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Settlement - Towns and Villages
 
Alford, Church Street
Alford, Church Street
Alford, Church Street

Alford is a market town lying at the foot of the Lincolnshire Wolds.

It has a working five-sailed windmill and a thatched manor house open to the public.

This photograph is taken from St Wilfrid's churchyard looking ahead to West Street.

Undated postcard

Alford, Church Street
Bag Enderby, lane and cottage
Bag Enderby, lane and cottage
Bag Enderby, lane and cottage

Bag Enderby is a hamlet in the Lincolnshire Wolds 6 miles north east of Horncastle.

George Clayton Tennyson, father of Lord Tennyson, was Rector here from 1807 to 1831.

The cottage in this painting is of mud and stud construction, a common building material in this part of the County.

Postcard, dated 1920

Bag Enderby, George Clayton Tennyson, mud and stud
Bassingham, High Street
Bassingham, High Street
Bassingham, High Street

The little cottage on the left was a shop for many years. The first owner in the 20th century was Elsam, then Steel (circa 1922) and finally George and Blanche Bates (circa 1938).  Mrs.Bates closed the shop with the introduction of VAT.

The building is on High Street, Bassingham, close to the school, the War Memorial, the Church and the Old Rectory (now a Nursing Home.)  Being a 'sweet shop' it was a popular place with the children.

In the distance is the blacksmith’s with horses waiting on the road.

This is one of the older parts of the village. When the photograph was taken Martin’s stackyard was on the other side of the road.

Post card, c.1925
Notes from Mrs Helen Ash

Bassingham, shop, Steel
Baston, Main Street
Baston, Main Street
Baston, Main Street

Baston is a village of some 1500 people on the edge of the Fens between Bourne and Market Deeping.  The busy A15 passes through the edge of the village.

An Anglo-Saxon cemetery of funerary urns was discovered here in 1851.

undated postcard, probably 1920s

Baston, Anglo-Saxon cemetery, funerary urns
Billingborough, Street Scene
Billingborough, Street Scene
Billingborough, Street Scene
undated postcard
Billingborough, street scene
Billingborough, Street Scene
Billingborough, Street Scene
Billingborough, Street Scene

Billingborough lies between Sleaford and Bourne. It has a population of some 1400.

Its parish church is largely in the Decorated style with a late nineteenth-century chancel.

The Fortescue Arms dates back several centuries.

undated postcard

Billingborough, street scene
Blankney, street scene
Blankney, street scene
Blankney, street scene
Post card, c.1912
Blankney,
Braceborough, Street Scene
Braceborough, Street Scene
Braceborough, Street Scene

Braceborough is a hamlet in South Kesteven. It had a station on the Essendine to Bourne railway which closed in 1951.

Dr Francis Willis treated King George III for his ‘madness’ in nearby Shillingthorpe Hall (demolished in 1949). A Spa House was opened in 1841. Popular in Victorian times, it closed in 1939.

Braceborough, Francis Willis, Shillingthorpe Hall, Spa
Branston, High Street
Branston, High Street
Branston, High Street

This photograph taken in c.1930 looks south from Lincoln Road along High Street towards the centre of the village with the All Saints church and the Waggon and Horses public house in the distance.

On the right is the parish Reading Room.

Courtesy, Mrs Bellamy
Branston, road, reading room,
Brigg, Bigby Street
Brigg, Bigby Street
Brigg, Bigby Street

An early view along Bigby Street, looking east towards the parish church and Methodist Church.

postcard in Wrench Series published by Jackson & Sons of Brigg, undated

Brigg, Bigby Street, Wrench Series, Jackson & Sons
Caistor, Tower House Lane
Caistor, Tower House Lane
Caistor, Tower House Lane

Tower House Lane - later Back Lane, now Mill Lane -  joins Grimsby Road at the north-east edge of the town centre.

postcard, 1905

Caistor, Tower House Lane
Carlton le Moorland, Street Scene
Carlton le Moorland, Street Scene
Carlton le Moorland, Street Scene
Caption to follow
Carlton le Moorland,
Chapel St Leonards, Pullover
Chapel St Leonards, Pullover
Chapel St Leonards, Pullover

This small coastal resort – originally Mumby Chapel - developed after the First World War when building on the Lincolnshire sand dunes became permissible.

