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Settlement - Pubs and Hotels
 
Bourne, Burghley Arms
Bourne, Burghley Arms
Bourne, Burghley Arms

A much altered building, with modern Tudor style windows and coach arch.

Listed by English Heritage as the birthplace of William Cecil, chief advisor to Elizabeth 1st.

Frank Robinson, September 2011

Bourne, Burghley Arms hotel, William Cecil
Brigg, Angel Hotel
Brigg, Angel Hotel
Brigg, Angel Hotel

The Angel Hotel stands on the south side of the Market Place.

The enclosed courtyard to the east of the hotel was once the passage giving access to stables in the yard at the rear.

postcard by Kinsway, 1933

Brigg, Angel Hotel, Kinsway
Eastville, Wheatsheaf public house
Eastville, Wheatsheaf public house
Eastville, Wheatsheaf public house

Looking north at the junction of the Fodder Dyke and the Spilsby Road (about a quarter of a mile west of the railway station).

The Wheatsheaf pub is to the left of the photograph.

Postcard, 1930s

Eastville, New Leake, Wheatsheaf public house
Folkingham, The Greyhound Inn
Folkingham, The Greyhound Inn
Folkingham, The Greyhound Inn

The Greyhound in Folkingham was once a well known coaching inn on the Lincoln to London road, about 8 miles south of Sleaford (TF 072337).

The imposing red brick frontage was built in the 18th century and an Assize Court and Assembly Room were included in the building.

The Greyhound is now converted into apartments.

Frank Robinson, 2010

Folkingham, Assize, Assembly, coaching,
Friskney, The Anchor
Friskney, The Anchor
Friskney, The Anchor

The Anchor (dated 1850 above the door in the entrance porch) is the building on the left (close to the eastern wall of the churchyard).

At that time it was one of five pubs in the village: The Good Intent was just along the road (opposite the School), The Three Tuns at the foot of Wright’s Lane, The Bricklayer’s Arms (The Middle House) on the Friskney Eaudyke, The Barley Mow at the junction of Sea Lane and the main Boston-Skegness road, and the New Inn at the village boundary on the Fodder Dyke Bank.

The Anchor and the Barley Mow are the only two survivors.

Friskney, The Anchor. Barley Mow, Bricklayer's Arms
Grantham, Angel and Royal Hotel
Grantham, Angel and Royal Hotel
Grantham, Angel and Royal Hotel

This view looking south along High Street includes the historic Angel and Royal Hotel in the left foreground.

Originally the Angel Inn, the hotel is the oldest secular building in Grantham – possibly as early as 1200.

In the yard behind the façade are stables and outbuildings surviving from the coaching days of the 18th and 19th centuries.

Undated postcard

Grantham, stables, coaching, 1200,
Grantham, Angel and Royal Hotel
Grantham, Angel and Royal Hotel
Grantham, Angel and Royal Hotel

Originally the Angel Inn, the Angel and Royal Hotel is the oldest secular building in Grantham – possibly as early as 1200.

In the yard behind the façade are stables and outbuildings surviving from the coaching days of the 18th and 19th centuries.

Grantham, Angel & Royal Hotel
Grantham, Angel and Royal Hotel
Grantham, Angel and Royal Hotel
Grantham, Angel and Royal Hotel

The gatehouse of this inn dates from the mid-C15th. Richard III held Court here in October 1483 receiving the Great Seal which had been sent for from London.

These events took place in the King's Room on the first floor of the building which has an oriel window looking across into the Market Place.

The Great Seal was used to sign the warrant for the execution of his cousin and former ally the Duke of Buckingham.  Charles I held Court here in 1633.

The inn was acquired by the Cust family who extended it in about 1776  with a four-storey north range some 14 bays long to cater for coach travellers on the Great North Road as well as visitors to the Belvoir Hunt

postcard by Whipple of Grantham, 1903

Grantham, angel and Royal inn hotel, Cust, King Charles I
Grantham, George Hotel
Grantham, George Hotel
Grantham, George Hotel

The former George Hotel was built in the late eighteenth century, replacing a hostelry on the same site.

The large archway to the left was originally the entrance for coaches which travelled along the Great North Road running immediately in front of the building. (It is remarkable that sheep are being driven along this major road.)

Later this section was converted into garages.

In 1989 the George closed and was converted into a shopping centre.

Postcard, 1905

Grantham, George Hotel
Grantham, George Hotel
Grantham, George Hotel
Grantham, George Hotel

The George Hotel was rebuilt in 1780 with an impressive brick façade. The central archway led through to stabling and service quarters at the rear which could be accessed from Westgate.

The George Inn is recorded as early as 1456 and was part of the manor of Grantham. The rebuilding of 1780 by John Manners was almost certainly in response to the new range added to the Angel Inn some four years previously.

The George is now a shopping centre and two Blue Plaques can be found in the internal atrium. One is to Thomas Paine, author of the Rights of Man and The Age of Reason, who as an excise man was based at the George Inn between 1762-64. The other is to Charles Dickens who stayed here in 1838.

postcard by Whipple of Grantham, 1903

Grantham, George Hotel, John Manners
Grantham, Living Sign
Grantham, Living Sign
Grantham, Living Sign

The Beehive pub on Castlegate has a real beehive as its sign. Under it a plaque with the following rhyme:

Stop Traveller! This wondrous sign explore
And say, when thou has viewed it o'er,
Grantham, now two rarities are thine:
A lofty steeple and a living sign

undated post card

Grantham, Beehive pub, living sign, Castlegate
Halton Holegate, Street Scene
Halton Holegate, Street Scene
Halton Holegate, Street Scene

The small village of Halton Holegate lies 1 mile east of Spilsby.

