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Boston
 
Boston, Bargate Green
Boston, Bargate Green
Boston, Bargate Green

This slender triangle of land lying to the north-east of the town centre was adjacent to the cattle market. The stocks were at one end of the Green (behind the viewpoint).

Immediately beyond the Green can be seen a pair of cannon.

postcard, 1902

Boston, Bargate Green, cannon, stocks
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church

Centenary Methodist Church in Red Lion Street, Boston, was built by the Wesleyan Methodists in 1839-40 and had an attractive facade with twin towers and a colonnade between them.

The church shown here burnt down on 29 June 1909 but was rebuilt and re-opened in 1911. It is still in use.

Postcard, c1908
Boston, wesleyan, methodist,
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Picture from The Boston Album of Views, undated (probably c.1900)
Boston, Wesleyan methodist chapel
Boston, Coat of Arms
Boston, Coat of Arms
Boston, Coat of Arms

Boston Corporation was formed in 1545 and lasted until 31 March 1974.

These arms were granted to the Corporation on 1 December 1568.

The three crowns are thought to refer to the town's medieval links with Cologne, and the woolsack reflects the town's early prosperity based on the wool trade.

Postcard, c1908

Boston, arms, woolsack,
Boston, Congregational Church
Boston, Congregational Church
Boston, Congregational Church

The Congregational Church stood in Red Lion Street.

From The Boston Album of Views, c.1900

Boston, Congregational Church
Boston, Cottage Hospital
Boston, Cottage Hospital
Boston, Cottage Hospital

Boston Cottage Hospital was built in 1874 for those suffering from accidents or curable diseases.

The 33-acre ‘Peoples Park’ was given to the people of Boston by the Corporation in 1871. W. H. Wheeler laid out pleasure gardens planted with trees and shrubs.

Football, cricket and other sports were played there.

Postcard posted in 1909

Boston, cottage hospital, People's Park, W H Wheeler
Boston, Cottage Hospital
Boston, Cottage Hospital
Boston, Cottage Hospital
Photograph from the 'Boston Album of Views', c.1900
Boston, hospital recreation ground
Boston, Cowbridge
Boston, Cowbridge
Boston, Cowbridge

One of three matching footbridges cast at Butterley (Derbyshire) in 1811 and erected over the Maud Foster Drain (TF 329471).

It was designed by John Rennie or William Jessop.

March 2013

Boston, Cowbridge, John Rennie, William Jessop
Boston, Dock
Boston, Dock
Boston, Dock

Boston Dock was built south of the town centre by Boston Coroporation as the Harbour Trust.

The first vessel entered the Dock on 15 December 1884 and ended a thirty-year period of economic stagnation for the port.

Undated postcard
Boston, dock,
Boston, Dock
Boston, Dock
Boston, Dock

Boston Dock has a seven-acre basin and was built in fields to the south of the town centre.

Its traffic included the import of Baltic timber and export of coal from Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire.

A coal hoist can be seen to the right in this picture.

Undated postcard
Boston, dock,
Boston, Dock
Boston, Dock
Boston, Dock

Boston Dock had railway sidings and two large granaries to hold grain for export.

One of the granaries is to the left in this picture but both were demolished in the second half of the twentieth century.

Postcard, c1908
Boston, dock, granaries, sidings,
Boston, Dock
Boston, Dock
Boston, Dock

For a number of years Lincolnshire potatoes (in 56lb bags) were exported through Boston.

Today the fishing fleet moors below the railway bridge.

Trading vessels lie either in tidal berths beside the dock where there are facilities for handling scrap steel or in the dock itself where there are facilities for handling paper, steel coil and grain as well as timber and general cargo, including containers.

Image 1975

Boston, dock, potatoes
Boston, Dock entrance
Boston, Dock entrance
Boston, Dock entrance
Photograph from the 'Boston Album of Views' c.1900
Boston, dock entrance
Boston, Doughty Warehouse
Boston, Doughty Warehouse
Boston, Doughty Warehouse

This tall and slender warehouse dates from c.1810 and stands on Doughty Quay, once the main quay on the west bank of the Haven.

It has a low-pitched roof and prominent, over-hanging gables.

It is known locally as the Van Smirren Building, after the twentieth century shellfish company that traded there.

March 2013

Boston, Doughty Quay warehouse
Boston, Doughty&nbspWarehouse
Boston, Doughty Warehouse
Boston, Doughty Warehouse

This tall and slender warehouse dates from c.1810 and stands on Doughty Quay, once the main quay on the west bank of the Haven.

