Publications

 

 Ordering Books

Copies of books in print are available from The Postal Sales Manager, SLHA, Jews’ Court, Steep Hill, Lincoln, LN1 2LS (01522 521337) or by using the ORDER FORM.

Second-hand copies of all volumes, including those currently out of print, are occasionally available at the Bookshop.

Trade enquiries are welcomed. Standard terms apply.

SLHA Books
A wide variety of informative books on the history and archaeology of the county

Since 1974 the Society has published numerous informative and well-illustrated books about the history and archaeology of Lincolnshire. Over the same period the former FLARE (which joined with SLHA in 2009) published or promoted an impressive series of monographs on the archaeology of Lincoln. Publications from both organisations are listed below.

Authors are invited to submit completed manuscripts or outlines of appropriate books for consideration by the Society.

Click for details --- Treading the Boards -
Actors and Theatres in Georgian Lincolnshire
Treading the Boards - Actors and Theatres in Georgian Lincolnshire
Books Published by SLHA
Treading the Boards - Actors and Theatres in Georgian Lincolnshire

Neil R Wright
SLHA 2016
276pp paperback
ISBN 978 0 903582 55 1
£16.50 (£19.50 by post UK)
Price to SLHA members £13.20 (£16.20 by post UK)

There was a golden age of theatres and acting in Lincolnshire between 1730 and 1850. This book, the first to cover the topic, tells the hidden story of drama in the county and adjacent towns during the rollicking Georgian era. It shows how theatre flourished and actors made a living in Lincolnshire without needing to go elsewhere. It describes their lives, their successes and failures, the pleasures and hardships of a life on the circuit.

In this period Lincolnshire and neighbouring counties had more theatres than at any time before or since. Robertson’s main company, one of the largest, was based in Lincoln and travelled round the county bringing the excitement of live theatre to local towns as well as Newark, Peterborough and other places close by. Smaller towns were also visited by other companies. They made a great impact on their audiences, and the best actors went on to star in London and America.
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Neil Wright is a long standing member of SLHA and author of many books and articles on aspects of the history of Lincolnshire, including "Lincolnshire Towns and Industry 1700-1914” and editor of the prize-winning "Lincolnshire’s Industrial Heritage – A Guide”.

 

Neil R Wright
Foreword by Jim Broadbent
Click for details --- The Caistor Canal
The Caistor Canal
Books Published by SLHA
The Caistor Canal

Christopher Padley
SLHA 2015
First published in Lincolnshire History and Archaeology, Volume 44, 2009
Reprinted with revisions and additional illustrations
60pp paperback A5
ISBN 978 0 903582 54 4
£5.00 (£6.75 by post UK)
Price to SLHA members £4.00 (£5.75 by post UK)

In the late eighteenth century Caistor, like other Lincolnshire towns, needed a canal to link it to a wider world of trade and business.  In due course a 4-mile stretch of canal was built eastwards from the Ancholme as far as Moortown, barely halfway to Caistor. For the next 80 years coal and other essential goods were brought in and local produce, especially corn was taken to distant markets.

The line of Caistor Canal can still be traced today and several locks survive (mainly on private land). However, records of the canal’s construction and operation are scanty and this account brings together all known sources and adds previously unpublished information.

Chris Padley has had an interest in Caistor Canal for over 50 years.  He is a member of the Industrial Archaeology team at SLHA.


 

Christopher Padley
Click for details --- Effluence and Influence: Public Health, Sewers and Politics in Lincoln, 1848-50
Effluence and Influence: Public Health, Sewers and Politics in Lincoln, 1848-50
Books Published by SLHA
Effluence and Influence: Public Health, Sewers and Politics in Lincoln, 1848-50

Dennis R Mills
SLHA 2015
167pp paperback A4
ISBN 978 0 903582 53 7
£12.50 (£15.50 by post UK)
Price to SLHA members £10.00 (£13.00 by post UK)

Cholera threatened Lincoln during the national epidemic of 1848-49.  The book reproduces the street by street report by George Giles, an eminent engineer, on the insanitary condition of the city, as well as his state-of-the art sewerage scheme described in both text and maps.  A lively debate ensued in the City but at two rowdy public meetings ratepayers succeeded in defeating the adoption of the proposals.

The author places the local story and characters within the wider debates about public health, urban development and changes in sewer technology, and provides biographical notes on the Lincoln men involved.

Dr Dennis Mills is a highly regarded historical geographer who was educated in Lincoln and is a longstanding member of SLHA.  He is well known for his accessible books and articles on Lincoln and neighbourhood, including Historic Town Plans of Lincoln, 1610-1920 (edited jointly with Dr Rob Wheeler, published by Lincoln Record Society in 2004). 

REVIEW

Review 1: Richard Oliver in Sheetlines 105, April 2016, (journal of the Charles Close Society for the Study of the OS)

Dennis Mills' 'Effluence and Influence: Public Health, Sewers and Politics in Lincoln', 1848-50 is strongly commended as an example to be emulated.

Thanks to the work of Brian Harley and others, the public health mapping of the mid-nineteenth century is much better known than it was at the inception of CCS in 1980, but the large scales employed — usually 1:528 — has militated against much of this mapping being issued in any form.

Some of this work was undertaken by the OS, and their 1:528 survey of Warwick was issued in monochrome half-tone at a reduced scale in 1978, which was better than nothing, though not much more can be said.

'Effluence and Influence' is a step forward. In 1848 Lincoln was threatened with cholera; in September 1849 George Giles made a comprehensive report on the sewerage of the city, and prepared plans at both 1:1584 and 1:3168. Reproduced here are the report, and the 1:3168 plan, in A4 sections, with some additional names supplied, and there is a comprehensive account of the report's background.

It may be objected that the map is not entirely original, and owes much to James Sandby Padley's map at the same scale that had been published in 1842 and was reissued in 2004, but Giles betters Padley both by including contours — mostly at 10 feet intervals, which is better than anything OS has offered — and by showing his sewerage scheme, which embraced both existing sewers and new construction.

Similar atlases of towns with OS 1:528 mapping would be welcome.

Review 2: Jamie Margetts, Technical Director, RPS Water, Derby in Lincolnshire Past & Present No.105, Autumn 2016

All Water Companies in the UK are required to map and understand how their urban drainage systems perform. These ‘Drainage Area Plans’ are refreshed every few years to plan future investment strategies to deal with population growth and climate change, and to confirm what impact these will have on the customer through improving flooding or river water quality, and ultimately the bills that they pay.

As a modern day urban drainage engineer, I was amazed at the similarities with the work and challenges we face today and those described in Victorian Lincoln in readiness for its first major sewerage project. There are many parallels and relevant lessons to be learnt from George Giles' work, excellently narrated by Dennis Mills, and Giles’ ultimately unsuccessful attempt to drive through such major public health investment.

This well researched book describes in detail the formulation of Lincoln’s own first Drainage Area Plan, and the proposals of George Giles, as he and his contemporaries understood and quantified, first the public health benefits of an organised sewerage scheme, and then the technicalities of surface water and domestic drainage, hydrologic and hydraulic processes. The well-articulated benefits of his proposed sewerage scheme, the understanding of deficiencies and negative impacts on the population, and the detailed mapping of a proposed new sewerage system mirror studies completed today, albeit in a very different setting.

The book describes how George Giles developed these extensive proposals without the modern day luxuries of computer modelling, monitoring, detailed mapping and GPS surveying, relying on his own observations and training as a Victorian civil engineer in what was a rapidly advancing and innovative field at the time.

In further parallels to today the book outlines the controversies and challenges in adopting Giles’ sewerage proposals, including high costs, disagreements about the benefits delivered, the impact on chargeable rates for the poorest customers, competing priorities for public funding, and differing views across civic and business stakeholders.

The book gives a good feel of the atmosphere at the time, caused by the arguments across the community and classes, and culminating in rowdy public meetings to decide whether to adopt the town-wide scheme. Over 150 years later, we have still not managed to square this circle, with large public infrastructure schemes still causing lively debate and emotion around cost and benefit.

Despite some confusing figure referencing, the author has produced an excellent piece combining the histories of public health, sewerage technical understanding, and the local political conflicts that ultimately mothballed Giles’ excellent work. The level of detail in the mapping of the town and its sewer system is second to none for the time, and may still contain nuggets of golden information to help modern drainage engineers.

The contemporary discussion of public health and why sewerage is important is enlightening; particularly to modern day practitioners who, due to the lack of cholera, typhoid and typhus, can be forgiven for occasionally forgetting exactly why they design sewers. Our focus today is on preventing flooding of homes and improving river or bathing water quality; Giles’ requirements resulted in a similar solution, but could be considered more pressing in terms of saving lives!

In navigating these different aspects, the author has constructed a narrative that will interest a wide range of readers. The dominant figures of Victorian Lincoln, where they lived and their roles in society at the time are given as much attention as the nuances of egg or oval shaped sewer design that will fascinate any engineer.

The hydrology of surface water runoff and its interaction with Lincoln's underlying geology and river systems will be of interest to today’s hydraulic modelling community, but is also presented in a way to make it interesting and understandable to the lay person. This is a key aspect of the book, given the interaction of geographical and socio-economic factors affecting the public health position at the time, and the ultimate reasons for Giles’ proposal.

The use of figures, plans and maps throughout brings the book alive, providing not just a local context, but a welcome break from Giles’ original technical reports. The author has edited these to make them more readable to today’s reader, but maintained the Victorian atmosphere and sense of formality. The detailed, colourful and well explained sewerage mapping with its colour coded sewers and dimensions will interest not only drainage engineers and map historians, but anyone involved in Lincoln’s history given the level of information these contain on the layout of the town.

Following the technical proposals, the book outlines the controversies of the day around the attempts to adopt Giles’ proposals. The sense of challenge, anger and frustration by those involved comes through adding an exciting narrative to the engineer’s straightforward commentary about his proposed works.

Finally, the author also gives a nod to life after Giles’ proposals were abandoned, and how ultimately the Victorian desire to deliver long lasting improvements to public health and life expectancy became common place, often at great expense. Maybe there is a lesson here for today’s readers and decision makers as we deal with the challenge of needing similar large scale investment and innovation to mitigate our future problems of population growth, ageing infrastructure and, of course, climate change. Hopefully, for the sake of future generations, we make the right choices.

Dennis R Mills
Click for details --- Artur Immanuel Loewental
Artur Immanuel Loewental
Books Published by SLHA
Artur Immanuel Loewental

John T Turner
SLHA 2014
119pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 50 6
Paperback A4
£15.95 (£18.80 by post UK; £26.60 by post overseas)

Price to SLHA members £12.75 (£15.60 by post UK)

Artur Immanuel Loewental (1879-1964) was a sculptor of rare talent who created medals of eminent people in Austria, Germany and Britain. Well known for his series of World War I German commemorative medals, his other subjects included Beethoven, Einstein and Kreisler.

Moving to Britain in 1934 – he was an Austrian Jew – his modelling skills with various materials continued to be in demand. The medals he sculpted of Kipling and Churchill achieved great acclaim.

For the last twenty years of his life he lived in or near Lincoln and large collections of his work are in either public or private hands in Lincolnshire today.

This study tells the story of a remarkable man and, for the first time, provides a detailed illustrated catalogue of the medals he sculpted.

