Months with Events
About Events

Events are open to all and prior booking is not necessary except where indicated.

Details of all events are obtainable from SLHA.


Speakers Offered

Names and contact details of speakers are available from the SLHA Office.

Speakers Wanted
Additions to our database of speakers are welcomed - please let us have details of topics, contact information and fees.

 

Events Calendar

January

January 2021
MTWTFSS
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
SLHA Events are now being arranged for 2021
Friday 01 January, 2021
Until it is possible to meet, lectures will be delivered by 'Zoom'
The East Indies comes to Lincolnshire: the Story of Maidenwell Manor

SLHA Archaeology Talk by Zoom 

Presented by Naomi Field, Senior Archaeological Consultant, Prospect Archaeology Ltd, Lincoln.

Bookings are through Eventbrite.

This talk is FREE. To book a place, please click on the link below and in due course you will receive the zoom details https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-east-indies-comes-to-lincolnshire-the-story-of-maidenwell-manor-tickets-135854718119

Please note: Bookings close at 16.00 hours on Saturday 30th January or when fully booked
Sunday 31 January, 2021
2.30pm
ZOOM: On-line lecture open to all

Naomi Field, Senior Archaeological Consultant, Prospect Archaeology Ltd, Lincoln.

What connection does a tiny hamlet in the Lincolnshire Wolds have with an Elizabethan buccaneer, the Skinners Livery Company of London and Basingstoke Corporation?  In 2019 a planning application was made for the demolition of the old farmhouse at Maidenwell and its replacement with a new one. A programme of documentary research, combined with archaeological and historic building investigations has  thrown light on the history of Maidenwell Manor and its farm.   

February

February 2021
MTWTFSS
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
The Art Historian and the Chapter Clerk

Evening talk by Zoom - The Art Historian and the Chapter Clerk: the joys and sorrows of Ecclesiastical documentary evidence

Presented by Dr Lesley Milner

Bookings are through Eventbrite.

This talk is FREE. To book a place, please click on the link below and in due course you will receive the zoom details https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-art-historian-and-the-chapter-clerk-tickets-136420327873

Please note: Bookings close at 16.00 hours on Tuesday 9th February or when fully booked

Wednesday 10 February, 2021
7.30pm
ZOOM: On-line lecture open to all

Documents relating to cathedrals and churches are of immense value and are relatively scarce compared with the written evidence available to historians of other periods. During the period of study for my PhD thesis Secret spaces: English sacristies, vestries and treasure rooms, 1066-1300 I became aware of the potential of the rich field of sources housed in the Lincolnshire Archives, St Rumbold Street, Lincoln, LN2 5AB. These are the Chapter Act Books of Lincoln cathedral beginning in 1306 and the Accounts of the Common Fund, beginning in 1304.

This paper will consist of three parts. The first will show how the recorded minutes of a chapter meeting held in 1324 provided proof of the original function of the cathedral’s thirteenth century annex (known as the Song School). The second will show how the same minutes raise questions about the date of St Hugh’s golden shrine. The third part will examine puzzling evidence about the Great Seal of the dean and chapter contained within an early fourteenth-century annual account of chapter expenditure and will discuss the twelfth-century matrix in terms of its replication into seals during the pre-Reformation period, together with its conservation and preservation during that period.

Dr Lesley Milner is an art and architectural historian specializing in the medieval period.

Joseph Banks - From Agrarian to Industrialist

Evening talk by Zoom

Presented by Paul Scott, Joseph Banks Society

Bookings are through Eventbrite. 

Admission £3.00. To book a place, please click on the link below and in due course you will receive the zoom details https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/joseph-banks-from-agrarian-to-industrialist-tickets-139105611629 

Please note ticket sales will close on 24th February at 12.00 noon 

Wednesday 24 February, 2021
7.30pm
ZOOM: On-line lecture open to all
It is well known that Joseph Banks became famous after accompanying Captain James Cook on the voyage to Tahiti, New Zealand and Australia on board HMS Endeavour, from 1768 to 1771. His contributions in the field of botany and in establishing the collections at Kew Gardens are also well documented, as is his influence on the creation of Australia as a British colony. However, Banks’ contribution to manufacturing and industry are overlooked, although in many ways they are as exciting as his three-year voyage in mainly uncharted waters. This talk explores the significant contribution made by Joseph Banks to the beginning of the Industrial age.

March

March 2021
MTWTFSS
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031    
Britons and Anglo-Saxons in post-Roman Lincolnshire
Evening talk by Zoom - Britons and Anglo-Saxons in post-Roman Lincolnshire: Recent research and new perspectives
 
Presented by Dr Caitlin R Green FSA
 
Bookings are through Eventbrite - Admission £3.00. To book a place, please click on the link below and in due course you will receive the zoom details https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/britons-and-anglo-saxons-in-post-roman-lincolnshire-ad-400-650-tickets-142357612451

Please note bookings will close at 16.00 hours on 9th March
Wednesday 10 March, 2021
7.30pm
ZOOM: On-line lecture open to all

This talk considers a range of recent research on post-Roman Lincolnshire, covering topics such as Romano-British pottery in the fifth and sixth centuries, new finds and interpretations of post-Roman 'British' metalwork in the Lincoln region, place-names evidence for Anglo-Saxon pagan priests, and territories, central clusters & persistent places in the pre-Viking Lincolnshire landscape.

 

British post-Roman silver pennanular brooch terminal. Image courtesy of Kevin Leahy

Churches and Chapels in Victorian Grantham
Evening talk by Zoom
 
Presented by Dr John Manterfield
 
Admission £3.00. Please click on the link below to book a place and the link will be sent to you in due course. https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/churches-and-chapels-in-victorian-grantham-tickets-138947942035
 
Please note that bookings will close at 12.00 noon on Wednesday 31st March 

Wednesday 31 March, 2021
7.30pm
ZOOM: On-line lecture open to all
On 30 March 1851, 3227 people attended morning worship in Grantham. This was 30% of the population. More attended afternoon and evening services at St Wulfram's church, Methodist and other non-conformist and Roman Catholic churches and chapels. Throughout the Victorian era, religious worship was an important part of daily life and the building of new places of worship has left a legacy today. St Wulfram's itself was 'restored' by George Gilbert Scott between 1863 and 1870. 
 
How typical was the experience of Grantham in relation to other towns and communities within our county?


April

April 2021
MTWTFSS
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  
Time Travel for the Armchair Archaeologist - Toynton, Lincs in 1614
Evening Talk by Zoom - Time Travel for the Armchair Archaeologist - A Visit to Toynton, Lincs in 1614

Presented by Jenne Pape
                 
Bookings are through Eventbrite. Admission £3.00. To book a place, please click on the link below and in due course you will receive the zoom details https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/time-travel-for-the-armchair-archaeologist-a-visit-to-toynton-in-1614-tickets-143997818351
 
Please note that bookings will close at 16.00 on Tuesday 13th April at 1600 hours.

Wednesday 14 April, 2021
7.30pm

Fieldwork feels a distant memory – especially buildings archaeology, in people’s homes.  But there is plenty we can do without leaving the comfort of our own sofa; armchair adventures which expand our knowledge and understanding.

Join Jenne for a time travelling visit to Toynton All Saints and St Peter, in the Lincolnshire countryside, as we explore the village in 1614.  King James is on the throne, the Gunpowder Plot is a vivid memory, and a group of religious radicals from Gainsborough will cross the Atlantic in a few years’ time.  But what is going on in a rural place like Toynton?  And how can we connect with the past from our living rooms, when we can’t get out and about? 

We will explore some of the online resources which are available to everyone for free, and learn just how much can be discovered without leaving the house!

 

Cottage in Toynton All Saints

Toynton All Saints from the Air

The 1217 Charter of the Forest and medieval Forest Law
Evening talk by Zoom

Presented by Dr Erik Grigg, Lecturer in History at Bishop Grossetestse University
 
Bookings are through Eventbrite. Admission £3.00. To book a place, please click on the link below and in due course you will receive the zoom details https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-1217-charter-of-the-forest-and-medieval-forest-law-tickets-149661073299

Please note that bookings will close at 12.00 hours on 28th April

Wednesday 28 April, 2021
7.30pm
A talk about medieval Forest Laws, the punishment for breaking the laws and how the Charter of the Forest made the whole system a lot less oppressive. The talk will give a Lincolnshire perspective on Forest Law.

May

May 2021
MTWTFSS
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      
The Fossdyke: Holocene and Historical Evolution of the Lincoln Corridor
Evening talk by Zoom

Presented by Jo Westlake, Lincoln University
 
Bookings are through Eventbrite. Admission £3.00. To book a place, please click on the link below and in due course you will receive the zoom details https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-fossdyke-holocene-and-historical-evolution-of-the-lincoln-corridor-tickets-152125961847
 
Please note that bookings will close at 12.00 hours on 12th May
Wednesday 12 May, 2021
7.30pm
The Fossdyke is the UK’s oldest navigation canal still in operation and is presumed to be Roman, though details of its origin are uncertain. The University of Lincoln research examined the unique landscape for canal building at the time of construction in a corridor between the rivers Trent and Witham. Sediment cores from channels of the ancient River Till were collected and data compared with evidence from satellite imagery, archaeological excavations, and historical information on floods, pools and wetlands along the canal’s route. The aim was to document the evolution of the ‘Lincoln Corridor’ and consider impacts of the findings on ‘re-wilding’ and flood risk in Lincoln.

 

Medieval Spalding and the Fenlands 1050-1550
Evening talk by Zoom 

Presented by Dr Michael Gilbert
 
Bookings are through Eventbrite. Admission £3.00. To book a place, please click on the link below and in due course you will receive the zoom details https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/medieval-spalding-and-the-fenlands-1050-1550-tickets-152146850325
 
Please note that bookings will close at 12.00 hours on 26th May.
Wednesday 26 May, 2021
7.30pm
By the end of the thirteenth century Spalding was a wealthy market town that had grown rich on the wool trade exported through the nearby Hanseatic hub at Boston.
 
Campbell and Bartley in their book on England on the Eve of the Black Death show that in 1330 the Lincolnshire Fens was one of the most prosperous regions in the country only comparable with London and the Cotswolds.
 
The town and its hinterland in Elloe were dominated by the Benedictine Priory who controlled many aspects of public life.
 
This talk looks at how the region was changed by the crisis of the fourteenth century with the power of the church declining and that of the new yeoman/merchant class growing.
 
Michael Gilbert studied at the Centre for English Local History at the University of Leicester with his thesis covering the Changing Landscape and Economy of Wisbech Hundred 1250-1550.
 
This talk builds on that work and on recent research using the archives held by Spalding Gentlemen’s Society.

 

June

June 2021
MTWTFSS
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930    
Keeping our feet dry: A short history of Anglo-Dutch land drainage
Evening talk by Zoom - Keeping our feet dry: A short history of  Anglo-Dutch land drainage through engineering. 
 
Presented by Roger Backhouse 

Bookings are through Eventbrite. Admission £3.00. To book a place, please click on the link below and in due course you will receive the zoom details https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/keeping-our-feet-dry-a-short-history-of-anglo-dutch-drainage-tickets-152151135141 
 
Please note that bookings will close at 12.00 hours on 9th June

Wednesday 09 June, 2021
7.30pm

Roger Backhouse looks at the long history of land drainage by machine including:

  • how the English learned from advanced Dutch technology,
  • what is a polder and how to drain one
  • the biggest cylinder in the world in Europe’s most unusual steam engine
  • why a cast iron post is important
  • what happened to England’s largest lowland lake

The speaker will describe how the landscape was transformed by engineering  and how land drainage is now being rethought in the light of environmental concerns.

Roger Backhouse now lives in York and writes about engineering history and heritage for Model Engineer magazine.

 

Cruquius Engine - Image courtesy of Roger Backhouse

 

Roger Backhouse - Image courtesy of Mike Crisp