In the late Victorian period there was a lifeboat station for a few years (1879-98) and in the 1930s motor cycling racing took place on the extensive smooth sands.

This view is from the sea bank looking westward to the small retail area.

Postcard, 1938

Chapel St Leonards, pullover
Cleethorpes, Grimsby Road
Cleethorpes, Grimsby Road
Cleethorpes, Grimsby Road

The Enclosure Award Commissioner set out a ‘Public Carriage Road of the breadth of thirty feet called the Grimsby Road’ in 1846.

It contains St Aidan’s Church of 1906, the Constitutional Club of 1911/12 and the Memorial Hall (1960).

undated postcard

Cleethorpes, Grimsby Road, St Aidan chruch
Deeping St James, Eastgate
Deeping St James, Eastgate
Deeping St James, Eastgate

Deeping St James, lying 1 mile east of Market Deeping, was built around a twelfth-century Benedictine Abbey destroyed at the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

The village has an eighteenth-century lock-up built on the site and with the materials of a medieval wayside cross.

A railway station opened in 1848 and closed in 1964.

postcard mailed in 1911

Deeping St James, Benedictine Abbey, lock-up, wayside cross
Faldingworth, Main Street
Faldingworth, Main Street
Faldingworth, Main Street

Faldingworth is a small village on the A46 5 miles south west of Market Rasen.

This view of the main street looks east from the Buslingthorpe Road junction.

Its church contains memorials to Second World War Polish airmen stationed at RAF Faldingworth.

undated postcard

Faldingworth, Main Street
Faldingworth, Main Street
Faldingworth, Main Street
Faldingworth, Main Street

Faldingworth is a small village on the A46 5 miles south west of Market Rasen.

This view looks east.

undated postcard

Faldingworth, Main Street
Faldingworth, Main Street
Faldingworth, Main Street
Faldingworth, Main Street

Faldingworth is a small village on the A46 5 miles south west of Market Rasen.

This photograph taken from near the Methodist Chapel shows cottages on the north side of the street with the spire of All Saints' church in the background.

Its church contains memorials to Second World War Polish airmen stationed at RAF Faldingworth.

undated postcard

Faldingworth, Main Street
Fillingham, street scene
Fillingham, street scene
Fillingham, street scene
undated postcard
Fillingham, street scene
Friskney, Fold Hill
Friskney, Fold Hill
Friskney, Fold Hill

Looking north east towards the junction between Church  Road, Field Lane and Wright’s Lane (Panton’s Corner).

The sails of Kitching’s Mill are just visible behind the buildings in the centre of the photograph.

Postcard: date stamp 1905 (Edward VII)

Friskney, Fold Hill, Kitching's Mill, Panton's Corner
Friskney, kissing gate
Friskney, kissing gate
Friskney, kissing gate

This kissing gate stood at the east end of junction of Chapel Lane and Field Lane (the eastern end of this path is called Wash Dyke Lane).

The public right of way still exists but the gate is long gone.

Postcard: c1930

Friskney, kissing gate, wash dyke lane
Friskney, The Avenue
Friskney, The Avenue
Friskney, The Avenue

This is a magnifient avenue of elms about a quarter of a mile north of the church.

It was felled around 1960 (as were the elms in the churchyard) and now survives in name only.

Postcard: c1930

Friskney, The Avenue, elms
Fulbeck, Street Scene
Fulbeck, Street Scene
Fulbeck, Street Scene
Fulbeck, street scene
Fulbeck, Street Scene
Fulbeck, Street Scene
Fulbeck, Street Scene

Fulbeck lies on the A607 14 miles north of Grantham. It has the home of the Fane family since 1632.

Fulbeck Hall served as the headquarters of the 1st Airborne Division before the Arnhem operation. RAF Fulbeck housed 2 Lancaster squadrons from October 1944 until the end of the war.

undated postcard

Fulbeck, Fane, RAF Fulbeck
Gainsborough, Market Place
Gainsborough, Market Place
Gainsborough, Market Place

Gainsborough is a red brick town, important in the wool trade in Medieval times and significant when the engineers Marshall, Sons & Co thrived in the nineteenth century. For much of the twentieth century it was in decline.

The Market Place is small and unremarkable. The building in the background of this photograph is the Town Hall.

Pevsner only records "the robust Neo-Georgian National Provincial Bank, 1926 by F C R Palmer".

postcard, 1907

Gainsborough, Market Place
Goxhill, Howe Street
Goxhill, Howe Street
Goxhill, Howe Street

A view of Howe Street, showing ladies in long Edwardian dresses and a boy in knicker-bockers.

This rural scene, with no car to be seen, contains two early bicycles and a baby carriage pushed by the lady in the centre of the village street.

Postcard, c1910

Goxhill, knicker-bockers, bicycles,
Grantham, Angel and Royal Hotel
Grantham, Angel and Royal Hotel
Grantham, Angel and Royal Hotel

This view looking south along High Street includes the historic Angel and Royal Hotel in the left foreground.

Originally the Angel Inn, the hotel is the oldest secular building in Grantham – possibly as early as 1200.

In the yard behind the façade are stables and outbuildings surviving from the coaching days of the 18th and 19th centuries.

Undated postcard

Grantham, stables, coaching, 1200,
Grantham, High Street
Grantham, High Street
Grantham, High Street

The viewpoint for this 1950s photograph is St Peter's Hill, looking northwards towards High Street.

At the time, this relatively quiet street was in fact the Great North Road.

Undated postcard

 

Grantham, St Peter's Hill, great North Road,
Grantham, St Peter's Hill
Grantham, St Peter's Hill
Grantham, St Peter's Hill

Looking north along St Peter's Hill Grantham in the 1950s. The tall building right of centre is the town Guildhall, designed by William Watkins of Lincoln and completed in 1868.

It was originally flanked by offices for the Chief Constable and the Inspector of Weights and Measures.

Later the Town Museum was constructed immediately to the south side of the Guildhall (as shown here).

Undated postcard

Grantham,
Grasby, Street Scene
Grasby, Street Scene
Grasby, Street Scene

Grasby is a small village sited 3 miles north-west of Caistor.

Charles Tennyson Turner, brother of Alfred Tennyson, was rector of Grasby from 1837 until his death in 1879.

undated postcard

Grasby, street scene, Charles Tennyson Turner
Grimsby, Victoria Street
Grimsby, Victoria Street
Grimsby, Victoria Street

Victoria Street is one of the principal streets in the town.

undated postcard

Grimsby, Victoria Street
Grimsthorpe, Street Scene
Grimsthorpe, Street Scene
Grimsthorpe, Street Scene

Grimsthorpe is a hamlet in the parish of Edenham sited 3 miles north-west of Bourne.

Close by is Grimsthorpe Castle, home to the Willoughby de Eresbys for centuries.

This postcard was posted in 1905.

Grimsthorpe, Willoughby de Eresby, Edenham
Habrough, Station Road
Habrough, Station Road
Habrough, Station Road

Habrough lies 8 miles north-west of Grimsby.

Its railway station opened in 1848. The Station Hotel still offers rooms.

This postcard dates from around 1920.

Habrough, Station Road, Station Hotel
Halton Holegate, Street Scene
Halton Holegate, Street Scene
Halton Holegate, Street Scene

The small village of Halton Holegate lies 1 mile east of Spilsby.

It had a railway station on the Firsby Junction to Spilsby branch line which opened in 1868. Passenger services ended in 1939 and the line closed completely in 1958.