 

John T Turner
Click for details --- Grantham: An Industrial Heritage Trail
Grantham: An Industrial Heritage Trail
Books Published by SLHA
Grantham: An Industrial Heritage Trail

Written by Peter Stevenson, with maps by Ken Redmore
SLHA 2014 (Reprint)
28pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 29 2
Paperback A5
£3.50 (£5.25 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members £2.80 (£4.55 by post UK)

Grantham has a rich industrial past - from malting and brewing to machine making and engineering. Richard Hornsby took the name of the town across the world and many other companies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries added to Grantham's prosperity and importance.

Much of the town's industrial past has been swept away by modern development but this street by street guide identifies the many buildings and structures which remain, and brings the reader face to face with Grantham's impressive industrial heritage.

Peter Stevenson
Click for details --- Windmills in Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire
Windmills in Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire
Books Published by SLHA
Windmills in Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire

Joyce M Curtis
Edited by Hilary Healey
SLHA 2014
43pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 49 0
Paperback
£7.95 (£9.70 by post UK)
Price to SLHA members £6.35 (£8.15 by post UK)

Pinchbeck, a large fenland parish, had an unusual number of mills - no fewer than five survived into the twentieth century.  Today there is barely anything to be seen of these important village landmarks, but this well-illustrated study discloses a rich past of mill building in the parish.  There are accounts too of the men who invested in windmills and the generations of millers who worked them.

Joyce M Curtis
Click for details --- The First World War Memorials of Lincolnshire
The First World War Memorials of Lincolnshire
Books Published by SLHA
The First World War Memorials of Lincolnshire

Michael Credland
SLHA, 2014
ISBN 978 0 903582 48 3
A4 Paperback, 258pp
£16.95 (£22.95 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members £13.50 (£19.50 by post UK)

The First World War Memorials of Lincolnshire provides a comprehensive gazetteer of the 295 external WW1 memorials in the historic county of Lincolnshire (it excludes memorials and tablets located within buildings). For each War Memorial the author gives the location and a description of the memorial along with its own particular story of how it was designed, funded, erected and unveiled. Each memorial is illustrated, many with historic photographs of the dedication and unveiling. The book includes a comprehensive register of all the names that appear on the memorials including those of the Second World War and later conflicts where these have been added to a Great War memorial. This is the first book to cover comprehensively Lincolnshire's commemoration of the Great War.

Michael Credland is an authority on the First World War and in particular on the role of the Lincolnshire Regiment in the conflict. He has campaigned for the restoration of several Lincolnshire war memorials and he designed the memorial to the Lincolnshire Regiment at Sobraon Barracks, Lincoln, and also a memorial near Loos, France, commemorating the battle for the Hohenzollern Redoubt in which regiments from the East Midlands played a major role. He has studied Lincolnshire's War Memorials for over three decades and brings his research and expertise together in this publication.

REVIEW

REVIEW in 'This England' magazine, Winter 2014

Commemorative monuments abound in our land and The First World War Memorials of Lincolnshire by Michael Credland is an excellent illustrated portrayal of what one can find in one corner of the UK.

Michael Credland
Click for details --- Lincolnshire's Farm Animals
Lincolnshire's Farm Animals
Books Published by SLHA
Lincolnshire's Farm Animals

Catherine Wilson with Sue & Alan Stennett

SLHA 2012
64pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 46 9
Paperback
£8.95 (£11.05 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: £7.15 (£9.25 by post UK)

The development of Lincolnshire's distinctive farm animal breeds - Lincoln Longwool sheep, Lincoln Red cattle, Lincolnshire Curly Coat pigs, Lincolnshire Buff poultry and the Shire horse - are traced from the earliest times to the present day. In the years around 1900 all the county's livestock breeds were recognised nationally for their quality and were being sold in quantity to markets around the world.

This well researched and superbly illustrated book also shows how, from a low point in the 1960s and 1970s, work by a few dedicated individuals, enlightened marketing and better promotion through shows and breed societies have ensured that there is a future for these special animals.

REVIEW

Review in Heavy Horse World, Winter 2012

The Shire breed merits its own chapter in a new book focusing on the farm livestock of Lincolnshire.

The book was launched at Heckington Show and has been published by the Society for Lincolnshire History & Archaeology and the Heckington & District Agricultural Society. With a foreword by farmer and broadcaster Adam Henson and written by a former director of the Museum of Lincolnshire Life, Catherine Wilson OBE (with Sue and Alan Stennett) its aim is to celebrate the very considerable part played by the county in the development of nearly all types of farm livestock.

All over the British Isles there are local breeds of domesticated livestock, says Catherine Wilson, such as the 'Suffolk Trinity' of the Suffolk Punch horse, Red Poll cattle and Suffolk sheep. "But Lincolnshire can do better than that," she adds. "Lincolnshire is the only county in the country to have its own native breeds of sheep, cattle, pigs and poultry, and to be able to claim a large part in the development of the best known heavy horse, the Shire".

Whole books have been devoted to the story of individual livestock breeds, but there is no summary of the history of the Lincolnshire breeds together - this book aims to fill the gap. Catherine Wilson, a great supporter of heavy horses and a regular visitor to the National Shire Horse Show, explores the historical background of the development of the Lincolnshire breeds before devoting chapters to the Lincoln Longwool sheep, Lincoln Red cattle, Lincolnshire Curly Coat pigs, Ijncolnshire Buff poultry, and the Shire horse.

Beautifully written and well illustrated with colour and black and white photographs, the 64-page book would be of great interest not just to Lincolnshire farmers and country folk, but to devotees everywhere of the history of farm livestock and of course the Shire.


 

Catherine Wilson
Click for details --- Growing Better: Lincolnshire and the Potato
Growing Better: Lincolnshire and the Potato
Books Published by SLHA
Growing Better: Lincolnshire and the Potato
Stewart Squires and Catherine Wilson

SLHA 2011
136pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 44 5
Paperback
£15.00 (£17.10 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: £12.00 (£14.10 by post UK)

This book, with its well-researched contributions from a variety of authors, traces the story of people, past and present, who have helped to make Lincolnshire the premier potato county.

