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Settlement - Houses - Vernacular
 
Barlings, Barlings Hall
Barlings, Barlings Hall
Barlings, Barlings Hall

This house dates from the late seventeenth century.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Barlings, Barlings Hall
Baumber, White Cottage
Baumber, White Cottage
Baumber, White Cottage

White Cottage was built in the seventeenth century in mud and stud construction, the common vernacular building method in the east of Lincolnshire

Pearl Wheatley, 2013

Baumber, White Cottage, mud and stud
Boston, Shodfriars Hall
Boston, Shodfriars Hall
Boston, Shodfriars Hall

The half-timbered building shown here is the front part of Shodfriars' Hall (designed by brothers G G Scott junior and J O Scott) in South Street, Boston.

It was built in 1874 and includes timber framing of a smaller earlier building on the site.

Behind this front part is a red brick club-room with storage below.

Postcard, 1913
Boston, hall, scott,
Dalderby, Teapot Hall
Dalderby, Teapot Hall
Dalderby, Teapot Hall

Teapot Hall, Dalderby (TF 252 665) is a much-quoted example of a very simple cruck-framed cottage structure.

However, as M W Barley points out, its sloping walls would have denied headroom and are uncharacteristic of a cruck-framed cottage.

He concludes that it was not a genuine survival of a primitive tradition but was most likely built in the nineteenth century.

Unfortunately it was burned down in 1945 to celebrate VJ Day!

J D Wheeldon

Dalderby, cruck-framed cottage,
Dalderby, Teapot Hall
Dalderby, Teapot Hall
Dalderby, Teapot Hall

A pre-war photograph of this unique building.

Tiles cover the sloping side walls below the low thatched roof.

The front wall appears to be constructed in traditional mud and stud.

Dalderby,
Dalderby, Teapot Hall
Dalderby, Teapot Hall
Dalderby, Teapot Hall

View from the south-east of this well known Lincolnshire curiosity.

Pre-World War newspaper photograph

Dalderby, Tea Pot Hall
Friskney, Church End, Vicarage Cottages
Friskney, Church End, Vicarage Cottages
Friskney, Church End, Vicarage Cottages

These two cottages are at the western end of the church yard. The main southern gate into the church yard is on the right.

The cottage nearest to the viewer is still extant (Vicarage Cottage) and has the date 1797 carved above the door.

The barely-visible thatched cottage behind it has been demolished (see separate image).

Postcard: date stamp 1925

Friskney, Vicarage Cottages
Friskney, Vicarage Gate, cottage
Friskney, Vicarage Gate, cottage
Friskney, Vicarage Gate, cottage

The hand-written commentary on the reverse of this old postcard identifies the two figures as Mrs B Johnson and Mr R Robinson (the school master).

Postcard: c1904 (according to hand-written description on the reverse)

Friskney, Vicarage Cottages
Great Limber, Priest's House
Great Limber, Priest's House
Great Limber, Priest's House

A priory was founded at Limber Magna before 1180 and dissolved in the 15th century.

All that remains of the priory is the old Priestís House with seven-feet thick stone walls.

It has been extended at various times and some of the stone has been faced with brick.

H D Martineau c.1980
Great Limber, priest's house, priory, limber magna,
High Toynton, Thatched Cottage, Gravel Pit Lane
High Toynton, Thatched Cottage, Gravel Pit Lane
High Toynton, Thatched Cottage, Gravel Pit Lane

"Cottage. Late C18.

Colourwashed mud and stud, some colourwashed brick.

Thatched roof, half hipped to west, hipped to east and 2 ridge stacks"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1168167 

DB 9 November 2018

High Toynton, Thatched Cottage, mud and stud
Humberston, thatched cottage
Humberston, thatched cottage
Humberston, thatched cottage

This thatched cottage stood on the south side of North Sea Lane. It was demolished c.1966.

September 1965

Humberston, thatched cottage
Immingham, Worker's Cottage
Immingham, Worker's Cottage
Immingham, Worker's Cottage

In 1907, Price, Wills and Reeve, the contractors building Immingham Docks, built temporary housing for their workers.

This bungalow on Pelham Road with its timber frame clad in corrugated iron sheets, is a surviving example.

It is now a listed building.