It has a low-pitched roof and prominent, over-hanging gables.

It is known locally as the Van Smirren Building, after the twentieth century shellfish company that traded there.

March 2013

Boston, Doughty warehouse, van Smirren building
Boston, Doughty&nbspWarehouse
Boston, Doughty Warehouse
Boston, Doughty Warehouse

The warehouse was originally in public ownership and lettering which described its functions has survived.

March 2013

Boston, Doughty warehouse
Boston, Feather Factory
Boston, Feather Factory
Boston, Feather Factory

The Feather factory in Trinity Street was built in 1877 by F S Anderson and Co.

At the time it was one of several factories in the area processing goose feathers for bedware and the like.

The building has been converted into domestic flats.

Neil Wright, 2004
Boston, feathers,
Boston, Fydell House
Boston, Fydell House
Boston, Fydell House

Fydell House was bought by Richard Fydell in 1733, and was owned by members of the family in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Seen here is a rear view across the formal gardens. The armillary sphere in the foreground is part of a tribute to Joseph Banks – a frequent visitor to the house.

Frank Robinson, September 2014

Boston, Fydell House, Joseph Banks, Robert Fydell
Boston, Fydell House
Boston, Fydell House
Boston, Fydell House

Fydell House is thought to have been built in 1702-03 to a design by architect William Sands, who was responsible for the garden of Ayscoughfee Hall in Spalding.

The Jackson family were the original owners of the house and it was probably built for Mrs Lennox Jackson, who was then an elderly widow living with her family.

In 1733, Richard Fydell (1710-80), a worker in the wine trade, bought the house from Richard Browne. Richard went on to build a very successful business, which his son Thomas (1740-1812) continued.

Richard and Thomas between them were mayors of Boston six times. They also represented Boston in five parliaments. Thomas’s own son, Thomas Junior (1773 – 1814) also represented Boston at parliament.

1975 image

Boston, Fydell House, William Sands, Lennox Jackson, Richard Browne
Boston, Gas Lamps
Boston, Gas Lamps
Boston, Gas Lamps

Boston’s gasworks was designed by John Rofe and opened in 1826. The works were extended by JTB Porter of Lincoln in 1871.

By 1892 there were 350 gas lamps in the town.

This set of original lamp standards and fittings has been retained in the town’s Market Place.

March 2013

Boston, gas lamps, Market Place, J T B Porter, John Rofe
Boston, General Hospital
Boston, General Hospital
Boston, General Hospital

The former Boston General Hospital was situated on South End and established in 1871 in temporary premises as the Boston Cottage Hospital.

A new building was erected in 1874 and subsequently extended on several occasions.

The name was changed to Boston Hospital, c1887, and Boston General Hospital, c1937.

The Hospital was replaced by the new Boston Pilgrim Hospital, opened in 1971.

Photo dated 1958

Boston, General Hospital, Pilgrim Hospital
Boston, Grand Sluice
Boston, Grand Sluice
Boston, Grand Sluice

The Witham Navigation was created in the 1760s and ended at the Grand Sluice, with the tidal haven beyond the sluice.

The Great Northern Railway crossed the river at this point and by the date of this picture the river was used for recreation rather than commerce, as these rowing boats show.

Postcard, c1912
Boston, sluice, navigation, witham,
Boston, Grand Sluice
Boston, Grand Sluice
Boston, Grand Sluice

Boston Grand Sluice was built in 1764-66 and enlarged in 1881. The railway bridge seen here was built be the GNR in 1885 and now carries the line to Skegness (former East Lincolnshire Line).

This stretch of the lower Witham north of Boston was used for recreational boating.

undated postcard by Boots Cash Chemists

Boston, grand sluice, railway bridge
Boston, Guildhall
Boston, Guildhall
Boston, Guildhall

The Guildhall was established in 1260 as the hall of the Guild of the Blessed St Mary.

After the abolition of trade guilds the building was used as a civic centre for more than three centuries.

It is now a museum.

undated postcard

Boston, Guildhall, Mary, museum
Boston, Guildhall
Boston, Guildhall
Boston, Guildhall

A view of the Banqueting Hall showing the crown-post roof.

The Guildhall, though much altered over the years, has original brickwork and timbers dated to the late fourteenth century.

Frank Robinson, September 2014

Boston, Guildhall banqueting hall
Boston, Herbert Ingram Statue
Boston, Herbert Ingram Statue
Boston, Herbert Ingram Statue

Herbert Ingram (1811-60), born in Boston, founded The Illustrated London News.

He represented Boston as a Liberal MP for four years until his early death in a shipping accident in Canada.

His statue, designed by Alexander Munro in 1862, stands in the Market Place in Boston.

March 2013

Boston, Herbert Ingram statue, Alexander Munro
Boston, High Street, No.116
Boston, High Street, No.116
Boston, High Street, No.116

This 5-bay late Georgian house was built for William Garfit (1700-81), founder of Lincolnshire’s first private bank – in this house – in 1754.

It remained in use as Garfit’s Bank until 1890 when the business moved to the Market Place.

The house passed through several owners in the 20th century but was derelict from the mid-1980s.

March 2013 

Boston, 116 High Street, William Garfit, bank
Boston, High Street, No.116
Boston, High Street, No.116
Boston, High Street, No.116

In 2008 this fine house was acquired by Heritage Trust of Lincolnshire and, with the support of substantial grants from the Heritage Lottery Fund and the European Regional Development Fund, it was refurbished.

At the rear (as seen here) a sympathetic extension was built to provide access for the disabled.

March 2013

Boston, 116 High Street
Boston, High Street, No.116, interior
Boston, High Street, No.116, interior
Boston, High Street, No.116, interior

Many of the original interior features of 116 High Street have been retained and sympathetically restored.

This fine stained glass is on the stairs overlooking the rear garden.

March 2013

Boston, 116 High Street
Boston, High Street, No.120
Boston, High Street, No.120
Boston, High Street, No.120

This house, dating from the late eighteenth century, is considered by Pevsner to be the best house in the street.

It has five bays, with a pediment over the centre bays which contains a Rococo cartouche and long garland of flowers.

March 2013

Boston, 120 High Street
Boston, High Street, No.128
Boston, High Street, No.128
Boston, High Street, No.128

Numbers 124-136 form an unusual eighteenth century terrace of three storeys and eighteen bays divided by giant pilasters.

This photograph shows one of the original doorways.

March 2013

Boston, 128 High Street
Boston, High Street, No.35
Boston, High Street, No.35
Boston, High Street, No.35

Structural timbers in the gable end of 35 High Street indicate its medieval origins.

It is one of several timber-framed houses of this period along this stretch of High Street.

March 2013

Boston, 35 High Street, timber framed building
Boston, Hospital Bridge
Boston, Hospital Bridge
Boston, Hospital Bridge

When the Maud Foster Drain was widened by John Rennie in 1811 three matching cast-iron footbridges were cast at Butterley (Derbyshire) and erected in Boston.

They are thought to have been designed either by Rennie himself or William Jessop, another eminent drainage engineer.

The Hospital Bridge shown here, close to the Maud Foster windmill, is one of the two bridges that remain (the other is at Cowbridge).

Ken Redmore, 2008

 

Boston, bridge, rennie, butterley, maude foster drain,
Boston, Hussey Tower
Boston, Hussey Tower
Boston, Hussey Tower

The Hussey Tower, close to the centre of Boston (TF 331436), is one of the earliest brick buildings in Lincolnshire (c1460).

It was built by Richard Benyngton JP as part of a larger domestic complex.

Among the surviving architectural features of interest are a brick vaulted ceiling and an octagonal stair turret.

It is in the care of the Heritage Trust for Lincolnshire on behalf of the owners, Boston Borough Council.

Postcard, c1910
Boston, tower, benyngton,
Boston, Independent Chapel
Boston, Independent Chapel
Boston, Independent Chapel

Boston's Independent chapel stood on Grove Street.

From The Boston Album of Views, c.1900

Boston, Independent chapel
Boston, Maud Foster Drain, Cowbridge
Boston, Maud Foster Drain, Cowbridge
Boston, Maud Foster Drain, Cowbridge
An angling competition is depicted alongside the Maud Foster Drain which is about two miles north of Boston town centre in the Edwardian period.

The road on the right-hand bank is the present B1183 to Horncastle; the public house on the extreme right is thought to be the Cowbridge House Inn.

Hundreds of anglers travelled by train from Sheffield and the Midlands for sport in both the Witham and the fenland drains at this time.

Undated postcard
Boston, angling, witham, drain,
Boston, New Town Bridge
Boston, New Town Bridge
Boston, New Town Bridge

This view shows the road crossing Boston's new Town Bridge erected in 1913 to the design of John J Webster.

The old bridge on this site was demolished in 1913 and the new one opened on 18 July.

The building in the background is the Assembly Rooms built in 1819-22.

Postcard, 1914

Boston, bridge, assembly rooms,
Boston, Old Bath Gardens
Boston, Old Bath Gardens
Boston, Old Bath Gardens
Photograph from 'The Boston Album of Views', c.1900
Boston, Old Bath gardens
Boston, Old Town Bridge
Boston, Old Town Bridge
Boston, Old Town Bridge

This view is looking from High Street in Boston across the Town Bridge into the Market Place.

The bridge shown here was designed by John Rennie, built in 1803-07 and demolished in April 1913.

Controversially, Boston Corporation tried to charge tolls on the bridge until they lost a court case in 1830.

Postcard, 1911
Boston, bridge, rennie,
Boston, Packhouse Quay
Boston, Packhouse Quay
Boston, Packhouse Quay

This boat is moored at Packhouse Quay which had been the heart of the port of Boston until the Dock, south of the town, was opened in the 1880s.

Some of the warehouses remain in the town centre but they have been converted to other uses.

Postcard, c1918
Boston, warehouse, quay,
Boston, Paddle Steamers
Boston, Paddle Steamers
Boston, Paddle Steamers

Even after Boston Dock was opened south of the town, paddle steamers Privateer and Boston were still moored at the old quays in the town centre and occasionally took pleasure trips into the Wash.

This paddle steamer passes the timber yard in the South End on its way downstream.

Postcard, c1908
Boston, paddle steamer,
Boston, Post Office
Boston, Post Office
Boston, Post Office

The main Post Office in Wide Bargate, Boston, was opened on 12 December 1907 by the Postmaster General.

The public counter now fills most of the ground floor but the original sorting office and telephone have been moved elsewhere.

Undated postcard
Boston, post office,
Boston, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Boston, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Boston, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel was in West Street.

Photograph from 'The Boston Album of Views', c.1900

Boston, Primitive methodist chapel
Boston, Railway Bridge
Boston, Railway Bridge
Boston, Railway Bridge

This shows the railway bridge carrying the Great Northern Railway across the river Witham on the upstream side of the Grand Sluice at Boston.

The iron bridge designed by Richard Johnson, GNR's chief engineer, was opened on 28 May 1885 to replace the original wooden bridge of 1848.

Postcard, 1909

 

Boston, bridge, gnr, grand sluice,
Boston, Railway Station
Boston, Railway Station
Boston, Railway Station

Opened in 1848, Boston was an important station at the junction of the line from Grimsby to Peterborough with the line from Boston to Grantham and Nottingham.

Seen here in 1970, it was about to lose the through services with the closure of the former route.

Today it is served by trains running between Nottingham and Skegness.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Boston, railway station
Boston, River Witham
Boston, River Witham
Boston, River Witham

The River Witham north of Boston was diverted from a winding channel into this new straight cutting in the 1760s.

Behind the barge in this view is the railway bridge and beyond it, the Grand Sluice which separated the inland river from the tidal haven.

Postcard, 1911

Boston, witham, grand sluice,
Boston, River Witham
Boston, River Witham
Boston, River Witham

Three warehouses, dating from the late 18th and early 19th centuries, front the river Witham close to the centre of Boston.

On the extreme right is Packhouse Quay, a building converted by the County Council into the Sam Newsum Music Centre in 1978

Boston, River Witham
Boston, Riverside
Boston, Riverside
Boston, Riverside

View of the Witham in Boston, 1904.

Packhorse Quay is on the left (west bank) and beyond are the backs of premises in High Street.

Boston, Riverside
Boston, Sessions House
Boston, Sessions House
Boston, Sessions House

The Sessions House was built between 1841 and 1842 to designs by Charles Kirk who was also responsible for the near identical Sessions House in Spalding (completed in 1843).

The new building accommodated the sittings of the Quarter Sessions and the Kirton and Skirbeck Bench.

It has been subject to very few alterations, most of which have been carried out in the custody and service areas located to the rear of the ground floor.

The Sessions House ceased to be used as a Magistrates Court in 2003.

undated print

Boston, Sessions House, Charles Kirk
Boston, Shodfriars Hall
Boston, Shodfriars Hall
Boston, Shodfriars Hall

The half-timbered building shown here is the front part of Shodfriars' Hall (designed by brothers G G Scott junior and J O Scott) in South Street, Boston.

It was built in 1874 and includes timber framing of a smaller earlier building on the site.

Behind this front part is a red brick club-room with storage below.

Postcard, 1913
Boston, hall, scott,
Boston, Shodfriars Hall
Boston, Shodfriars Hall
Boston, Shodfriars Hall
Photograph from 'The Boston Album of Views', c.1900
Boston, Shodfriars Hall
Boston, Skirbeck, St Nicholas
Boston, Skirbeck, St Nicholas
Boston, Skirbeck, St Nicholas

St Nicholas Church in Skirbeck, on the edge of Boston, was damaged by a great flood in 1571 and parts were demolished in 1595.

This picture shows the church after George Gilbert Scott had restored the nave and roof in 1869-75 but before the aisles were extended in 1905. A new chancel was built in 1933-35.

Postcard, 1908
Boston, church, scott,
Boston, South Square
Boston, South Square
Boston, South Square

Close by the Witham, two of Boston's most notable buildings look over South Square.

At the rear centre is the Guildhall, a fifteenth century brick building, recently restored.

Next to it is Fydell House with classical features, built in 1726 for William Fydell.

On the near left is a Late Georgian warehouse, one of several on this stretch of the river.

Undated photograph
Boston, square, guildhall, fydell,
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph

St Botolph's church, on the north-west side of the Market Place in Boston, is one of the largest parish churches in the country.

The exceptional Perpendicular tower (or, as locally known, "the stump") is 272 ft high and a great Lincolnshire landmark.

Postcard dated 1911
Boston, church, stump, perpendicular,
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph

The tower ("stump") of St Botolph's in Boston was extensively repaired and restored in 1932.

Postcard

Boston, St Botolph, restoration
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph

The classic view of Boston "Stump" from the Town Bridge over the Witham.

March 2013

Boston, St Botolph church,
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph

The chancel of St Botolph's church.  The choir stalls with misercords date from the late 14th century.

The canopies over the stalls were constructed in the 1850s.

March 2013

Boston, St Botolph church, chancel
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph

The pulpit and tester in St Botolph's church, Boston.  It is dated 1612 and has a Georgian stair.

March 2013

Boston, St Botolph church, pulpit
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph

View of the interior of St Botolph's looking east.

In the foreground is the Victorian font designed by Pugin in 1853.

There are seven-bay arcades between the nave and both aisles.

undated postcard

Boston, St Botolph church, Pugin
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph
An undated postcard with view of St Botolph's from the North-west.
Boston, St Botolph
Boston, St Botolph, Memorial
Boston, St Botolph, Memorial
Boston, St Botolph, Memorial

The Australia Memorial in St Botolph’s church commemorates the Lincolnshire explorers such as George Bass, Joseph Banks and John Franklin who helped to shape modern Australia.

Funds are currently being sought for its restoration (2013).

Mark Acton, 2013

Boston, St Botolph, Australia, Banks, Bass, Franklin
Boston, St Botolph, Memorial
Boston, St Botolph, Memorial
Boston, St Botolph, Memorial

The memorial in St Botolph’s church to Thomas Fydell (1740-1812) and his wife Elizabeth.

Fydell was three times Mayor of Boston, MP for the town from 1790-1803 and 1806-1812 and commandant of the Boston Volunteers. He was a wine merchant and banker.

Mark Acton, 2013

Boston, St Botolph church, Thomas Fydell, Elizabeth, Boston Volunteers
Boston, St Botolph, Royal Arms
Boston, St Botolph, Royal Arms
Boston, St Botolph, Royal Arms

This Royal Arms in St Botolph’s church is a rare survivor with the Stuart Arms of Charles I.

Mark Acton, 2013

Boston, St Botolph church, royal arms, Charles I
Boston, Tower Street
Boston, Tower Street
Boston, Tower Street
Photograph from 'The Boston Album of Views', c.1900
Boston, Tower Street
Boston, Warehouses
Boston, Warehouses
Boston, Warehouses

Three warehouses, dating from the late 18th and early 19th centuries, front the river Witham close to the centre of Boston.

On the extreme right is Packhouse Quay, a building converted by the County Council into the Sam Newsum Music Centre in 1978.

Ken Redmore, 2008
Boston, warehouse,
Boston, Wide Bargate
Boston, Wide Bargate
Boston, Wide Bargate

Wide Bargate was the heart of Boston's livestock fairs and markets until the second half of the twentieth century.

This picture from the Edwardian period shows pens full of sheep in the area close to the junction with Pen Street.

Postcard, 1915
Boston, livestock, sheep, fair,
Boston, Woodlands Court
Boston, Woodlands Court
Boston, Woodlands Court

A home for the "aged sick".

photo dated 1958

Boston, Woodland Court, aged sick