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Branston
 
Branston Hall Gasworks
Branston Hall Gasworks
Branston Hall Gasworks

This photograph, taken about 1980, shows the then surviving buildings of the gasworks which George Bower of St Neots advertised as having built in the 1850s for the Melville family at Branston Hall.

It was later extended, possibly by Porter & Co of Lincoln, and ceased working in the 1920s.

The small building with the ventilators is the retort house; the condenser and purifier stood outside and coal was stored in the building on the left.

Today only the former threshing barn at the rear survives (as a house) together with the pit of one gasholder. 

See: Ken Redmore, Branston Hall Gasworks, Lincolnshire History and Archaeology, 45 (2010), pp 31-33.

Branston, gas, hall, Bower, Porter,
Branston Booths, Methodist Chapel
Branston Booths, Methodist Chapel
Branston Booths, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Chapel and Sunday school in Moor Lane, Branston Booths were built in 1911 to replace an earlier chapel built in 1847. They were converted into a house in 2005.

Pearl Wheatley, 2102

Branston, Booths, Methodist Chapel Wesleyan
Branston, All Saints
Branston, All Saints
Branston, All Saints

The tower of All Saints is probably Anglo-Saxon and the porch Norman.

There in fact elements of the building from every period, and Victorian restoration by GG Scott.

June 2013

Branston, All Saints church
Branston, All Saints
Branston, All Saints
Branston, All Saints

From the north-east showing to the left the chancel east window of 1964-66 and in the centre foreground the Sunday School of 1837.

June 2013

Branston, All Saints church
Branston, All Saints
Branston, All Saints
Branston, All Saints

The little used west door at Branston is Norman with blank arcading of the same period on either side.

June 2013

Branston, All Saints church
Branston, Bus
Branston, Bus
Branston, Bus

One of the first buses (Silver Queen) to serve Branston, seen here at Branston cross roads pointing along Station Road towards Heighington.

It appears to have come from Sleaford and to be heading for Lincoln. The destination board on the front reads: LINCOLN via Washingborough, Heighington, Branston, Metheringham, Blankney, Scopwick, Digby, Dorrington and Ruskington.

The tall building behind it is the Post Office.

Branston, bus, Heighington, Post Office
Branston, Finger Post
Branston, Finger Post
Branston, Finger Post

A very fine 1930s cast iron finger post, now fully restored, is shown here.

The roundel on top gives the location (Branston Mere) and the local authority (K.C.C. = Kesteven County Council).

The post is 0.5 mile east of Waddington Airfield on the B1178.

Chris Lester, 2001
Branston, sign, finger, post,
Branston, High Street
Branston, High Street
Branston, High Street

This photograph taken in c.1930 looks south from Lincoln Road along High Street towards the centre of the village with the All Saints church and the Waggon and Horses public house in the distance.

On the right is the parish Reading Room.

Courtesy, Mrs Bellamy
Branston, road, reading room,
Branston, Mere, Y Station Guardhouse
Branston, Mere, Y Station Guardhouse
Branston, Mere, Y Station Guardhouse

The guardhouse at the entrance to the Mere Y Station site was built in the 1950s at the time of the Cold War.

The site ceased to operate in about 1954.

October 2009

Branston, Mere, Y Station guardhouse, Cold War
Branston, Mere, Y Station mast supports
Branston, Mere, Y Station mast supports
Branston, Mere, Y Station mast supports

One of the very first stations for listening to wireless traffic was set up in 1927 at the hamlet of Mere, about two miles south of Branston village centre.

The station continued in operation playing an important and secretive role until the 1950s.

The base of one of the 4 or 5 receiver masts from the 1930s can be seen in the in a small area of woodland alongside the site.

October 2009

Branston, Mere Y Station, mast supports
Branston, Mere, Y Station Operations Room
Branston, Mere, Y Station Operations Room
Branston, Mere, Y Station Operations Room

The operations room or signal receiver building was built in the 1950s and is now used as an agricultural building.