Frank Robinson, January 2015

Immingham, cottage, corrugate iron, Price, Wills and Reeve
Langton by Spilsby, Cottage
Langton by Spilsby, Cottage
Langton by Spilsby, Cottage

This quaint circular Cottage Orné in Langton by Spilsby (TF 392704) probably dates from the early 19th century.

(Curiously, Langton by Horncastle also has a 'Cottage Orné', though a less elaborate example that this. Dwellings of this type are quite uncommon in Lincolnshire.)


Frank Robinson, 2009

Langton By Spilsby, cottage orne,
Lincoln, Blyton Cottage
Lincoln, Blyton Cottage
Lincoln, Blyton Cottage

This small cottage in lower High Street was demolished and replaced by a new public house, Golden Cross Inn, in 1958.

Buildings, Blyton Cottage, Golden Cross Inn
Lincoln, Castle Hill
Lincoln, Castle Hill
Lincoln, Castle Hill

The area between Exchequer Gate and the Castle in Lincoln, known as Castle Hill, is cobbled.

The timber-framed building on the corner of Bailgate, formerly a bank and now the local tourist office, has two overhangs and three gables.

On the north side of the hill towards the castle are fine 18th and 19th century houses.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, Castle Hill, Castle, Bailgate,
Lincoln, Whitefriars
Lincoln, Whitefriars
Lincoln, Whitefriars

The fifteenth century timber framed building, known as Whitefriars, in Akrill's passage, alongside 333 High Street, was restored by the Lincoln Co-operative Society in 1961.

William Akrill lived in the house and worked there as a baker in the second quarter of the nineteenth century.

Buildings, Akrill's Passage, Lincoln Co-operative Society, William Akrill
Lincoln, Wilson's Cottages, Newport
Lincoln, Wilson's Cottages, Newport
Lincoln, Wilson's Cottages, Newport

The stone cottages on Newport, Lincoln, known as Wilson's Cottages, were restored by Lincoln Civic Trust in 1993.

They were opened by H R H The Duke of Gloucester.

Pencil drawing by David Vale, 1993

Lincoln, Newport, Wilson's Cottages, Lincoln Civic Trust, Duke of Gloucester,
Navenby, Mrs Smith's Cottage
Navenby, Mrs Smith's Cottage
Navenby, Mrs Smith's Cottage

This early Victorian cottage in the centre of Navenby is named after its last occupant who died in 1995 aged 102. Its furnishings and fittings are entirely those of the nineteenth century.

It is currently being restored (2017).

June 2015

Navenby, Mrs Smith's Cottage
South Kelsey, Cottage
South Kelsey, Cottage
South Kelsey, Cottage

This cottage is situated on the banks of the Caistor Canal in South Kelsey, but no more is known about exact location or its occupiers.

It appears to be of mud-and-stud construction.

South Kelsey, cottage, mud and stud
South Ormsby, Bishop's Cottage
South Ormsby, Bishop's Cottage
South Ormsby, Bishop's Cottage

This fine thatched cottage was owned and used by the Rt Rev Kenneth Riches when he was Bishop of Lincoln in the 1950s.

Photograph 1999

South Ormsby, Bishop's Cottage
Thimbleby, Thatched Cottages
Thimbleby, Thatched Cottages
Thimbleby, Thatched Cottages

These cottages are examples of traditional Lincolnshire 'mud and stud' construction.

They have recent alterations, but were built in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Frank Robinson, 2010

Thimbleby, thatched cottages, mud and stud,
Thimbleby, White Cottage
Thimbleby, White Cottage
Thimbleby, White Cottage

One of several mud and stud cottages in the village's much-photographed main street.

This was a common form of construction found in vernacular buildings in the county, especially in south-east Lindsey.

June 2013

Thimbleby, White Cottage
Thurlby, Cottage, 18 High Street
Thurlby, Cottage, 18 High Street
Thurlby, Cottage, 18 High Street

"Cottage. C17, with C20 alterations.

Timber frame originally, now underbuilt in stone, rendered.

Half hipped thatched roof"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1165556 

DB 17 November 2018

Thurlby, Cottage
Washingborough, Thatched Houses
Washingborough, Thatched Houses
Washingborough, Thatched Houses

These were probably the last thatched houses in Washingborough.

The view looks south with the Hunterís Leap pub immediately on the left, at the top of Oak Hill.

Washingborough, thatched house, Hunter's Leap, Oak Hill