The Bell Inn, shown here on the left, is still open for business.

The fringe of the churchyard of St Andrew's appears on the right.

undated postcard

Halton Holegate, Bell Inn, Firsby to Spilsby railway
Heckington, Church Street
Heckington, Church Street
Heckington, Church Street
undated postcard
Heckington, Church Street
Heighington, High Street
Heighington, High Street
Heighington, High Street

The High Street looking west towards the Post Office corner. The telegraph pole on the RHS stands in front of the railings of the Village Hall and pub carpark.

Just past the Butcher and Beast is Hufton’s Blacksmith shop, by this time it sold Shell petrol from a tank under the floor, through a long arm over the pavement.

The stone houses past this, with railings in front, were taken down in the 1950s. During the War soldiers had been billeted in their long attic range, where perhaps the boarders at the Boys’ School had slept.

The house at the end of the view was the School Master’s House (owned by Garrett's Charity), the house to its left was the house and surgery of three consecutive families of doctors from about 1927 to the early 1990s.

Heighington, High Street, Hufton blacksmith
Heighington, Post Office
Heighington, Post Office
Heighington, Post Office

Red brick, green tiled front of Heighington Post Office, the double-fronted building on the left.

Its stone front had been demolished in the early 1920s when "The cart got away with the ’oss” coming down the hill opposite.

The Robinson family moved from their Monks Road shop and re-built the front and ran it as the Post Office and general store for two generations.

The adjoining cottage now has the left hand side door blocked up.

Heighington, Post Office, Robinson
Heighington, Station Road
Heighington, Station Road
Heighington, Station Road

Station Road looking east towards the village from the right-angle bend onto Station Hill.

The Grange on the left hand side, then Beckfield (the Beck runs behind it, parallel to the road), and the view is closed by the old Methodist Chapel School Room.

Heighington, Station Road, Beckfield House, Grange, Methodist Chapel
Heighington, The Beck
Heighington, The Beck
Heighington, The Beck

Heighington Beck, west from the High Street to the three-storey watermill.

Mr Frank East lived in the semi-detached brick house on the left, built by his (stone mason) father on the site of his old thatched stone house in spring 1893.

The October Village Feast had been held on the old site as building work could not start in the winter because of the effect of frost on the mortar.

Heighington, Beck, Watermill
Holbeach, Church Street
Holbeach, Church Street
Holbeach, Church Street
Undated postcard
Holbeach, Church Street
Horncastle, Bull Ring
Horncastle, Bull Ring
Horncastle, Bull Ring

View of the Bull Ring looking northwards from the Town Bridge (over the river Waring).

This was one of the areas of the town taken over by the huge horse fair during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Postcard, 1910

Horncastle, Bull Ring, Horse Fair, Town Bridge,
Horncastle, High Street
Horncastle, High Street
Horncastle, High Street

This Edwardian photograph gives a view westwards along High Street towards the Market Place.

On the left in the forground is the Corn Exchange, later converted into the Victory cinema.

On the right before the Market Place is Joseph Banks's house, with the "drum clock" attached at first floor level.

Horncastle, High Street, Corn exchange, Victory cinema, Joseph Banks, drum clock,
Horncastle, Market Place
Horncastle, Market Place
Horncastle, Market Place

This undated (pre-1866) painting by E Roberts shows the Old Vicarage at the end of the Market Place with edge of the Punch House showing on the extreme left.

The Market Place contained a series of small shops and shacks, shown here on the right, which were cleared away in 1862.

This view shows (on the extreme right foreground) the north side of the High Street frontage leading into the Market Place.

Courtesy Pearl Wheatley

Horncastle, Market Place, E Roberts, painting, Punch House, Old Vicarage,
Lincoln, Broadgate
Lincoln, Broadgate
Lincoln, Broadgate

Broadgate, the principal north-south street parallel to Lincoln's High Street, gives an impressive, uninterrupted view of the Cathedral.