From soil types through machinery development to storage and marketing the book describes the story of the innovation, enterprise and sheer hard work that went into growing potatoes from the mid-nineteenth century and which continues to the present day.

There are over 150 illustrations, mostly in colour.

REVIEW

This edited account provides an informative critique of potato production in Lincolnshire, a county which was historically famed for growing the most and best main crops. The wide-ranging account covers not only the history of the potato and the Lincolnshire dialect, but also the transformation of almost all aspects potato-growing, from planting to harvesting and storage, as well as the marketing, processing and retailing of potatoes in a multitude of guises.

The text, a significant part of which has been written by the editors, is complemented by pertinent contributions from leading experts in the historical development of the county and those with specialist knowledge of particular aspects of potato production.

Dennis Mills provides a historical evaluation of the 'Great Potato Boom', when new varieties were developed while, for example, Peter Dewey's 'Mechanisation and Lincolnshire Manufacturers' gives a detailed critique of the contribution of local machinery companies to transforming production.

Abigail Hunt's chapter offers an excellent insight into the mobilisation of different sources of labour to harvest the crop, and Stewart Squires provides an illuminating account of the role which Lincolnshire played in the popularising of fish and chips. The final chapter contains an extensive list of recipes illustrating various ways of cooking potatoes.

There is considerable variability and inconsistency between the different chapters, not only in terms of their length but also quality of the analysis. Some concentrate on reviewing particular aspects of the story, with a limited focus, and few references to the sources are used. There are also a small number of factual errors.

It would be inappropriate to judge the quality of the text by strictly academic conventions. Instead, evaluating it in terms of its relevance and appeal to a more general audience reveals its considerable merits. A multitude of interesting and relevant issues are covered in relation to virtually all aspects of the potato in Lincolnshire.

There is an impressive collection of photographs, diagrams and illustrations and the book provides a perceptive critique which will appeal to those interested in the history of Britain's most important source of food, as well as those interested in the history of Lincolnshire.

S Squires and C Wilson
Click for details --- Lincoln Connections
Lincoln Connections
Books Published by SLHA
Lincoln Connections

Aspects of City and County since 1700

S Brook, A Walker and R Wheeler

SLHA 2011
143pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 42 1
Paperback
Now reduced in Price
£9.95 (£12.80 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: £7.95 (£10.80 by post UK)

A tribute to Dr Dennis Mills on his 80th birthday. Nine academic colleagues and friends have written contributions which relate to Lincoln and area and cover themes known to be of interest to Dr Mills.

Brook, Walker and Wheeler
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- Building a Railway: Bourne to Saxby
Building a Railway: Bourne to Saxby
Books Published by SLHA
Building a Railway: Bourne to Saxby

Winner of National Award
Association for Industrial Archaeology: Best Occasional Publication 2009

Stewart Squires and Ken Hollamby

Lincoln Record Society & SLHA 2009
151pp
ISBN 978 0 9015038 62
Large format hardback
£30.00 (£37.00 by post UK)

High quality photographs taken by the engineer working on this railway line's construction in the 1890s are juxtaposed with colour photographs from the same viewpoints today.

Expert text and other material related to the construction of the line contribute to an exceptionally vivid and informative book.

REVIEW

See review in The Railway Magazine, Book of the Month, April 2010

Review by Joe Greaves (on Amazon website, 10.10.09)

The new benchmark for railway books, and much more.

Many railway books these days are little more than a collection of black and white photographs with spartan captions, no index and relatively cheap production. They fulfil their purpose but you don't buy them to read, merely to look at the pictures occasionally and put away on the shelf again.

'Building a Railway - Bourne to Saxby' is different. I can imagine some people being put off by the price, after all, you could buy several books for the cover price of this one, but I guarantee you it is worth every penny. It is a magnificent, sumptuous work. This is not just a railway book in the conventional sense either. The photographs were taken by Charles Stansfield Wilson, a keen amateur photographer and the Resident Engineer responsible for the construction of the railway line from Bourne in Lincolnshire to Saxby Junction in Leicestershire during 1890 - 1893.

Fearing that they had started to deteriorate and keen to see them preserved and brought to a wider audience, with great foresight, the husband of his great-granddaughter offered the family collection of photographs to the Lincoln Record Society (LRS) in 2007.

Their initial idea was to produce a booklet using them, but it became clear that the subject matter, the construction of a railway line in the late Victorian era, was so rare that they deserved much more.

The LRS and The Society for Lincolnshire History and Archaeology decided that a large hardback book was a much more suitable way to present this material, and the result is one of the finest railway books, in fact finest books I have ever seen.

It is beautifully made, laid out in such a way that each photograph has the space it needs to be properly appreciated and with detailed descriptions interpreting what is actually shown in the pictures. Each of the photographs, around the size of an A5 sheet, is accompanied by a colour photo taken in 2008 or 2009 of the same location, along with maps and original drawings from the construction work. There is also a comprehensive nine page index. How many railway books have that?

The photographs are of national historical importance as there were very few taken of any railway construction in the Victorian period. Only those of Frank Sutcliffe of Whitby, recording the line from Whitby to Loftus in 1875 - 81, and S W A Newton on the Great Central Main Line from 1894, both professional photographers, are comparable.

The authors spent months painstakingly identifying the location of each photo along the 16 mile route and it is fascinating to see how much of what was there in 1890-93 has survived. Even a specific tree in one picture, although amazingly it was blown down in a gale just a few weeks after they took the modern photograph of it.

The latter part of the book is a completely re-set and re-printed version of John Rhodes' 52 page A5 sized 1989 paperback book 'Bourne to Saxby' (ISBN 0-948017-07-4) which gives the history of this part of the Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway from the construction until it closed in 1959.

But this is not just a book for railway enthusiasts, in fact there are hardly any locomotives to be seen (just the Manning Wardle 0-4-0s used by the contractor).