It had a railway station on the Firsby Junction to Spilsby branch line which opened in 1868. Passenger services ended in 1939 and the line closed completely in 1958.

The Bell Inn, shown here on the left, is still open for business.

The fringe of the churchyard of St Andrew's appears on the right.

undated postcard

Halton Holegate, Bell Inn, Firsby to Spilsby railway
Horncastle, Fighting Cocks public house
Horncastle, Fighting Cocks public house
Horncastle, Fighting Cocks public house

At the eastern end of West Street, the Fighting Cooks, a public house with a long history.

Like other old inns in the town it had plenty of stabling for patrons as well as the carriers who travelled to and from villages to the west of Horncastle.

undated postcard

Horncastle, Fighting Cocks public house
Immingham, County Hotel
Immingham, County Hotel
Immingham, County Hotel

This large hotel on Pelham Road was built in 1913.

Eminent visitors to the hotel include King George V and Lord Louis Mountbatten.

postcard by Fitzwilliams, Ilford, undated

Immingham, County Hotel
Lincoln, Old School
Lincoln, Old School
Lincoln, Old School

This building, now the Castle Hotel on Westgate, was erected in 1851-52 by W A Nicholson as the North District National Schools.

October 2017

Schools and Universities, Castle Hotel, Lincoln, North District national School
New Bolingbroke, Village Street
New Bolingbroke, Village Street
New Bolingbroke, Village Street

In theis view along the main road through New Bolingbroke (present B1183) the Globe public house is on the right with Soulby's brewery alongside.

undated postcard

New Bolingbroke, Globe pub, Soulby brewery
Saltfleet, New Inn
Saltfleet, New Inn
Saltfleet, New Inn

Much of the New Inn dates from the eighteenth century when Saltfleet was a small port and became a centre for sea bathing.

The diarist John Byng was however unimpressed, describing Saltfleet in 1791 as 'a poor place under the sea bank with a wretched inn-bathing house' - i.e. the New Inn, pictured here.

Frank Robinson, 2008

Saltfleet, New Inn,
Skegness, Hildred's Hotel
Skegness, Hildred's Hotel
Skegness, Hildred's Hotel

To the left, on High Street, Skegness, is Hildred's Hotel, which was established in the mid-nineteenth century well before the explosive growth of Skegness as a seaside resort.

It is close to the point where High Street and Lumley Road converge. This early twentieth century photograph looks westwards away from the sea and provides a view down both streets.

The hotel is now the site of a small shopping arcade.

Undated postcard

Skegness, Hildred's Hotel, Lumley Road
Stamford, George Hotel
Stamford, George Hotel
Stamford, George Hotel

The George Hotel was in existence as an inn by 1568.

Much of the present building dates from the eighteenth century.

This rear courtyard gives some impression of the size and importance of this coaching inn.

undated postcard

Stamford, George Hotel
Tealby, The King's Head
Tealby, The King's Head
Tealby, The King's Head

This well-known village pub claims to have its origins in the 1360s, though the thatched mud and stud building shown here is listed by National Heritage as 17th century.

It continues to be a popular pub and restaurant.

See: National Heritage List for England

Tealby, King's Head, public house, thatched
Theddlethorpe St Helen, The King's  Head
Theddlethorpe St Helen, The King's  Head
Theddlethorpe St Helen, The King's  Head

This attractive public house was originally a cottage built in the 16th century and extended later.

It first became an inn in 1830, named in honour of William IV.

During the 1914-18 War D H Lawrence was a frequent visitor.

Hugh D Martineau, c.1980

Theddlethorpe St Helen, the King's Head inn
Washingborough, Hunter's Leap Pub
Washingborough, Hunter's Leap Pub
Washingborough, Hunter's Leap Pub

Hunter’s Leap pub is immediately on the left, at the top of the Oak Hill.

This view, looking south, shows what were probably the last thatched houses in Washingborough.

Washingborough, Hunters Leap, thatched houses
Woodhall Spa, Petwood Hotel
Woodhall Spa, Petwood Hotel
Woodhall Spa, Petwood Hotel

Woodhall Spa, Petwood Hotel
Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel
Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel
Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel

The Victoria Hotel at Woodhall was still profitable in 1920 when it was destroyed by fire.

Postcard, undated

Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel, fire,
Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel
Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel
Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel

The Victoria Hotel, showing here the new suites of rooms with balconies added in 1906.

Postcard, undated

Woodhall Spa,
Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel
Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel
Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel

The original Victoria Hotel opened in 1839, and catered for visitors to the recently opened bath house.

As Woodhall Spa 'took off' as a fashionable resort, the hotel expanded greatly, to provide appropriate accommodation for its 'society' guests.

 

Postcard, undated

Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel,
Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel
Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel
Woodhall Spa, Victoria Hotel

The Victoria Hotel, at the junction of Spa and Coronation Roads, was ideally placed for visitors to the bath house.

As Woodhall Spa 'took off' as a fashionable resort, the hotel expanded greatly, to provide appropriate accommodation for its 'society' guests.

Shown here are new suites of rooms with balconies added in 1906.

Postcard, undated

Woodhall Spa,