In the foreground is the junction between Clasketgate & Silver Street (to the left), Monks Road (right) and Lindum Hill (ahead).

This is a postcard of a painting by Arthur C Payne, probably dating from the inter-war period.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, Broadgate, Arthur Payne, Cathedral,
Lincoln, Castle Hill
Lincoln, Castle Hill
Lincoln, Castle Hill

The area between Exchequer Gate and the Castle in Lincoln, known as Castle Hill, is cobbled.

The timber-framed building on the corner of Bailgate, formerly a bank and now the local tourist office, has two overhangs and three gables.

On the north side of the hill towards the castle are fine 18th and 19th century houses.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, Castle Hill, Castle, Bailgate,
Lincoln, High Street
Lincoln, High Street
Lincoln, High Street

This view of the High Street looks northwards from the top floor of the present Lloyds Bank.

To the right of the Stonebow in the middle distance can be seen the tower of St Peter at Arches and the Cathedral.

In the centre foreground is the stone obelisk which stood on the eastern side of the High Bridge.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, High Street, Stonebow, obelisk,
Lincoln, High Street
Lincoln, High Street
Lincoln, High Street

Shops on the High Bridge, Lincoln, viewed from the south-east.

The date is after the 1902 restoration, probably in the 1920s.

Postcard

Lincoln, High Street, High Bridge,
Lincoln, High Street
Lincoln, High Street
Lincoln, High Street

Another view of the High Street looks northwards from the top floor of the present Lloyds Bank or an adjacent building.

To the right of the Stonebow in the middle distance can be seen the tower of St Peter at Arches (see above) and the Cathedral.

In the centre foreground is the stone obelisk which stood on the eastern side of the High Bridge.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, High Street, Stonebow, St Peter at Arches, obelisk,
Lincoln, Linton Place
Lincoln, Linton Place
Lincoln, Linton Place

This small terrace was off the lower High Street close to St Peter at Gowt’s Church.

Like most industrial cities which expanded rapidly in the nineteenth century, Lincoln had large areas of back-to-back, high density housing.

Linton Place was demolished in the 1930s.

Postcard, 1901

Streets, Lincoln, Linton Place, St Peter Gowts
Lincoln, Lower High Street
Lincoln, Lower High Street
Lincoln, Lower High Street

This section of Lincoln's High Street has changed little in the half century or so since this photograph was taken.

St Mary's Guildhall, on the right, built in the 12th century, has had many uses over the years.

It is owned by the City Council and leased to Lincoln Civic Trust, who restored the building in 1984.

A section of the original Roman Fosse way - complete with wheel ruts - can be viewed through a glass panel in the main ground floor room.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, Lowere High Street, St Mary's Guiildhall, Civic Trust,
Lincoln, Royal Show, 1907
Lincoln, Royal Show, 1907
Lincoln, Royal Show, 1907

When the Royal Show was held in Lincoln in 1907 more than 100,000 visitors came, mainly by rail.

The principal streets of the city were decorated.  This arch over High Street was topped by a portable steam engine, symbol of Lincoln’s engineering industry.

The single carriage in the photograph carries King Edward VII.

Postcard, 1907

Occasions, Royal Show 1907, High Street
Lincoln, St Swithun's&nbspSquare
Lincoln, St Swithun's Square
Lincoln, St Swithun's Square

The church of St Swithun is to the left and Broadgate at the end of the street.

Postcard, 1920

Streets, Lincoln, Silver Street, St Swithun
Louth, Little Eastgate
Louth, Little Eastgate
Louth, Little Eastgate

The view from the tower of St James's Church, Louth, looking towards the town centre along Little Eastgate is remarkably similar to that depicted in a fine panorama painted by William Brown in 1844.

The street leading away in the centre of the picture is Eastgate, dominated by the Town Hall of 1854, a large brick building with stone dressings and balustrade.

Brown's Panorama hangs in the Council Chamber.

