spital, School
Normanby By Spital, school
Normanby by Spital, School
Normanby by Spital, School
Normanby by Spital, School

The school and school house at Normanby by Spital are in Main Street.

The inscription above a window notes the school was built in 1878 for £1,400, but it was not opened until March 1879.

The ventilator in the roof was to let out the fumes from the stove.

The previous school was on land given by Mrs. Mary Dunn, widow of the rector.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Normanby By Spital, school, Dunn,
Normanby le Wold, Sunday School
Normanby le Wold, Sunday School
Normanby le Wold, Sunday School

This small brick building, with its 'ecclesiastical' pointed arched windows, is close to the west end of St Peter's parish church. It is marked as 'Sunday School' on both First and Second Editions of the Ordnance Survey County Series maps of 1887 and 1905.

It is apparent that it had recently been renovated.

Normanby le Wold,
Riseholme Hall
Riseholme Hall
Riseholme Hall

Riseholme Hall was built by the Chaplin family in 1744.

Purchased by the Church Commissioners in 1840, the Hall was restyled by the architect William Rainton and until the late nineteenth century was the Palace of the Bishop of Lincoln.

After World War 2, the Hall and estate became an agricultural college, now a Campus of the University of Lincoln.

In July 2012, the Further Education provision at Riseholme College transferred to Bishop Burton College.

See: www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/riseholmecollege/ourcampus/history

Riseholme, Hall, Bishop's Palace, William Rainton, agricultural college
Sleaford, Carre's Grammar School
Sleaford, Carre's Grammar School
Sleaford, Carre's Grammar School

Carre's Grammar School was founded by local landowner Sir Robert Carre in 1603.

It first occupied its present site on Northgate in 1835 and new buildings were opened in 1904.

This is now a selective secondary school with special status as a Science and Sports College.

Undated postcard

Sleaford, Carre's grammar school, Sir Robert Carre,
Wainfleet All Saints, School
Wainfleet All Saints, School
Wainfleet All Saints, School

Wainfleet was the birthplace of William Waynflete, who became Bishop of Winchester and Chancellor of England in the 15th century.

Wainfleet School was founded in 1484 by Waynflete as a feeder school for his other foundation, Magdalen College Oxford.

This fine red brick building was in continual use as a school until the 1980s; it now houses the local museum and library.

Frank Robinson, 2007

Wainfleet All Saints, Magdalen School, William Waynflete, brick,