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Barton-Upon-Humber
 
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard

Hacks or drying sheds at Blyth's brick and tile yard, Ings Lane, Barton on Humber (TF 023 233).

This site was one of 40 brick and tile making yards on the south bank of the Humber in the late 19th century (13 were in Barton).

The total output was about 40 million pieces per annum.

Blyth's yard to the west of the Humber Bridge closed in 2006; one other yard remains in production. 

Ken Redmore, 2007

Barton Upon Humber, tiles, blyth's,
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard

Open side of a hack at Blyth's brick and tile yard, Ings Lane, Barton on Humber.

Bricks and pantiles were made on this 30 acre site for about 130 years.

Clay was dug from the rear of the site furthest from the river.

Bricks and tiles were made by hand (later by machine) close by, and the "green" pieces then dried in these open-sided covered racks until ready for firing. 

Ken Redmore, 2007

Barton Upon Humber, tiles, pantiles,
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard

Interior of a hack at Blyth's brick and tile yard, Barton on Humber.

Pantiles were the principal product of the yards on the Humber bank, especially in the twentieth century.

Blyth's yard had three kilns, latterly of the down-draught, intermittent type.

The yard at one time had its own jetty for exporting finished tiles (as far as London) and importing coal from south Yorkshire for firing the kilns. 

Ken Redmore, 2007

Barton Upon Humber, tiles, pantiles,
Barton upon Humber, Hall's Ropery
Barton upon Humber, Hall's Ropery
Barton upon Humber, Hall's Ropery

This impressive brick and pantile Grade 2 listed building is about one-quarter of a mile long.

Its length enabled Hall's company to make very long ropes for marine use. 

Barton Upon Humber, rope,
Barton upon Humber, Hall's Ropery
Barton upon Humber, Hall's Ropery
Barton upon Humber, Hall's Ropery

William Hall, a wealthy Hull shipowner, established his rope making business in Barton in 1767.

The business remained in the hands of the Hall family until the twentieth century.

Among many important products of the ropery were anti-submarine nets made for national defence in World War two.

Barton Upon Humber, rope,
Barton upon Humber, Humber Bridge
Barton upon Humber, Humber Bridge
Barton upon Humber, Humber Bridge

The Humber Bridge was opened to traffic on the 24th of June 1981 after an eight year-long building period.

It measures 1410m between the towers and the overall length between the cable anchorages is 2220m.

The cables comprise 71000 km of 5mm dia wire spun back and forth between the anchorages.

The consulting engineers were Freeman Fox and Partners.

Chris Lester 2012 

Barton Upon Humber, suspension, bridge,
Barton upon Humber, Humber Bridge
Barton upon Humber, Humber Bridge
Barton upon Humber, Humber Bridge

An artist's impression of the bridge from the south bank published shorrtly before work began.

postcard published by Regency Cards of Hull; original painting by Sidney Ferris, 1972

Barton Upon Humber, Humber Bridge, Sidney Ferris
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel in Queen Street was the third to be built in Barton. Joseph Wright of Hull was the architect and it opened in March 1868.

Following closure as a Methodist chapel in 1961, it was used by the Salvation Army. Today it is owned by the Queen Street School Preservation Trust and has been refurbished as a community hall. It is known as the Joseph Wright Hall.

September 2017

Barton Upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Joseph Wright Hall
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The interior layout of this chapel, with steeply pitched gallery, prominent pulpit and centrally positioned organ, is typical of large Methodist chapels of the Victorian period.

The recent refurbishment has inserted a new floor at first floor level and developed the upper, gallery area as a space for concerts and performances.

The building is Grade II listed

undated photograph

Barton Upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Railway Station
Barton upon Humber, Railway Station
Barton upon Humber, Railway Station

The spartan station at Barton seen here in 1981.

Opened in 1846, the station had, on the goods platform seen to the left, a rare open sided goods shed. On the passenger platform was a traditional set of brick buildings.

What is shown here comprises a series of improvements implemented as part of the opening of the Humber Bridge in June 1981 at which time the station became an important part of the public transport link between Grimsby and Hull via the bridge.

Peter Grey Archive, 1981

Barton Upon Humber, railway station,
Barton upon Humber, Railway Station
Barton upon Humber, Railway Station
Barton upon Humber, Railway Station

There was only one platform for passengers at Barton Station, on the south side of the line.

The old station buildings were demolished in the 1980s and the modern minimal structure completed in 1998.

Peesps postcard, published in Barton upon Humber, undated

 

Barton Upon Humber, Railway station
Barton upon Humber, St Mary
Barton upon Humber, St Mary
Barton upon Humber, St Mary

St. Mary's church in Barton-on-Humber was built as a chapel-of-ease.