Mark Acton, 2008

Louth, view from church tower, Eastgate, Brown panorama, Town Hall,
Ludford, Post Office
Ludford, Post Office
Ludford, Post Office

Ludford is made up of the parishes of Ludford Parva and Ludford Magna.

It is twinned with Voué in France where a Lancaster bomber from RAF Ludford Magna crashed during the Second World War.

In February 2008 the village was the epicentre of an earthquake. Needless to say, it no longer has a post office cum garage (earthquake not to blame).

undated postcard

Ludford, Post Office
Market Rasen, Queen Street
Market Rasen, Queen Street
Market Rasen, Queen Street

Queen Street, the main shopping street in the centre of Market Rasen, for a long time carried not only the A631 Gainsborough-Louth traffic but also that on the A46 between Lincoln and Grimsby.

Here, in a pre-war photograph, looking west towards Louth, an unusual road sign indicates the left turn down George Street towards Caistor, Brigg and Grimsby. (The A46 now by-passes the town.)

Undated postcard

Market Rasen, Queen Street,
Middle Rasen, Gainsborough Road
Middle Rasen, Gainsborough Road
Middle Rasen, Gainsborough Road

Middle Rasen lies 1.5 miles west of the town of Market Rasen. It consists of the merged villages of Middle Rasen Drax (from Drax Priory in Yorkshire which held land in medieval times) and Middle Rasen Tupholme (from Tupholme Abbey in Lincolnshire).

This photograph is of the main street (now the A631) with the Methodist Chapel on the left.

postcard, undated

Middle Rasen, Main Street, Drax, Tupholme
Morton by Bourne, Street Scene
Morton by Bourne, Street Scene
Morton by Bourne, Street Scene

Morton and Hanthorpe was formerly known as Morton by Bourne. It lies 2 miles north of Bourne. Morton sits on the fen side of the A15 whilst Hanthorpe is on the upland side.

George Hussey Packe, MP for South Lincolnshire from 1859 to 1868 and Chairman of the Great Northern Railway, was born in Hanthorpe Hall in 1796.

This postcard was posted in 1943

Morton by Bourne, Hanthorpe, George Hussey Packe
Nettleton, Street Scene
Nettleton, Street Scene
Nettleton, Street Scene

Nettleton lies less than a mile from Caistor.

Much ironstone mining took place in the surrounding countryside.

undated postcard

Nettleton, street scene
North Kelsey, street scene
North Kelsey, street scene
North Kelsey, street scene

North Kelsey is a village of some 900 people 4 miles west of Caistor.

It has an Anglican church and a Methodist chapel.

Its railway station, out at North Kelsey Moor, closed in 1965.

undated postcard

North Kelsey, North Kelsey Moor
North Kyme, Main Street
North Kyme, Main Street
North Kyme, Main Street

North Kyme is sited 1.5 miles south of Billinghay in North Kesteven. It has a brick church built in 1877.

The village cross is fourteenth-century and was restored in the 1820s.

This quiet village street is now the busy A153 linking Sleaford with Horncastle.

undated postcard

North Kyme, village cross
Owston Ferry, High Street
Owston Ferry, High Street
Owston Ferry, High Street

Owston Ferry, in the Isle of Axholme, is on the west bank of the River Trent, 9 miles north of Gainsborough.

The motte of a castle, possibly built soon after the Norman Conquest and demolished in 1175-76, can still be seen.

In the nineteenth-century the village was home to a rope-walk, boat-building yard and sacking and sail cloth makers.

undated postcard

Owston Ferry,
Partney, Village Street
Partney, Village Street
Partney, Village Street

This village street in the centre of Partney later became the busy A16 trunk road before the village by-pass was built in 2005.

This view is from the north.

Undated photograph

Partney, street, church, Matthew Flinders,
Pointon, Street Scene
Pointon, Street Scene
Pointon, Street Scene

Pointon lies 7 miles north of Bourne. It is part of the parish of Pointon and Sempringham.

The parish church is the isolated St Andrew’s at Sempringham. A ‘tin tabernacle’ was built in Pointon in 1893 as a Chapel of Ease.

undated postcard

Pointon, street scene, Sempringham
Scampton, village street
Scampton, village street
Scampton, village street

Scampton village lies 5 miles north of Lincoln. Its churchyard contains British, Commonwealth and German war dead.

The Dambusters Inn on the High Street has displays relating to 617 Squadron and is well worth a visit. Nearby RAF Scampton is home to the Red Arrows.

This view looks up the village street in a northerly direction.

postcard, 1923

Scampton,
Scampton, village street
Scampton, village street
Scampton, village street

Scampton village lies 5 miles north of Lincoln. Its churchyard contains British, Commonwealth and German war dead. The Dambusters Inn on the High Street has displays relating to 617 Squadron and is well worth a visit. Nearby RAF Scampton is home to the Red Arrows.

postcard, 1932

Scampton,
Scawby, West Street
Scawby, West Street
Scawby, West Street

West Street is the main street (B1207) running through the village centre.

This view looking south shows the Sutton Arms on the right.

Elsewhere in the village is a mixture of estate cottages dating fromn the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Frith postcard, undated

Scawby, West Street, Frith
Skegness, Lumley Road
Skegness, Lumley Road
Skegness, Lumley Road

Lumley Road and High Street Skegness converge at a point close to the foreshore.

This early twentieth century photograph looks westwards away from the sea and provides a view down both streets.

To the left, on High Street, is Hildred's Hotel, which was established in the mid-nineteenth century well before the explosive growth of Skegness as a seaside resort.

The hotel is now the site of a small shopping arcade.

Undated postcard

Skegness, Lumley Road, High Street, Hildred's Hotel,
Skegness, Lumley Road
Skegness, Lumley Road
Skegness, Lumley Road

The view down Lumley Road, Skegness, towards the sea.

Most of the town's retail businesses were situated along this road and on High Street, which runs roughly parallel to it.

At the far end is the Clock Tower, 56 feet high, built in 1898-99 to celebrate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee.

(Lumley is one of family names of the Earls of Scarbrough, principal landowner in the town.)


Undated postcard

Skegness, Lumley Road, Clock Tower, Earl of Scarbrough,
Skendleby, main street
Skendleby, main street
Skendleby, main street

Skendleby is a small village 4 miles north east of Spilsby.

The possible remains of St James Chapel, Skendleby Priory, were excavated in 2005.

Nearby RAF Skendleby operated as a Chain Home Low radar station between 1941-45 and served as a ground control intercept station during the Cold War.

Skendleby, school
Sleaford, High Street
Sleaford, High Street
Sleaford, High Street

An early twentieth century view looking northwards from the Handley Monument up the High Street, Sleaford's principal shopping street.

undated postcard

Sleaford, High Street
South Kelsey, Caistor Road
South Kelsey, Caistor Road
South Kelsey, Caistor Road

South Kelsey lies 4.5 miles south east of Caistor.

The manor of South Kelsey was held by the Hansard and Ayscough families in the Middle Ages.

The Protestant martyr Anne Ayscough or Askew lived in the village for a time.

postcard published by C. Dannatt, Post Office, South Kelsey

South Kelsey, Anne Ayscough, Askew, Hansard
South Willingham, cottage
South Willingham, cottage
South Willingham, cottage

South Willingham is a village lying 8 miles south east of Market Rasen. It had a railway station on the Louth to Bardney line.

The cottage in the centre is made of mud and stud, a common method of construction in the east of the county

undated postcard

South Willingham,
South Willingham, street scene
South Willingham, street scene
South Willingham, street scene
South Willingham, street scene
Spilsby, High Street
Spilsby, High Street
Spilsby, High Street

Spilsby is a market town in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire.

The explorer Sir John Franklin was a native.

A branch line to the town from Firsby junction on the East Lincolnshire main line ran from 1868 to 1958.