For M&GN enthusiasts, here is a book with over 70 photographs you have certainly never seen before, and from the dawn of the line. There is even a picture of all the Midland and the Great Northern directors at Saxby Station during their inspection visit in April 1893. This was the section of line that finally connected the M&GN to the 'outside world' and opened the way for the famous 'Leicesters' and the exploitation by the company of the holiday potential of the Norfolk coast.

Any other enthusiast of Victorian railways will also find it fascinating, especially those who prefer the infrastructure to the 10,000th picture of '4472 at Grantham' (and yes, I know 4472 isn't a Victorian loco!)

For family historians, the construction work was being undertaken during the 1891 Census, so you may be able to spot a relative in one of the pictures (unlikely, I'll admit, but possible) and I believe there may be more to come from the authors on this subject in future. Have a day out this weekend and see the bridge your great-grandfather built.

For students of photographic history, here is the best, in fact possibly only, collection of amateur photographs (remember Mr Wilson was a full time engineer but only an amateur photographer) of a railway being built in England during the Victorian era.

And for people who appreciate a beautifully produced book, I cannot recommend this volume too highly. My only fear is that relatively few will discover it before it goes out of print.

If a better railway book is produced this year, I will be amazed. As I said in my title to this review, this is the new benchmark for the genre. I would advise that you buy yours now while you have the opportunity.

 

S Squires and K Hollamby
Click for details --- Sutton Bridge - An Industrial History
Sutton Bridge - An Industrial History
Books Published by SLHA
Sutton Bridge - An Industrial History
Neil Wright and Beryl Jackson

SLHA 2009
49pp
978 0 903582 37 7
Paperback

Now reduced to £5.95 (£7.45 by post)

Price to SLHA members: £4.75 (£6.25 by post UK)

About the bridge that gave the village its name and also about the settlement and port that grew up next to the bridge, the main road and railway that linked Norfolk to the lands to the west, the surprisingly short-lived dock, and the long-vanished RAF base in Wingland.

An enlarged and revised edition - now extensively illustrated - of the earlier publication
N Wright and B Jackson
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- Tennyson Poems in Lincolnshire Dialect
Tennyson Poems in Lincolnshire Dialect
Books Published by SLHA
Tennyson Poems in Lincolnshire Dialect
Edward Campion and Edith Burgess

SLHA and Cantoris Records 2009
5051078 915227
CD (61m 41s)

Now reduced to £4.95 (£6.70 by post)

Price to SLHA members: £3.95 (£6.50 by post UK)

A re-issue of recordings, originally on 3 LPs, produced by the Lincolnshire Association in collaboration with the Tennyson Society in 1969. The sound had been remastered digitally. A FULL TRANSCRIPT of the poems is included.
REVIEW
Tennyson poems in Lincolnshire Dialect

Review by Ray Carroll for Lincolnshire Past & Present, 2009-10

The disc produced by SLHA is a welcome reissue of recordings by noted readers of the county's dialect poetry made 40 years ago and long unavailable.

It is doubly valuable as it conserves knowledge of how Lincolnshire natives spoke in times past. The poems are, of course, masterly of their type: they were all written in the last years of Tennyson's life long after he left the county; but he clearly had an enormous recall of his native speech and its rhythms, used here to great humorous effect.
Campion & Burgess
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- Papermaking in Lincolnshire 1600-1900
Papermaking in Lincolnshire 1600-1900
Books Published by SLHA
Papermaking in Lincolnshire 1600-1900
Hugh Nott

SLHA 2008
63pp
978 0 903582 33 9
Paperback

Now further reduced to £4.95 (£7.05 by post)

Price to SLHA members: £3.95 (£6.05 by post)

Examines all known papermaking sites in Lincolnshire and comments in detail on the families of papermakers. Includes site plans, photographs, watermarks and other documents not previously published.
REVIEW
1. Review by Ray Carroll, Lincolnshire Past & Present, 2008

This is a first-class piece of research. It has taken the author many years of digging in archives, touring the various sites where papermaking took place, studying old maps and delving into family histories.

The standard histories of papermaking spread a wide net over the early origins of the creation of material suitable to take pen and ink and, much later, type and illustrations. Such volumes take a world view that ranges from the Egyptian papyrus and Chinese use of bamboo to the first European factory in Italy in the thirteenth century and the first in England (Hertfordshire, 1495). Such matters are touched on here by way of introduction but the focus is strongly on the local. A long-term resident in Tealby, the author became interested in the village’s paper-making facilities sited on the stream by Papermill Lane. Being in a hilly area with ample supplies of clear running water and access to rags from which handmade paper was made, it became a centre that eventually had three mills in operation. Mr Nott first looks at these mills and has dug out many fascinating details of their origins, working methods and the families associated with them, the latter having a long section of their own.

He then provides similar details of the sites and associated families in Leasingham, West Deeping, Barrow-on-Humber, Louth and Houghton Mill, near Grantham. The earliest reference is to ‘a paperman’ living at Evedon, near Sleaford, in 1617. Each chapter also has its complement of site maps, photographs of any remains, old engravings, documents and family portraits. Well produced on good paper, another facet of the county’s industrial history is admirably covered.

2. Review by David Robinson, Lincolnshire Life, 2008

The earliest record of a paper mill in Lincolnshire was at Leasingham in 1617. The main requirement was a river with enough energy to power a watermill to pulp rags that were the papermakers' raw material. This book incorporates new research identifying seven other sites - three at Tealby (where the author lives and his interest started), and at Louth, Houghton in Grantham, Barrow on Humber and West Deeping. He visited each to trace what remains of the mills and drying sheds; some have completely disappeared but mill buildings remain at Louth and West Deeping.

There is information on the people who worked the low-tech hand-made paper producing mills and how the busineses were run. Even watermarks have been found, which show that good quality white paper was made for printing and writing. Today we take paper for granted but in the seventeenth century it was a rare and expensive commodity.