It has an Early English tower, south arcade and chancel. The north arcade is in late 12th century transitional style.

St Mary's church has many interesting brasses and monuments.

Mark Acton, 2007

See more images of this church

Barton Upon Humber, church, early english, transitional,
Barton upon Humber, St Mary
Barton upon Humber, St Mary
Barton upon Humber, St Mary

View of St Mary's from the east.

postcard published by A Brummitt of Barton, undated

Barton Upon Humber, St Mary church, A Brummitt
Barton upon Humber, St Peter
Barton upon Humber, St Peter
Barton upon Humber, St Peter

The lower stages of the tower of St Peter's Church are Anglo-Saxon dating from about AD 1000 and are Decorated with stone strips in imitation of timber framing.

To the left of the church (west) is the Anglo-Saxon baptistry.

A major archaeological investigation from 1978 to 1984 uncovered both the floor of the church and the churchyard.

There is an exhibition about the findings in the church. This important church is in the care of English Heritage.

Frank Robinson, 2008
Barton Upon Humber, church, anglo-saxon,
Barton upon Humber, St Peter
Barton upon Humber, St Peter
Barton upon Humber, St Peter

The lower stages of the tower of St Peter's Church are Anglo-Saxon dating from about AD 1000 and are Decorated with stone strips in imitation of timber framing.

To the left of the church (west) is the Anglo-Saxon baptistry.

A major archaeological investigation from 1978 to 1984 uncovered both the floor of the church and the churchyard.

There is an exhibition about the findings in the church. This important church is in the care of English Heritage.

Mark Acton, 2007
Barton Upon Humber, church, anglo-saxon,
Barton upon Humber, St Peter
Barton upon Humber, St Peter
Barton upon Humber, St Peter

The lower stages of the tower of St Peter's Church, are Anglo-Saxon dating from about AD 1000 and are Decorated with stone strips, in imitation of timber framing.

To the left of the church (west) is the Anglo-Saxon baptistry.

A major archaeological investigation from 1978 to 1984 uncovered both the floor of the church and the churchyard.

There is an exhibition about the findings in the church. This important church is in the care of English Heritage.

Mark Acton, 2007
Barton Upon Humber, church, anglo-saxon
Barton upon Humber, St Peter
Barton upon Humber, St Peter
Barton upon Humber, St Peter

St Peter's viewed from the south before the clearance of gravestones.

postcard by Jay-em-Jay, 1905

Barton Upon Humber, St Peter church, Jay-em-Jay
Barton upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church
Barton upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church
Barton upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church

The large red-brick Sunday School building to the south of the Trinity Methodist Church was added in 1902.

March 2016

Barton Upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church Sunday School
Barton upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church
Barton upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church
Barton upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church

This chapel was built for the Wesleyan Methodists in 1861 on the site of an early 19th century chapel.

It was originally named the Wesley Chapel.

March 2016


Barton Upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church, Wesley Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Wilderspin School
Barton upon Humber, Wilderspin School
Barton upon Humber, Wilderspin School

The infants’ school on Queen Street was a model school built in 1844 for Samuel Wilderspin, the internationally known pioneer of infant education.

It is now a museum.

Frank Robinson, October 2010

Barton Upon Humber, Wilderspin School, Queen Street, infant education
Barton upon Humber, Wilderspin School
Barton upon Humber, Wilderspin School
Barton upon Humber, Wilderspin School

View of the rear of the former infants' school, showing some of the renovation that has recently taken place.

Wilderspin was one of the first to recognise the value of play in the education of young children and this has been reflected in the layout of the playground at this school.

March 2011

Barton Upon Humber, Wilderspin School
Barton upon Humber, Wilderspin School
Barton upon Humber, Wilderspin School
Barton upon Humber, Wilderspin School

The 5-seater earth closet at the Wilderspin School may not have been the original fitting.

March 2011

Barton Upon Humber, Wilderspin School, earth closet
Russell, Rex - blue plaque
Russell, Rex - blue plaque
Russell, Rex - blue plaque

Rex Russell (1916-2014) was a local historian whose interests focused on issues such as enclosure, labourers’ movements, Methodism, friendly societies, education, teetotalism and 19th century cultural changes.

He was an accomplished artist and draughtsman and an inspiring teacher. He lived in Barton upon Humber and worked for most of his adult life in north Lincolnshire.

March 2016

Barton Upon Humber, Rex Russell, blue plaque
Russell, Rex - house in Barton
Russell, Rex - house in Barton
Russell, Rex - house in Barton

The blue plaque is fixed to this house, 11 Priestgate, Barton-upon-Humber, where Rex Russell lived and worked as an adult education tutor and author for more than 60 years.

March 2016

Barton Upon Humber, Rex Russell, 11 Priestgate