This view looks west with the White Hart in the right background.

undated postcard

Spilsby, John Franklin, White Hart
Sutton Bridge, Bridge Road
Sutton Bridge, Bridge Road
Sutton Bridge, Bridge Road

Sutton Bridge lies 7 miles north of Wisbech close to the border with Norfolk. It has the only flintstone church in Lincolnshire.

King John is rumoured to have lost his treasure close by.

The naturalist Sir Peter Scott lived for a time in the East Lighthouse.

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Sutton Bridge, Bridge Road
Swineshead, stocks
Swineshead, stocks
Swineshead, stocks

Swineshead is a large village 7 miles west of Boston.

Substantial earthworks may have been the site of a twelfth-century castle.

Swineshead Abbey was founded in 1135 as a Savigniac monastery, converted to Cistercian rule in 1147 and was dissolved in 1536.

This view also shows the base of a medieval market cross.

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Swineshead, Savigniac monastery, Cistercian abbey
Tealby, Main Street
Tealby, Main Street
Tealby, Main Street

Tealby, 3 miles north east of Market Rasen, is generally considered to be one of the most beautiful villages in the County.

It was the site of Bayons Manor, a Gothic marvel, built for Charles Tennyson D’Eyncourt between 1836 & 1840. Having become derelict, it was blown up in 1964.

Tealby has a thatched pub, the Kings Head.

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Tealby, Tennyson D'Eyncourt
Waddingham, High Street
Waddingham, High Street
Waddingham, High Street

Waddingham lies close to the A15, 10 miles south east of Scunthorpe.

It was originally two settlements: Stainton and Waddingham. Its present population is around 550.

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Waddingham,
Waddingham, Redbourne Road
Waddingham, Redbourne Road
Waddingham, Redbourne Road

Waddingham lies near the A15, 10 miles south east of Scunthorpe.

It was originally two settlements: Stainton and Wadingham. Its present population is around 550.

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Waddingham,
Washingborough, High Street
Washingborough, High Street
Washingborough, High Street

Washingborough is a large village 3 miles south east of Lincoln.

It lies on the River Witham where much evidence of Bronze Age settlement has been found.

This is a view looking down High Street towards Main Road.  The Ferry Boat Inn is a little way down the street on the left. 

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Washingborough, Ferry Boat Inn
Wellingore
Wellingore
Wellingore

Aram’s Pharmacy and Cycle showroom in Wellingore was formerly owned by Mr Ingham, also a chemist, who extracted teeth without an anaesthetic.

No shops now survive in the village.

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Wellingore, Aram cyle shop, Ingham chemist
Wellingore, view from church tower
Wellingore, view from church tower
Wellingore, view from church tower

This view is from the church tower looks north over the village centre. The mill in the distance, now minus sails, has been converted into a house.

RAF Wellingore opened in 1935 and closed in 1945.

John Gillespie Magee, author of the poem ‘High Flight’, took off from the base on his fatal flight.

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Wellingore, windmill, John Gillespie Magee
Willoughton, Village Pond
Willoughton, Village Pond
Willoughton, Village Pond

Willoughton lies 3 miles south of Kirton Lindsey.

The Knights Templar founded a preceptory there during the reign of King Stephen. After the suppression of the order in 1312 the site passed to the Knights Hospitaller in 1338 and King’s College, Cambridge in 1540.

Earthworks remain.

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Willoughton, village pond, Knights Templar, Hospitaller
Wilsford, Main Street
Wilsford, Main Street
Wilsford, Main Street

Wilsford has a population of some 400 and lies seven miles north east of Grantham.

Amazingly the village retains a pub and a post office/shop.

This view looks north-east down the minor road from Wilsford Heath.  The parish church of St Mary is seen in the background in the centre of the village.

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Wilsford, Main Street
Wragby, Market Place
Wragby, Market Place
Wragby, Market Place

This undated photograph looks northwards towards the junction of the A158 and B1202 roads.

The west side of the Market Place, seen here on the left, is relatively unchanged today.

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Wragby, Market Place