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Settlement - Health
 
Boston, Cottage Hospital
Boston, Cottage Hospital
Boston, Cottage Hospital

Boston Cottage Hospital was built in 1874 for those suffering from accidents or curable diseases.

The 33-acre ‘Peoples Park’ was given to the people of Boston by the Corporation in 1871. W. H. Wheeler laid out pleasure gardens planted with trees and shrubs.

Football, cricket and other sports were played there.

Postcard posted in 1909

Boston, cottage hospital, People's Park, W H Wheeler
Boston, Cottage Hospital
Boston, Cottage Hospital
Boston, Cottage Hospital
Photograph from the 'Boston Album of Views', c.1900
Boston, hospital recreation ground
Boston, General Hospital
Boston, General Hospital
Boston, General Hospital

The former Boston General Hospital was situated on South End and established in 1871 in temporary premises as the Boston Cottage Hospital.

A new building was erected in 1874 and subsequently extended on several occasions.

The name was changed to Boston Hospital, c1887, and Boston General Hospital, c1937.

The Hospital was replaced by the new Boston Pilgrim Hospital, opened in 1971.

Photo dated 1958

Boston, General Hospital, Pilgrim Hospital
Boston, Woodlands Court
Boston, Woodlands Court
Boston, Woodlands Court

A home for the "aged sick".

photo dated 1958

Boston, Woodland Court, aged sick
Bracebridge Heath, Asylum
Bracebridge Heath, Asylum
Bracebridge Heath, Asylum

The hospital at Bracebridge Heath opened as the County Pauper Lunatic Asylum in 1852.

Designed in Italienate style, the huge complex of buildings could accommodate 250 patients, and was set in extensive grounds, which included gardens, a cemetery and a 30 acre farm worked by the inmates.

St John’s Hospital, as it was finally known, remained in use until 1989.  Seen here is the central block, which after standing empty for many years may yet be converted to apartments.

Postcard, 1904

Bracebridge Heath, lunatic asylum, St John Hospital
Grantham, Hospital
Grantham, Hospital
Grantham, Hospital

The hospital on Manthorpe Road was opened by Countess Brownlow on 5 January 1876. It had cost over £5,000 and Lady Brownlow had laid the foundation stone on 29 October 1874 no doubt because the land on which it stood had been donated by her husband.

The central block of two storeys included an operating room, kitchen and offices and four bedrooms on the first floor. Wings on either side formed the wards for male and female patients.

A five-bed fever ward and the laundry stood separately to the rear. The building shown in the post-card has stood unused for several years.

postcard by Whipple of Grantham, 1903

Grantham, hospital, Lady Brownlow, Manthorpe Road
Grimsby, Hospital
Grimsby, Hospital
Grimsby, Hospital

The hospital shown opened in 1877 on a site in the West Marsh area of Grimsby.

A new ward was built in 1885, the first of many such additions.  By 1910, an X-ray department had been established.

The hospital continued to adapt, serving the people of Grimsby, Cleethorpes and surrounding area until 1983, when the new Diana Princess of Wales hospital opened in the south of the town.

The old buildings were subsequently demolished to make way for housing.

Postcard, 1905

See: Grimsby: Making the Town  by Alan Dowling

Grimsby, hospital, West Marsh
Horncastle, Old Dispensary
Horncastle, Old Dispensary
Horncastle, Old Dispensary

This Dispensary was opened in 1789 and offered 'Medical aid to the Poor'.

It was one of the first such establishments in Lincolnshire and was sponsored by Sir Joseph Banks. It was in use until 1866.

O.S. Grid Ref. TF25851 69508

Kathy Holland, 2013

Horncastle, dispensary, Joseph Banks
Lincoln, Lincoln School, WW1 Hospital
Lincoln, Lincoln School, WW1 Hospital
Lincoln, Lincoln School, WW1 Hospital

The 4th Northern General Hospital was set up in Lincoln School on Wragby Road at the beginning of World War I in August 1914.

By early October, the hospital cared for over 200 wounded Belgian soldiers. Many of the wards were in wooden buildings which had been quickly erected on the school playing field.

The school itself was housed in temporary classrooms at the junction of St Anne's Road and Sewell Road.

Undated postcard

Lincoln School, Wragby Road, World War I, Northern General Hospital,
Louth, Crowtree Lane Hospital
Louth, Crowtree Lane Hospital
Louth, Crowtree Lane Hospital

Crowtree Lane Hospital was built in 1873 at a cost of £2000 to replace the dispensary in New Street.

After the former workhouse on High Holme Road was developed as the main hospital for the town in 1938, Crowtree Lane dealt with maternity patients only.

It is now part of King Edward VI School.

Ken Redmore, 2006

Louth, Crowtree Lane Hospital,
Mablethorpe, Convalescent Home
Mablethorpe, Convalescent Home
Mablethorpe, Convalescent Home

James Fowler, architect of Louth, designed this home close to the seafront for 53 patients with separate accommodation for males and females on a plan approved by Florence Nightingale.

The home opened in 1871 at a cost of £3800; it was demolished in the 1980s.

From original drawing by James Fowler


Mablethorpe, James Fowler, convalescent home
Skegness, Carey House
Skegness, Carey House
Skegness, Carey House

The Nottingham and Nottinghamshire Convalescent Homes were established at Castle Donington for women (1883), and at Seathorne (Skegness) for men (1891) and children (1893).

In 1922 it was decided to close the children's home, sell the women's home, and acquire temporary premises in the Skegness area.

A new women's home, Carey House, was opened in Skegness in 1932.

The Convalescent Homes passed to the National Health Service in 1948.

photograph dated 1958

Skegness, Carey House convalescent home
Skegness, Holiday Camp
Skegness, Holiday Camp
Skegness, Holiday Camp

The Derbyshire Miners' Welfare Holiday Camp at Winthorpe to the north end of Skegness was opened in May 1939.

It was the first development of the type to be constructed in this country.

Undated postcard

Skegness, Derbyshire, Miners' Welfare Home,
Skegness, Hospital
Skegness, Hospital
Skegness, Hospital

Skegness Cottage Hospital - as it was originally known - was funded by public subscription and was officially opened on 19 May 1913.

The hospital was subsequently extended on several occasions. It was later known as the Skegness and District Hospital.

The Hospital passed to the National Health Service in 1948.

Illustration from 1913

Skegness, hospital operating theatre
Skegness, hospital staff
Skegness, hospital staff
Skegness, hospital staff
The staff of Skegness Hospital in 1948
Skegness, hospital staff