A section describes the method of papermaking, first developed in China nearly two thousand years ago, and another on the working of the paper mill. Evidence for those in Lincolnshire includes documents from archives not previously published, site plans, watermarks and photographs to demonstrate the extent of the industry in the county. From the 1830s competition from mechanised steam-powered mills elsewhere overwhelmed local producers, some of which converted to corn mills, and the last paper mill to close was at Houghton in 1890.

Hugh Nott
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- Ration Books and Rabbit Pie
Ration Books and Rabbit Pie
Books Published by SLHA
Ration Books and Rabbit Pie

Lincolnshire Folk Remember the War
Linda Crust
SLHA 2008
72pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 31 5
Paperback

Now reduced to £5.95 (£8.05 by post)

Price to SLHA members: £4.75 (£6.85 by post UK)

The distillation of a countywide oral history recording project which contains lively personal accounts of daily life among rural families in Lincolnshire under the extraordinary circumstances of rationing, blackout and compulsory war service.

REVIEW
Ration books and Rabbit Pie: Crust, Linda (Editor)

Review by Ray Carroll for Lincolnshire Past & Present, 2008

The result of a project undertaken by several members of the SLHA, this book brings vividly before us memories of the war at home in the county. Twenty contributors have given their accounts of what impinged most in their youth when faced with bombing, rationing and all sorts of other shortages and deprivations.

Mrs Crust has skilfully woven all these differing voices into sequences, the topics covering|: the start of the war, local activities (airfields, PoWs, bombing), the effects of evacuation, the arrival of WAAFs and Land Army women, ARP, Home Guard units, fire watching and much more.

A short final section concentrates on good times that also kept breaking through. It is all very readable though leaving in the family history in some people’s memories may puzzle readers.

Linda Crust
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1
Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1
Books Published by SLHA
Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1
Terence R Leach and Robert Pacey

SLHA 2008 (reprint of 1990 edition)
36pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 24 7
Paperback £6.00 (£7.75 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: £4.80 (£6.55 by post UK)

Brief histories of the house (and families) of Blankney Hall, Caenby Hall, Cockerington Hall, Denton Manor, Easton Hall, Hagnaby Priory, Haverholme Priory, Kenwick Hall, Langton Hall, Riby Grove, South Elkington Hall, Stourton Hall, Sudbrooke Holme, Syston Hall, Temple Bellwood, Thonock Hall, Uffington House, Walmsgate Hall and Willingham House - with photographs.
T R Leach and R Pacey
Click for details --- Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2
Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2
Books Published by SLHA
Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2
Terence R Leach and Robert Pacey

SLHA 2013 (reprint of 1992 edition)
80pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 28 5,
Paperback £8.95 (£11.05 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: £7.20 (£9.30 by post UK)

Devoted mainly to houses belonging to Anderson, Cracroft-Amcotts and Grantham families. Includes Scremby Hall, St Katherine's Hall (Lincoln), Dunholme Manor, Goltho Hall, Manby Hall (Broughton), Lea Hall, Kettlethorpe Hall, Somerby near Brigg, Hackthorn Old Hall, West Willoughby.
T R Leach and R Pacey
Click for details --- Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 3
Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 3
Books Published by SLHA
Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 3
Terence R Leach and Robert Pacey

SLHA 2008 (reprint of 1992 edition)
56pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 35 3
Paperback £6.75 (£8.85 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: £5.40 (£7.50 by post UK)

Detailed examination of Bayons Manor, Tealby, home of the Tennyson D'Eyncourts. Over 50 illustrations, including photographs, drawings and plans, together with an historical survey and contemporary correspondence.
T R Leach and R Pacey
Click for details --- Lincolnshire Country Houses & Families: Part 1
Lincolnshire Country Houses & Families: Part 1
Books Published by SLHA
Lincolnshire Country Houses & Families: Part 1
Terence R Leach

SLHA

2009 (reprint of 1990)
84pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 36 0
Paperback £9.95 (£12.05 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: £7.95 (£10.05 by post UK)

Houses include Dunton Hall (Tydd St Mary), Edlington Hall, Lobthorpe Hall, Kettleby House, Kyme Tower, Eresby, Cranwell Hall, Sapperton, Scrivelsby Court, Langton Hall, Aswardby Park, Harpswell, Aisthorpe Hall, South Thoresby, Boothby Pagnell, Halstead Hall, Irnham Hall, Sempringham, Knaith, Stainfield Hall, Cammeringham Manor, Reasby Hall, Torksey Castle, South Kelsey Hall, Glentworth Hall, Snarford, Thorpe Hall, Fenton Hall, Bassingthorpe Manor, Ashby Hall (Ashby de la Launde), Marston Hall, Osgodby Hall.

With many illustrations.

 

 

Terence R Leach
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- Lincolnshire Country Houses & Families: Part 2
Lincolnshire Country Houses & Families: Part 2
Books Published by SLHA
Lincolnshire Country Houses & Families: Part 2
Terence R Leach

SLHA
2008 (reprint of 1991)
118pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 34 6
Paperback

Now reduced to £9.95 (£12.80 by post)

Price to SLHA members: £7.95 (£10.80 by post UK)

Houses include Hougham Manor, Doddington Hall, Aubourn Hall, Horkstow Hall, Red Hall (Bourne), Dowsby Hall, Billingborough Hall, Scawby Hall, Brumby Hall, Thorganby Hall, Brocklesby Hall (and the Pelhams), Grimblethorpe Hall, Coleby Hall, Bloxholm Hall, Hagworthingham Old Hall, Hainton Hall (and the Heneages), Kelstern Hall, Folkingham Manor and Nocton Hall.

With many pedigrees and over 100 illustrations.

Terence R Leach
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- All Things Lincolnshire
All Things Lincolnshire
Books Published by SLHA
All Things Lincolnshire
Jean Howard and David Start

SLHA
2007
267 pp
ISBN 978 0 903582 27 8
Paperback

Now reduced to £9.95 (£13.65 by post)

Price to SLHA members: £7.95 (£11.65 by post UK)

A wide range of essays and articles on historical, geographical and wildlife themes, most with a particular Lincolnshire connotation, reflecting the breadth of David Robinson's interests.
REVIEW
All things Lincolnshire: Howard, Jean and Start, David, editors

Review by Robin Brumby, Taunton (Mayor of Louth, 1970-71), 2008

My reaction when asked to review this book was delight, knowing David Robinson and his multifarious involvements with Lincolnshire life; I anticipated many insights about the county where I spent my youth. Anticipated delight became actual when the book arrived. A first look showed that I knew many of the contributors and the list of contents made clear that here was something for everyone. The most striking tribute to David Robinson is that everything is for him. That is the thread that links the articles together. As the editors say: 'This is not a disparate selection, but an acknowledgement of the wide diversity of David’s interests and expertise: most of all they represent his passion for All Things Lincolnshire'. And what a well-chosen title! All here is about Lincolnshire and the whole of Lincolnshire is here; and, if that second claim is somewhat bold, that is surely forgivable.

Delight also in the physical appearance of the book, good both to view and to handle. The typeface is clear and it is well illustrated with photographs, cartoons, pen and ink drawings, diagrams; and I know exactly where the cover painting was made! Unfortunately, pages 171-8 are printed upside down and in reverse order in my copy. Is mine the only rogue copy? Besides the foreword, lists of contributors and subscribers and editorial notes there is a list of David’s own publications.

The contents form two groups – Reflections and Studies. There are 12 of the former which in general provide memories of David and Joyce Robinson but include one poem, one article on Lincolnshire humour, one on Brian Ansell and a carving for Louth Museum, and one by Joyce Robinson.

The 29 Studies take up 230 pages and form the major group of articles on the county past and present. The worth of the book stands on the quality of these - and triumphantly stands. They vary markedly in length. While six pages are average Linwood Warren: a journey of discovery by Catherine and Peter Wilson takes 30 pages in a detailed exploration of the historical and natural history of this site.

The range of topics is wide: local history, archaeology, geology, landscape and spires, county personalities across the ages, wildlife and The setting of Horncastle College by David himself – and more. Something for everyone’s interests and, for me in particular, articles by Ray Carroll on John Speed’s map of Lincoln, Brian Dawson’s entitled Two songs and a singing game and Roger Norburn’s Jean Ingelow and her poetry. I am sure other readers will find their own favourites.

I end unashamedly with two studies where I have personal links with the material and again, I am sure, other readers will have this experience with some articles. The members of Parliament for Louth by Lord Norton brought back memories of my active part in Labour campaigns, particularly the 1966 election when I was Labour candidate. His account is thorough and interesting in recounting the ebb and flow of support for the major parties since 1885 and the mini biographies of the MPs themselves, weighted to those since 1945. I thought Mrs Wintringham warranted more attention as only the second woman to sit in the House of Commons and thus a more significant figure than the later Tory knights to whom Lord Norton devotes space.

Roger Evans in Grasby in 1873 writes of Charles Turner, Vicar of the village and an incident in which my antecedents could have among the "scoffing rabble”. Roger Evans writes attractively and authoritatively about the event and the issues behind the uproar and suggests links between the happenings and two of the vicar’s sonnets. There are vivid contemporary illustrations. This study is an example of the high quality of the book.

I can recommend this wide-ranging and worthy tribute to Lincolnshire’s own Renaissance man to all interested in all things Lincolnshire. The irony is that probably the only person capable of adequately reviewing such varied riches is David Robinson himself!

J Howard and D Start
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- Lincolnshire on the Move
Lincolnshire on the Move
Books Published by SLHA
Lincolnshire on the Move
Jean Howard and Chris Lester

SLHA 2005
72pp
ISBN 0 903582 22 8
Paperback

Now reduced to £2.95 (£4.70 by post)

Price to SLHA members: £2.35 (£4.10 by post)

Contains chapters on the history and development of Lincolnshire roads, canals, railways, bridges, ports and vehicle manufacture. 
Jean Howard and Chris Lester
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- The Early History of Lincoln Castle
The Early History of Lincoln Castle
Books Published by SLHA
The Early History of Lincoln Castle
Philip Lindley

2004
86pp
ISBN 0 903582 21 X
Paperback

Now reduced to £5.00 (£7.10 by post)

Price to SLHA members: £4.00 (£6.10 by post)

A detailed study of the Castle, with contributions on the early castle, early topography, archaeology, architecture, medieval defences, the Castle's occupants. Many photographs and drawings.
Philip Lindley
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- Lincolnshire's Industrial Heritage - A Guide
Lincolnshire's Industrial Heritage - A Guide
Books Published by SLHA
Lincolnshire's Industrial Heritage - A Guide

 

Winner of National Award
Association for Industrial Archaeology: Best Occasional Publication 2004

Neil Wright

SLHA
2004
A5
105pp
c200 photographs

ISBN 0 903582 20 1

Paperback £4.50 (£6.25 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: £3.60 (£5.35 by post UK)

A comprehensive guide to the county's mills, railways, canals, bridges, factories and other important industrial remains. Over 400 entries - descriptive and historical information plus scores of photographs - arranged in a pocket-sized book. 

Neil Wright
Click for details --- Aircraft Made in Lincoln
Aircraft Made in Lincoln
Books Published by SLHA
Aircraft Made in Lincoln
J Walls and C Parker

2000
76pp
139 figs & Illustrations
ISBN 0 903582 16 3

Paperback £4.95 (£6.70 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: £3.95 (£5.70 by post UK)

During WWI Lincoln became one of the largest aircraft production centres in the world. This book, with the aid of many previously unpublished photographs, describes the work of four city engineering firms.
J Walls and C Parker
Click for details --- Lincolnshire's Archaeology From the Air
Lincolnshire's Archaeology From the Air
Books Published by SLHA
Lincolnshire's Archaeology From the Air
R H Bewley

SLHA
1998
106pp + maps & photos;
ISBN 0903582 11 2
A4, card covers, £4.95 (£7.80 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: £3.95 (£6.80 by post UK)

A collection of articles illustrating the variety of air photo information already available about Lincolnshire - and how this relates to other archaeological techniques.
R H Bewley
Click for details --- The Logic of Open Field Systems
The Logic of Open Field Systems
Books Published by SLHA
The Logic of Open Field Systems
R C Russell

Revised 1995
(First published by NCXVO, 1974)
24pp
20 maps
ISBN 0 903582 04 X

A4, Card covers £1.00 (£2.75 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: 80p (£2.55 by post UK)

Describes the open field system at the time of enclosure in 47 Lincolnshire parishes. 
R C Russell
Click for details --- Excavations at the Romano-British Settlement,Long Bennington
Excavations at the Romano-British Settlement,Long Bennington
Books Published by SLHA
Excavations at the Romano-British Settlement,Long Bennington
H Wheeler and R Leary

SLHA
1994
62pp
30 figs (10 plates)
ISBN 0 903582 03 1
A4

Card covers £2.00 (£4.10 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: £1.60 (£3.70 by post UK)

An account of a ditch complex containing coarse pottery, a brooch and clay sling shots; also a C4 Romanised stone building and an enigmatic timber structure.
Click for details --- Some Historians of Lincolnshire
Some Historians of Lincolnshire
Books Published by SLHA
Some Historians of Lincolnshire
C Sturman

SLHA
1989
92pp
25 figs or plates
ISBN 0 904680 96 3

Paperback £2.00 (£4.85 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: £1.60 (£4.45 by post UK)

Essays based on lectures about the lives and works of Edward Trollope, A R Maddison, T Langley, W O Massingberd, R W Golding, C W Foster, Sir F Stenton, Sir F Hill, E Peacock, A Stark, Sir A Welby.
C Sturman
Click for details --- The Brackenburys of Lincolnshire
The Brackenburys of Lincolnshire
Books Published by SLHA
The Brackenburys of Lincolnshire
C E Brackenbury

1983
25pp
ISBN 0 904680 21 5

Paperback 50p (£2.60 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members: 40p (£2.50 by post UK)

Pre-eminent in this local family was Robert Carr Brackenbury, leading 18th Century Methodist who built the oldest surviving Lincolnshire chapel over his stable at Raithby by Spilsby.
C E Brackenbury
Click for details --- Pre-Viking Lindsey
Pre-Viking Lindsey
Books Published by SLHA
Pre-Viking Lindsey
Alan Vince

1993
156 pages
ISBN 0951498770

£10.00 (£12.10 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members £8.00 (£10.10 by post UK)
Alan Vince
Click for details --- Of Butchers And Breeds
Of Butchers And Breeds
Books Published by SLHA
Of Butchers And Breeds
K Dobney, D Jacques and B Irving

1996
215pp
ISBN 1899641009

£10.00 (£13.90 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members £8.00 (£11.90 by post UK)

Report on vertebrate remains from various sites in the City of Lincoln
Dobney, Jacques and Irving
Click for details --- Clay Tobacco Pipes from Lincoln
Clay Tobacco Pipes from Lincoln
Books Published by SLHA
Clay Tobacco Pipes from Lincoln
J E Mann

1977
60pp
A4
Paperback
No ISBN

Now reduced to £1.00 (£3.00 by post)

Price to SLHA members £0.80 (£2.80 by post UK)
J E Mann
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- A Group of Late Roman Pottery from Lincoln
A Group of Late Roman Pottery from Lincoln
Books Published by SLHA
A Group of Late Roman Pottery from Lincoln
M J Darling

1977
42pp
A4
Paperback
No ISBN

Now reduced to £1.00 (£2.50 by post)

Price to SLHA members £0.80 (£2.30 by post UK)
M J Darling
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- Medieval Pottery from Broadgate East
Medieval Pottery from Broadgate East
Books Published by SLHA
Medieval Pottery from Broadgate East
Lauren Adams Gilmour

1977
54pp
A4
Paperback
No ISBN

Now reduced to £1.00 (£2.50 by post)

Price to SLHA members £0.80 (£2.30 by post UK)
L A Gilmour
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- Lincoln: A Place In Time
Lincoln: A Place In Time
Books Published by SLHA
Lincoln: A Place In Time
David Vale

Flare 1997
72pp
ISBN 090678853

Paperback - now reduced to £3.00 (£5.00 by post)

Price to SLHA members £2.40 (£4.40 by post UK)

About 60 reconstruction drawings of the City of Lincoln based on archaeological and architectural evidence (some in colour), with accompanying text.
David Vale
Now reduced in price
Click for details --- Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings for the School Curriculum
Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings for the School Curriculum
Books Published by SLHA
Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings for the School Curriculum
S Bennett, K Charlesworth with illustrations by T Sutton, D Vale and D Watt

£5.00 (£7.00 by post UK).

Price to SLHA members £4.00 (£6.00 by post UK)

An educational introduction to the City’s history and archaeology, with suggestions for activities designed to help children grasp essential concepts. Published 2000. 92 pages.
S Bennett and K Charlesworth
Click for details --- Interpretation of Stratigraphy: A Review of the Art
Interpretation of Stratigraphy: A Review of the Art
Books Published by SLHA
Interpretation of Stratigraphy: A Review of the Art
Kate Steane

1992
42 pp
£2.00 (£3.50 by post UK)

Price to SLHA members £1.60 (£3.10 by post UK)

Proceedings of a conference held in June 1992 at Lincoln.
Kate Steane