It replaced WW2 wooden huts where Morse signals were received, often giving early warnings of Luftwaffe activity.

Transmissions were taken daily by RAF despatch rider to Cheadle and later to Bletchley for decoding.

October 2009

Branston, Y Station, Mere, Operations Room, Bletchley, Cheadle
Branston, Old Infants School
Branston, Old Infants School
Branston, Old Infants School

The building occupying Nos 9 and 11 Hall Lane was originally an Infants School built by Hon A S Leslie Melville of Branston Hall.

It opened in 1837 for 70 children and, like other schools of the period, was supported by voluntary contributions.

June 2013

Branston, infants school, A S Leslie Melville
Branston, Roman candlestick
Branston, Roman candlestick
Branston, Roman candlestick

This wonderful copper alloy candlestick, discovered at Branston in 1973, is one of the finest examples ever found in Britain.

When discovered, the candlestick was missing one leg, and the other two were bent underneath.

When the soil was cleaned out of the drip pan, two bronze coins of Constantine II (dated AD335-340) were found inside.

The bent legs were straightened and a replacement third leg added at the time of discovery, but it remains likely that the damage was deliberately done at the time the candlestick was buried and is an important aspect of the object's deposition.

The design of the candlestick is unique, and believed to have been manufactured in Britain, rather than on the continent, in the 3rd or early 4th Centuries AD.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Branston, Roman candlestick, copper alloy, Constantine
Branston, Roman tombstone
Branston, Roman tombstone
Branston, Roman tombstone

This limestone memorial inscription was discovered at Branston in 1963.  Although broken, it is possible to translate the major part of the inscription.

The inscription reads:

IN HIS PRAED[IS] (OSSA SITA SUNT)
AVREL(IAE) CO[NCE]
SSAE SAN[CTIS]
SIMAE PV[ELLAE]

This has been restored and translated as 'In this estate (lie buried the bones) of Aurelia Concessa, a very pure girl'.

The stone does not seem to be an actual tombstone, therefore, but a memorial to her, presumably erected by her family on land that they owned and that Aurelia knew well.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Branston, tombstone Aurelia Concessa,
Branston, Sunday School
Branston, Sunday School
Branston, Sunday School

The rector of Branston, Revd Peregrine Curtois, funded this extension on the north-east side All Saints' Church in 1837 to provide a Sunday School for the village.

June 2013

 

Branston, Peregrine Curtois, Sunday School
Branston, Sunday School
Branston, Sunday School
Branston, Sunday School

Plaque commemorating the Sunday School annexe of 1837.

June 2013

Branston,
Branston, Waterworks
Branston, Waterworks
Branston, Waterworks

In 1879 a waterwheel-powered waterworks was installed by Charles Hett of Brigg for the Melville family of Branston.

Water from a sluice in Branston Beck was used to turn this waterwheel which, in turn, drove pumps to raise water from a spring.

It was pumped to Branston Old Hall (and, later, to the New Hall when it was completed in 1886).

Ken Redmore, 2009
Branston, waterworks, hett, waterwheel, melville,
Branston, Waterworks
Branston, Waterworks
Branston, Waterworks

In 1879 a waterwheel-powered waterworks was installed by Charles Hett of Brigg for the Melville family of Branston.

Water from a sluice in Branston Beck was used to turn this waterwheel which, in turn, drove pumps to raise water from a spring.

It was pumped to Branston Old Hall (and, later, to the New Hall when it was completed in 1886).

The pumps in the foreground were installed later together with a gas engine to supplement the original equipment.

Ken Redmore, 2009

 

Branston, waterworks, hett, waterwheel, melville,
Branston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Branston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Branston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Chapel Lane, Branston was built in 1883 at a cost of £1100 next to the previous chapel which became the Sunday school. The lancet windows on the ground floor are as original.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Branston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel