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Saltfleet
 
Saltfleet
Saltfleet
Saltfleet

Saltfleet is a small coastal village some eight miles north of Mablethorpe.

This photograph appears to have been taken where the South and North Creeks come together immediately west of the sluice by the A1031 at the southern end of the village.

In the background to the right of the windmill is a terrace of coastguard cottages.

Unposted postcard by Clifford of Nottingham.

Saltfleet,
Saltfleet Mill (1)
Saltfleet Mill (1)
Saltfleet Mill (1)

This tower mill standing on the old sea bank in Mill Lane was built in 1770.

Jon Sass Collection, photograph 1900s

Skidbrooke, Saltfleet Haven windmill, Jon Sass
Saltfleet Mill (2)
Saltfleet Mill (2)
Saltfleet Mill (2)

Saltfleet Mill was last operated in the 1950s and was then converted into a dwelling.

Location of mill: TF 456 936

Peter Kirk Collection, 2002


Skidbrooke, Saltfleet Mill
Saltfleet Mill (3)
Saltfleet Mill (3)
Saltfleet Mill (3)

This small mill was built in the late-eighteenth century. A major rebuild in the 1890s added an extra storey. It continued to work until the early 1950s.

Postcard from David Robinson Collection, undated

Saltfleet, windmill
Saltfleet Mill (4)
Saltfleet Mill (4)
Saltfleet Mill (4)

Some claim this tower windmill dates from 1770, which would make it one of the oldest in the country.

It was renovated and heightened by one storey in 1890s. It operated until 1950s and a photo by Francis Frith, said to date from c.1955, shows it with only two dilapidated sails remaining.

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1165939

and https://catalogue.millsarchive.org/tower-mill-saltfleet

Jean Howard, August 2020 


Saltfleet, windmill
Saltfleet, Haven
Saltfleet, Haven
Saltfleet, Haven

Saltfleet was formerly a significant port but its importance declined as the haven silted up.

In September 1643, a few days before the battle of Winceby, General Fairfax’s troop of horse soldiers is said to have landed at Saltfleet Haven.

The haven is fed by the waters of the Withern Eau and Grayfleet and its present alignment is due to straightening during the Saltfleet New Enclosure in 1854.

Jean Howard, August 2020

Saltfleet, Haven
Saltfleet, Manor House
Saltfleet, Manor House
Saltfleet, Manor House

This is a Grade II listed building of similar date and style to the New Inn opposite.  It must pre-date 1673 as an upstairs window pane is engraved with that date, a lovers’ knot and the names Robert Fox and Jane Hardy.

The house also retains its original wide oak staircase.  A photograph of 19th century red flock wallpaper used here is in the V&A wallpaper collection.

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1063062

and http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O763011/photograph-

Jean Howard, August 2020 unknown/

Saltfleet, Manor House
Saltfleet, Memorial Pump
Saltfleet, Memorial Pump
Saltfleet, Memorial Pump

This village pump was built to commemorate the courage of a local man, Frederick Freshney, who was a volunteer in the Boer War, and served as a trooper in the Imperial Light Horse.

He was severely wounded in the British defeat at Colenso in 1899, and was brought back to Saltfleet paralysed.  He died in 1906 at the age of only thirty two.

Undated postcard

Saltfleet, Freshney, memorial, Boer War
Saltfleet, New Inn
Saltfleet, New Inn
Saltfleet, New Inn
From the rear:

This view of the eastern aspect of the building shows two two-storey bays.

The New Inn is a popular hostelry for the locals, trade passing along the coast road and visitors to the large caravan park adjacent.

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1359992

Jean Howard, August 2020


Saltfleet, New Inn
Saltfleet, New Inn
Saltfleet, New Inn
Saltfleet, New Inn
From the main road, ie, west face:

This is an imposing Grade II listed red brick and pantiled structure.  Originally a 17th century L-shaped building it was added to over the next two centuries.

Its distant but distinctive outline can be clearly seen on William Brown’s 1847 Panorama of Louth.

https://www.louthmuseum.org.uk/galleries/panorama-gallery.php

Jean Howard, August 2020


Saltfleet, New Inn
Saltfleetby, Wesleyan Chapel
Saltfleetby, Wesleyan Chapel
Saltfleetby, Wesleyan Chapel

This dressed stone block is embedded in the gate pier. It is becoming eroded but reads:

EBENEZER  THIS STONE WAS LAID BY MISS WILKINSON TO COMMEMORATE THE ENLARGEMENT OF THE CHAPEL AND THE FITTING UP OF THE SCHOOL ROOM.   AUG 22 1867.  HALLELUJAH.    

Hallelujah is a Hebrew word meaning ‘praise Jehovah’ and is still used in worship, particularly in hymns.

Ebenezer is less well-known.  Also a Hebrew word it means ‘the stone of help’. In this context it also identifies a dissenting chapel.

Jean Howard, August 2020

Saltfleet, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Wilkinson
Saltfleetby, Wesleyan Chapel
Saltfleetby, Wesleyan Chapel
Saltfleetby, Wesleyan Chapel

By the end of the 19th century Saltfleet had chapels for three groups of non-conformists: the Wesleyan chapel, built in 1815, the Primitive chapel, from 1836 and the Free Methodist chapel, established in 1855.

Now only the one of 1815 remains with a porch added in 1867, set back from the main street behind an attractive garden.

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1165896

Jean Howard, August 2020

Saltfleet, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel